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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Sun. Jul. 21 - 12:12 pm
Sun. 07/21/19
Help Build the New Oregon Ice Cream Trail (Photo)
Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council - 07/21/19 5:00 AM
Oregon Ice Cream Trail
Oregon Ice Cream Trail
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There are plenty of great places in Oregon to celebrate National Ice Cream Day on Sunday, July 21. Starting today, 10 of those places became the first stops on the new Oregon Ice Cream Trail.

These are quintessential destinations for acquiring frozen happiness (aka ice cream) by the cone or cup. The list was curated by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, and it includes:

  1. Salt & Straw (2035 NE Alberta St., Portland) – Characterized by inventive flavors, this small batch shop began in 2011 as a food cart not far from this first brick and mortar location.
  2. Ruby Jewel (3713 N Mississippi Ave., Portland) – Known for distinctly original, artisanal ice cream sandwiches, since 2004. This location was their first shop, which opened in 2010.
  3. Fifty Licks (2021 SE Clinton St #101, Portland) – You may have seen the truck around town. The owner loves food science and making ice cream from scratch with local ingredients.
  4. Cloud City Ice Cream (4525 SE Woodstock Blvd, Portland) – Flavors based on family recipes, made on the premise that ice cream makes an ordinary day into something special.
  5. Tillamook Cheese Factory Visitors Center (4165 Highway 101 North, Tillamook) – With more than 1.3 million guests annually, this is consistently one of Oregon’s top tourist attractions, and many go straight for the ice cream.
  6. Serendipity (502 NE Third Street, McMinnville) – This shop gives job experience and training for adults with developmental disabilities, in addition to great ice cream and a player piano.
  7. Prince Pückler’s (1605 E 19th Ave, Eugene) – With more than 40 flavors, this gourmet ice cream has been made with quality local ingredients since 1975.
  8. K & R Drive Inn, (201 John Long Rd, Oakland) – Located just off of I-5 at Rice Hill, and a favorite pit stop for Umpqua ice cream on road trips since 1970.
  9. Goody’s (57100 Beaver Dr., Sunriver) – The ice cream counter at this store continues to be a visitors’ favorite during busy vacation times and a locals tradition year round.
  10. Sno Cap (1053 NW 6th St., Redmond) – Originally Peden’s Ice Cream back in the 60s, Sno Cap is an institution and a locals favorite serving Eberhard’s Ice Cream.

Knowing everybody has their own favorite shops, brands and flavors, the trail is being crowdsourced to include additional stops. For the rest of the month, you can vote and comment on odncouncil.org and social media accounts with the hashtag #OregonIceCreamTrail.

“Oregon is already well-known for wines, microbrews and gourmet doughnuts, but we think it’s high time that Oregon is put on the map for its great ice cream,” said Josh Thomas, Senior Director of Communications for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. “This trail will showcase some of the best ice cream you’ll find anywhere in the world.”

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Attached Media Files: Oregon Ice Cream Trail

Sat. 07/20/19
Death investigation underway following truck fire
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/20/19 10:37 PM

Date of incident: 7/19/19 at 1:28 p.m.

Location: Near Mahogany  Butte, Approximately 45 miles southeast of Bend, Or

Vehicle: 2011 Dodge Crew Cab pick-up, unknown color or license plate

Narrative:

On 7/19/19 at 1:28 p.m., the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office was notified by the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center (COIDC) of a truck fire near Mahogany Butte.  USFS fire crews were on scene and extinguished the fire. A USFS Law Enforcement Officer responded to the scene and later determined human remains were in the vehicle. A Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Deputy from the Special Services Unit responded to the scene, along with Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Detectives.  The Sheriff's Office was assisted at the scene by the Deschutes County Medical Examiner's Office.  Due to the late hour the scene was held overnight to allow investigators to work in the daylight. 

On 7/20/19, Detectives returned to the scene, along with an investigator from the Deschutes County Medical Examiner's Office and an Arson investigator from the Oregon State Police.  Investigators worked throughout the day to collect evidence and to determine the cause of the fire and to identify the deceased person inside the vehicle. Due to the extreme fire damage to the vehicle and the remains, the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office in Clackamas will be assisting in the determining the identity of the deceased person in the coming weeks.  Based upon the investigation at this point, foul play is not suspected in this death. 

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Detective Division will be continuing to investigate this incident and will be assisted by the Oregon State Police Arson Unit.  Further information will be released after the remains are positively identified. 

 Prepared by: Lt. Chad Davis, Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Detective Division

 


Fri. 07/19/19
Motor Vehicle Crash
Bend Police Dept. - 07/19/19 8:13 PM

Type of Incident:  Motor Vehicle Crash

Date & Time of Incident:  July 19, 2019 @ 1600 hrs.

Location of Incident:  US Hwy 20E @ NE Azure Bend, OR

Driver #1:  Raylene Keating           65 year old Bend, OR resident 

                                                            2010 white Subaru Outback

                                                           

Driver #2:  Mary Bilan                     78 year old Bend, OR resident

                                                            2018 grey Dodge minivan                                                 

Narrative:

On Friday, July 19, 2019 at approximately 1600 hrs. Bend Police, along with the Bend Fire Department, responded to the listed location on a report of a motor vehicle crash. 

Investigation determined that Keating was traveling southbound on NE Azure and came to a stop at the intersection of US Hwy 20E.  While attempting to pull on to US Hwy 20E, Keating pulled out directly in front of Bilan who was traveling westbound on US Hwy 20E.  Both vehicles collided at this time with Bilan’s vehicle rolling on to its passenger side.

Keating and Bilan were treated at the scene by Bend Fire Department and were not transported to St. Charles Medical Center.  Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) assisted in closing US Hwy 20E for approximately 45 while the investigation took place.

As a result of this crash, Keating was issued a citation for Failure to Obey a Traffic Control Device.

Lt. Ken Mannix

 

End of Release

 

 


UPDATE - Bend area resident dies as a result of head on crash on Highway 97. (Klamath County) (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/19/19 7:57 PM
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Update

The deceased has been identified as 19 year old female Bend area resident Lauren Cantrell. 

###

On Thursday July 18, 2019 at about 7:30 p.m., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle head on fatal crash on Highway 97 near milepost 197 in Klamath County. 

The investigation revealed that a white 2005 Jeep Liberty was traveling southbound on Highway 97 and for unknown reasons, drifted onto the southbound shoulder.  The operator of the Jeep reportedly overcorrected, and spun into the oncoming lane colliding with a 2014 grey Dodge Ram truck that was towing a travel trailer.  The 2014 Dodge Ram was operated by 57 year old Janesville, California resident, Clarence Noblet and his passenger and spouse, identified as 55 year old Laraine Noblet.

The driver of the Jeep Liberty was pronounced deceased at the scene as a result of the crash.  Identity of the deceased will be withheld until a notification to the family can be conducted.  Clarence and Laraine Noblet were transported to a Bend area hospital where they were treated for non-life-threatening injuries.

Distracted driving and speed are believed to be factors in this crash. 

Highway 97 was closed for approximately 4 hours as a result and OSP was assisted at the scene by ODOT, Chemult Rural Fire District and Crescent Fire District.

    




Attached Media Files: 2019-07/1002/126207/SP19256579.jpg

Public Notice: Provider rate increases for 2019-2021
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/19/19 4:10 PM

(Salem, Ore.) — Public notice is provided by the Department of Human Services, Office of Developmental Disabilities Services, on a rate change.

The Oregon Legislature provided the Office of Developmental Disabilities Services (ODDS) with $30 million General Fund (approximately $92 million total funds) for provider rate increases. The funding is to bring direct support professionals’ wages as close as possible to $15 per hour by the end of the 2019-21 biennium and implement new rate models over the course of the biennium.

Per legislative direction in Senate Bill 5026 and the related Budget Note ODDS will implement the following actions related to provider rates:

  • Effective August 1, 2019, ODDS will implement a 4 percent increase in provider rates. This increase will total approximately $6.4 million General Fund (about $19.5 million total fund). This rate increase will go to: Adult 24-Hour Residential Services; Agency Attendant Care; Day Support Activities, Community and Facility; Employment Path, Community and Facility; Small Group Employment and Supported Living.
  • Effective September 1, 2019, approximately $4.6 million General Fund (approximately $15.5 million total fund) will go to implement new rate models for Children’s Residential Services (group homes).

Details about the change are available at http://www.dhs.state.or.us/spd/tools/dd/cm/ODDS-Expenditure-Guidelines.pdf

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Recreational use advisories issued for Cullaby Lake, Upper Klamath Lake, and South Lake at Tenmile Lakes July 19
Oregon Health Authority - 07/19/19 2:17 PM

July 19, 2019

The Oregon Health Authority issued three recreational use health advisories today due to the presence of cyanobacterial (harmful algae) blooms and cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) above recreational guideline values for human exposure. The lakes are in Clatsop, Klamath, and Coos counties.

Recreational use advisory issued for Cullaby Lake July 19

Recreational use advisory issued for Klamath Lake July 19

Recreational use advisory issued for South Lake at Tenmile Lakes July 19

Video: Dr. Dave Farrer, Toxicologist, gives freshwater advisory safety tips

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, PHD.Communications@state.or.us


Public Meeting Notice - Governor's Commission on Senior Services meets July 25 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/19/19 10:31 AM

(Salem, Ore.) — The Governor’s Commission on Senior Services (GCSS) Executive Committee will meet from 1 to 2:30 p.m. on Thursday, July 25, 2019, at the Department of Human Services’ Office, 500 Summer St. NE, Room 164, Salem, Oregon, 97301.

The meeting is open to the public. Agenda items include regular GCSS business, updates from legislative committee and recruitment efforts, review of applicants, meeting planning and setting the agenda for the full commission meeting on Aug. 8, 2019. Those who can’t attend in person may call into the meeting using this conference line and access code: (503) 934-1400, 6910 1240#.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Lori Watt at i.C.Watt@state.or.us">Lori.C.Watt@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting. For questions about the meeting, please contact: Deb McCuin, program analyst at Debbie.Mccuin@state.or.us.

About the Governor’s Commission on Senior Services

The Governor’s Commission on Senior Services is dedicated to enhancing and protecting the quality of life for all older Oregonians. Through cooperation with other organizations, and advocacy, the commission works to ensure that seniors have access to services that provide, choice, independence, and dignity.

# # #


Americans with Disabilities Act anniversary celebrated with July 23 event
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/19/19 10:15 AM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Oregon Disabilities Commission will host a day-long informational event on July 23 in Salem in recognition of the 29th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The free event, which is open to the public, will feature presentations, panel discussions and other learning opportunities from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Human Services Building, 500 Summer St. NE, Salem. Among the presenters will be members of the Portland Pounders Wheelchair Rugby Team as well as advocates Sherrin Coleman and Gabrielle Guedon.

The day will start with a welcome ceremony followed by concurrent workshop sessions that begin at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Workshop topics will include:

  • The history of the Americans with Disabilities Act;
  • Day-to-day challenges for individuals living with disabilities;
  • Living with a hidden disability;
  • Dealing with behavioral health and disability problems; and,
  • A motivational talk on living with a disability.

Featured event speeches will be from noon to 1 p.m. with speakers from the Oregon Disabilities Commission, Oregon Department of Human Services, Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Governor’s Office. Cake and refreshments will follow the speeches.   

Along with the speeches and informational sessions, there will be several showings of the documentary, Lives Worth Living, about the disability rights movement. Screening times are: 9:45 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Groups who will be hosting informational booths include:

  • Employment First;
  • Vocational Rehabilitation;
  • Disability Rights Oregon;
  • Employed Persons with Disabilities;
  • Oregon ABLE Savings;
  • Oregon Deaf & Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Council; and,
  • Veteran’s Employee Resource Group & Oregon Disabled Veterans Association.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Lori Watt at Lori.C.Watt@state.or.us  Requests should be made at least 48 hours in advance of the event. There will be American Sign Language interpreters at the event.

If you have questions about the celebration and program, contact: OregonDisabilities.Commission@state.or.us.

About the Oregon Disabilities Commission:

The Oregon Disabilities Commission is charged by state statute to advise the Department of Human Services, the Governor, the Legislative Assembly and appropriate state agency administrators on issues related to achieving the full economic, social, legal and political equity of individuals with disabilities. ODC also acts as a coordinating link between and among public and private organizations services individuals with disabilities.

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Thu. 07/18/19
Injured male on NW Oregon (Photo)
Bend Police Dept. - 07/18/19 6:28 PM
Media release
Media release
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Date: Thursday, July 18, 2019                                                                       

Case # 2019-231897                            

Date & Time of Incident: July 18 at 3:09pm                                                    

Type of Incident:  Injured male on NW Oregon                                                                                                          

Location of Incident: 61 NW Oregon; Centennial Parking Garage

Victim:

38 year old male                                                                         Bend resident

Narrative:

On July 18 at 3:09pm, the Bend Police Department was notified by Deschutes County 911 that there was an unconscious male in the street in front of the Centennial Parking Garage on NW Oregon. Officers arrived a few minutes later to find the male on the sidewalk on the south side of NW Oregon in front of the lobby of the parking garage. Bend Fire and Rescue responded and treated the male. The male was transported to St. Charles Bend with serious injuries.  

Officers quickly secured the area in the parking garage directly above the location where the male was located. NW Oregon was closed from NW Lava to NW Bond for investigative purposes. The road was closed for just over an hour.

It was determined the male fell from the top floor of the parking garage and there is no foul play suspected. There is no threat to the community.

 

### End of Release###




Attached Media Files: Media release

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets July 25 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 07/18/19 2:28 PM

July 18, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets July 25 in Portland

What: A meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup

Agenda: Review and discuss community survey results; plan for community engagement; explore strategies and identify activities to further goals.

When: Thursday, July 25, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland, OR, 97232

Details:The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12-to-24 months.

For more information, please visit the RBHC website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh, 503-753-9688, 711 TTY, or .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


"Operation Ship Shape" Targets Lapsed Boat Registrations (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 07/18/19 2:28 PM
2019-07/4139/126197/NPFunActivity.jpg
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The Oregon State Marine Board, in partnership with 32 county sheriff’s offices and the Oregon State Police, will be out in force August 3-4, looking for expired boat registrations as part of “Operation Ship Shape.” 

“We want boaters to look at their boat’s decals, the registration numbers, and their registration card and make sure they’re up-to-date,” says Randy Henry, Boating Safety Program Manager for the Marine Board.  “Make sure you’ve renewed your registration, and make sure you’ve put the decal on your boat, or you could face a $265 citation.” 

The Marine Board is funded by registration, title fees and marine fuel taxes paid by motorized boaters.  No lottery, general fund tax dollars or local facility parking fees are used to fund agency programs.  These fees go back to boaters in the form of boat ramps, docks, trailered parking spaces, restrooms, construction and maintenance, and for boating safety -marine law enforcement services.

“Any boat that is powered by a motor – electric, gas, diesel or steam, and all sailboats 12 feet and longer -must be currently registered when on the water, even when docked or moored,” said Henry.  This includes inflatable rafts with an electric motor, even a standup paddleboard or float tube with an electric motor.  Henry added, “Each boat registration brings in additional funds from motorboat fuel tax and federal boating dollars.  Registering a 16-foot boat provides $77 of funding, but results in additional matching funds of nearly $190, so that $77 registration fee results in $267 of revenue available to fund facilities and marine enforcement.”

Motorboat registrations are $4.50 per foot, rounded up, plus $5 which fund invasive species inspection stations.  Registration fees will increase to $5.95 per foot, plus $5 in 2020, so Henry suggests that if your boat registration lapsed, register now at the current fee, which is valid for two calendar years.

Boaters can renew their boat registration online at www.boatoregon.com/store, or can visit their local registration agent.  Boaters can print off a temporary permit after successfully completing their transaction online or will be issued a temporary permit through an agent for an additional fee.  If you need assistance renewing online, please contact the Marine Board at ine.board@oregon.gov">marine.board@oregon.gov or 503-378-8587.

For a list of registration agents, visit http://www.oregon.gov/osmb/title-registration/Pages/Where-to-Register.aspx.

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Attached Media Files: 2019-07/4139/126197/NPFunActivity.jpg

Fifth annual Oregon Veteran Benefit Expo comes to Pendleton next week (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 07/18/19 2:11 PM
Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford.
Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford.
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The fifth annual Veteran Benefit Expo, the state’s largest veteran benefit resource event, will be held in Pendleton next week, July 27th at the Pendleton Convention Center.  Doors open at 9 a.m.

Organized by the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs and in partnership with Oregon Lottery, the Expo is a one-stop shop for Oregon veterans to learn about and access the full range of their earned benefits and local resources, in areas such as health care, disability claims assistance, finance, home loans, long-term care, mental health, education, business, recreation and more.

Over 65 benefit agencies, nonprofits, service providers and benefit experts will be on hand to assist veterans and their families in learning about the resources available to them.

“One thing we hear from veterans year after year with this event is that they’re blown away by all the benefits and resources they never knew existed,” ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick said. “Most come to the Expo with some idea of a few areas they want information in, but they always walk away with a whole lot more.”

The event moves to a new location each year, and has previously been hosted in Salem, Portland, Redmond and Medford. This year’s event will be its first time visiting eastern Oregon.

The Veteran Benefit Expo is free and open to all. Doors close at 3:00 p.m.

On Friday evening, July 26th at 6 to 7 p.m., ODVA is hosting a veteran’s town hall meeting at the same location. Director Kelly Fitzpatrick will provide a brief update about new veteran services and programs, as well as be available to answer questions and hear concerns from veterans living in Eastern Oregon.

For more information about the Expo, visit www.expo.oregondva.com. 

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Attached Media Files: Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford. , Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford. , Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford. , Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford. , Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford. , Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford.

DPSST Public Safety Memorial Fund Board Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/18/19 1:34 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

July 25, 2019

Contact:                Linsay Hale  
                             503-378-2427

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Public Safety Memorial Fund Board will hold a regular meeting at 10:00 a.m. on July 25, 2019. The meeting will be held in the Boardroom The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Teleconference Information:

Dial-In: 888-273-3658

Participant Code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

 1. Minutes for January 24, 2019

Approve minutes

2. David Blann (DPSST #32676) – Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office; Application for PSMF

Benefits

Presented by Linsay Hale

3. Malcus Williams (DPSST #33171) – Ashland Police Department; Supplemental

Application for Discretionary PSMF Benefits

Presented by Linsay Hale

3. Next meeting – TBD

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Public Safety Memorial Fund Board members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Announces Rate Decreases on Home Loans
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 07/18/19 9:50 AM

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs has announced lower interest rates for its home loan products, effective this week.

The rates for Qualified Veterans Mortgage Bond (QVMB) loan products were lowered by 0.125 percent, while the rates for Unrestricted loan products dropped 0.250 percent. Please see the attached rate sheet for a complete list of pricing options. The rates took effect July 17.

The Oregon Veteran Home Loan Program, which provides the state’s veterans with one of the most unique veteran benefits, has been one of ODVA’s core veteran services since the agency’s inception nearly 75 years ago.

ODVA is a lender and servicer of home loans exclusively for veterans in Oregon and has helped nearly 340,000 veterans secure more than $8 billion in home loans since 1945.  A recent lending limit increase allows veterans to borrow up to $484,350 for a single family, owner-occupied residence in Oregon.

The Oregon Veteran Home Loan is a separate and distinct loan product from the federal VA Home Loan Guarantee benefit.  If you have a federal VA guaranteed mortgage and have any questions regarding potential refunds, please contact your loan servicer or the Regional VA Loan Center at 1-877-827-3702.

To be eligible for this Oregon benefit, a veteran must have served on active duty with the U.S. Armed Forces, as documented on discharge documents (DD-214), and must meet one of the service criteria outlined on ODVA’s website.

For more information about the Oregon Veteran Home Loan and other eligibility requirements, please visit orvethomeloans.com or call the ODVA Home Loan department at 1-888-673-8387.




Attached Media Files: ORVET_Rate_Sheet_Flyer_07172019

Wed. 07/17/19
State Unveils Mobile Live-Fire Training Unit in Salem:New Tool for Career and Volunteer Firefighter Training (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/17/19 2:25 PM
Mobile Fire Training Unit
Mobile Fire Training Unit
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/1187/126168/thumb_MFTU_7-2019_Salem_E.jpg

Oregon is served by more than 13,000 career and volunteer firefighters who are members of more than 300 fire departments and fire protection districts across the state. Approximately 80% of Oregon's firefighters are volunteers.

The Fire Training Program at the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) helps support local fire agencies, in every corner of the state, by supporting a variety of training classes.  DPSST also has more than a dozen mobile props that enable firefighters to receive realistic hands-on training. 

One of the most difficult tasks in the fire service is to provide personnel with realistic training to prepare them for field operations. Certainly, providing live-fire training is an important component. For combination and volunteer organizations, especially those in rural areas, the ability to provide live-fire training can be an extremely complex problem.  In the past many fire agencies had access to homes and buildings in their local communities that were going to be demolished that provided excellent hands-on training opportunities for firefighters.  Environmental concerns, neighborhood concerns, building materials, and a variety of other safety considerations have limited this.

This morning, at the City of Salem Fire Department, DPSST unveiled its newest addition of props available to local fire agencies, a 53 foot Mobile Fire Training Unit (MFTU).  The MFTU cost $500,000 and was funded by a Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG) from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

This unit contains a permanent propane-fired bed prop and rollover simulator. Portable propane-fired pans can be relocated in the unit and covered with other simulated props to provide a variety of live-fire exercises. The unit’s onboard generator makes it totally self-contained and portable, though an optional shore power connection is available.  

Movable interior wall panels enable instructors to change the layout of the unit to present participants with different scenarios. Several panels have mock doors or other moveable components. The integrated smoke generator creates a dark smoke that forces members to crawl and search in realistic type conditions. The collapsible second story provides the means for performing other essential skills like laddering, vertical ventilation, and multistory fire attack. A few individuals can easily erect the second story in approximately 30 minutes

The MFTU contains numerous safety features to minimize participant risk. For propane fires to function, the operator must step on a control pedal while another instructor engages the portable safety pendant. Release of either immediately shuts the unit down. Temperature and propane sensors force operations to occur within safe limits. Should either exceed the allowable range, the unit automatically shuts down, sounds an alarm, and activates ventilation fans.

On an annual basis DPSST provides training to approximately 6,000 career and volunteer firefighters around the state free of charge thanks to the state's Fire Insurance Premium Tax.

The MFTU will remain at Salem Fire for two additional weeks which will allow Salem firefighters to train use it for training and also enable DPSST staff to run the new unit through its paces before scheduling it for travel to fire stations around the state.

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Patricia Patrick-Joling, public citizen representative, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 




Attached Media Files: Mobile Fire Training Unit , Mobile Fire Training Unit , Mobile Fire Training Unit , Mobile Fire Training Unit , Mobile Fire Training Unit , Mobile Fire Training Unit , Mobile Fire Training Unit

Yamhill County Photographer Charged with Producing Child Pornography
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/17/19 1:11 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that Robert Arnold Koester, 52, a photographer from Yamhill County, Oregon, has been charged with six counts of production of child pornography.

According to the indictment, beginning in January 2015, Koester is alleged to have knowingly coerced six minor victims in Oregon to engage in sexually explicit conduct for the purpose of producing a visual depiction of such conduct.

Koester is a suspected serial sexual predator who took nude photos of models and is alleged to have sexually assaulted many of these models, some of whom are minors. Koester, also known as Bert Kay, Rhake Winter, and Qitooly, has potentially been engaging in these criminal acts since 1994, continuing until his initial arrest in Carlsbad, California, on November 13, 2018.

Koester faces dozens of additional state and federal charges for related criminal conduct in Yamhill County and Carlsbad. On November 15, 2018, Koester was charged in San Diego County Superior Court with six felony counts involving sex crimes against minors. A week later, 35 additional related state charges were added. On February 6, 2019, Koester was charged with 32 related felony charges in Yamhill County Circuit Court. And finally, on March 7, 2019, Koester was charged in a two-count criminal information with production of child pornography by the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the Southern District of California.

Federal law enforcement officials across the country have been working closely with local law enforcement in Carlsbad, Yamhill County and elsewhere to identify potential victims in this case. The FBI has created an online system to collect victim information.

If you have information about this ongoing investigation or believe you or someone you know may have been victimized by Koester, the FBI requests that you complete this secure, confidential online questionnaire. Information and tips from the public may also be submitted confidentially via email to modelcase@fbi.gov.

Identified victims may be eligible for certain services and rights under federal and/or state law. More information is available at fbi.gov/modelcase.

This case was investigated by the FBI in Portland and San Diego, the Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office and the Carlsbad Police Department. It is being prosecuted by Ravi Sinha, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

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Attached Media Files: 2019-07/6325/126163/INDICTMENT-Koester-Final.pdf

DSL implements Swan Island beach use restrictions, installs signs
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 07/17/19 11:18 AM

NEWS RELEASE – for immediate release

Media Contact:

Ken Armstrong, Communications Manager, 503-881-2623, ken.armstrong@state.or.us                      

July 17, 2019

 

Oregon DSL installs signage at Swan Island beaches announcing public use restrictions for camping, campfires

 

SALEM, Ore. – In response to the State Land Board’s direction last month to initiate a rulemaking imposing permanent use restrictions at certain beaches in the Portland area, the Oregon Department of State Lands on July 1 implemented temporary restrictions, which include placing signs on the subject properties advising the public about the restrictions.

On June 11, the State Land Board directed the Oregon Department of State Lands to pursue permanent use restrictions on the easterly banks of the Willamette River at Swan Island within the city of Portland.

The action comes as a result of a request from the Port of Portland and Daimler Trucks North America (a tenant of the port) that DSL enact restrictions on public use due to illegal and nuisance activity. The port is an upland owner adjacent to state property, which extends to Ordinary High Water. The department and the port have documented illegal and nuisance activities on state-owned lands, and which include:

  • Littering and dumping
  • Reckless burning and open fires
  • Damage to property

Temporary restrictions prohibit all activity between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. and prohibit campsites and campfires at all times on the east bank of the Willamette River between river miles 9 and 10 in Multnomah County.

In the meantime, DSL will begin the process of initiating permanent restrictions by convening a Rulemaking Advisory Committee to review and provide input on the proposed rules. A public comment period will be part of that process. More information on the rulemaking process will be available at: https://www.oregon.gov/dsl/Laws/Pages/Rulemaking.aspx

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www.oregon.gov/dsl




Attached Media Files: 2019-07/1074/126162/Swan_Island_signage_DSL.docx

Oregon Department of Forestry does nighttime aviation testing in Grant County
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/17/19 11:13 AM

JOHN DAY, Ore. — The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) is working with CO Fire Aviation, an aerial resource vendor, to test the effectiveness and safety of nighttime use of Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs) to fight wildfires in Oregon.

Exploratory testing started Monday night, July 15, at the John Day Airport, and continued Tuesday night. On Wednesday and Thursday nights, testing will transition from the airport to private lands protected by ODF’s John Day Unit in Grant County. ODF and CO Fire Aviation are coordinating with local emergency personnel and dispatch centers to provide current information on the operation.

This testing evaluates the feasibility of using advanced night vision technology to identify firefighters  and any hazards on the ground. Testing operations include on-the-ground firefighters communicating with the pilot via radio, using lights and lasers to identify drop areas. Information gathered during the testing will be used to determine whether night SEAT operations would be a viable tool.

“ODF consistently evaluates advances in technology to support our mission to safely suppress wildfires at the smallest size possible,” ODF State Aviation Manager Neal Laugle said. “Safety is first and foremost, which is why exploratory testing like this is so important. Using SEATs at night would allow firefighters to take advantage of the reduced fire activity typical in the evening hours. These aviation resources could support ground firefighters by slowing the fire’s spread and intensity.” 

Outcomes of this testing phase will determine the next steps in evaluating the potential use of this innovative technology.

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Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council meets Aug. 1 in Lebanon
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/17/19 11:00 AM

LEBANON, Ore. – The Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) will meet 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Aug. 1 at the Samaritan Community Hospital, Health Career and Training Center, Conference Room 3, 525 N Santiam Hwy, Lebanon. The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes presentations from local trail advocates and land managers about trail projects and initiatives.

View the agenda online: oregon.gov/oprd/Trail_Programs_Services/Documents/082019ORTACAgenda.pdf.

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and its partners in the development and promotion of high quality non-motorized trail systems throughout Oregon.

The council is made up of seven volunteer members representing the five congressional districts and two coastal representatives. Members are appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. The council holds quarterly meetings in different locations across the state.

For more information about ORTAC, visit oregon.gov/OPRD/Trail_Programs_Services/Pages/Advisory-Committees.aspx

The meeting location is ADA accessible. Individuals who need special accommodations to attend should contact Jodi Bellefeuille at 503-986-0716 or ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov at least three days in advance.


Travelers Losing Thousands To 'Expedia' Imposters
Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific - 07/17/19 10:44 AM

                                                  BBB TEAMS UP WITH EXPEDIA GROUP TO WARN CONSUMERS

A network of scammers is using Expedia Group’s name to take consumers for thousands of dollars. Better Business Bureau serving the Northwest and Pacific has received several reports in just the past several days from consumers who’ve lost as much as $3,700.

Expedia is a BBB Accredited Business with an A+ rating. In a statement, the Bellevue, Washington-based company said, “We are happy to team up with the BBB to educate people about this scam and share tips on how they can protect themselves.”

The scam begins when consumers search online, then call customer service numbers purporting to be Expedia. Customers ask the representative to confirm or change existing reservations they’ve made through the Expedia travel site. But instead of legitimate Expedia reps, they are calling phone numbers used by impostors. The impostors say their refund site isn’t working properly and the consumer needs to purchase gift cards in order to receive a refund or change bookings.

Consumers reporting this scam hail from 17 different states and Canada, and, together, report losing nearly $10,000.  One woman told BBB that the scammer kept telling her to, “purchase (additional) gift cards saying that he had to merge the cards together,” but not to worry as she, “was going to be well reimbursed.” Several customers say the fake customer service rep stayed with them on their cell phones while they purchased the gift cards.

That’s what happened when BBBNW+P contacted one of the phony numbers and listened as the impostor tried to convince us we needed to buy gift cards, giving us a convoluted explanation of how we would get a refund.

Expedia Group’s statement continues, “Our goal is always to ensure travelers have a seamless and trouble-free booking experience with us, and it’s incredibly unfortunate that scammers have disrupted our customers’ well-deserved vacations and travel plans. Rest assured that we are also working hard to identify ways to prevent this from happening in the future.”  

Expedia Group is taking steps to counteract these impostors, including working with popular search engines to reduce the occurrence of fake ads, making its customer service contact number more visible, and adding info about these scams to its customer service portal.

BBBNW+P offers the following tips for consumers to protect themselves:

  • Most trustworthy companies will never demand a gift card as any form of payment and consumers should never have to pay to get money back.
  • Using a search engine does not guarantee getting the correct number. Always go directly to a website to find contact information. Large companies often have a ‘Contact Us’ button or a help hotline number directly on their webpage.
  • Protect personal information. Be cautious when connecting to public Wi-Fi and never use it for online banking or entering personal or financial information.

 

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ABOUT BBB:?For more than 100 years, the Better Business Bureau has been helping people find businesses, brands,?and?charities they can trust. In 2017, people turned to BBB more than 160 million times for BBB Business Profiles on more than 5.2 million businesses and Charity Reports on 11,000 charities, all available for free at?bbb.org. There are local, independent BBBs across the United States, Canada,?and?Mexico, including BBB Northwest & Pacific, which serves more than 15 million consumers in Alaska, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Hawaii and Western Wyoming.??? 


Prineville Wins National Budgeting Award (Photo)
StingRay Communications - City of Prineville - 07/17/19 10:33 AM
L to R: Liz Schuette, Jordan Anderson & Lori Hooper
L to R: Liz Schuette, Jordan Anderson & Lori Hooper
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/6389/126159/thumb_City_of_Prineville_Finance_Team.JPG

City of Prineville one of only 16 municipalities nationwide to earn ‘Special Capital Recognition’ by the Government Finance Officers Association

(PRINEVILLE, Ore)— For the 13th year, the City of Prineville has been recognized as outstanding for its commitment to meeting the highest standards of government budgeting.

Earlier this spring, Prineville was awarded the Distinguished Budget Presentation Award by the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) for excellence in preparation of the city’s 2018-2019 fiscal budget.

Additionally, Prineville’s budget document earned the group’s Special Capital Recognition designation, an award given when all three independent reviewers mark the presentation of “Capital expenditures” and “Impact of capital expenditures on operating budget” as outstanding. Prineville is one of only two Oregon cities and one of only 16 government entities nationwide to obtain this recognition.

“The award represents a significant achievement,” wrote the GFOA in an award letter to the City of Prineville.

In order to be considered for the budget award, Prineville had to satisfy nationally recognized guidelines for effective budget presentation. The guidelines are designed to assess how well the city’s budget serves as a policy document, a financial plan, an operations guide, and a communications device.

To receive the Distinuished Budget Award the budget document must be rated proficient or outstanding in all four overall categories and meet all mandatory criteria.

“This tremendous recognition is a testament to the City of Prineville’s finance team, which is committed to short and long-term strategic planning and modeling, allowing the City to maintain a quality credit rating,” said Prineville Mayor Steve Uffelman. “I’m especially proud of the Special Capital Recognition -- a result of our diligence in planning capital projects. The benefit for the community is a budget document that is well-planned and links precisely to our goal of maintaining long-term stability for the city.”

GFOA awarded 1,082 governments in the United States and Canada the Distinguished Budget Award for 2018-2019. The most recent Budget Award recipients, along with their corresponding budget documents, are posted on GFOA’s website, gfoa.org. According to the GFOA, award recipients have pioneered efforts to improve the quality of budgeting and provide an excellent example for other governments throughout North America.

About the City of Prineville

Located east of the Cascade mountains in Oregon’s high desert, the City of Prineville is a resurgent rural community that has preserved its small-town, ranching roots and Western lifestyle while embracing smart growth in a business-friendly environment. With a population nearing 10,000 residents, the county seat of Crook County attracts a diversity of business and lifestyle interests, including tech giants Facebook and Apple, recreational enthusiasts, and a thriving agricultural industry. Incorporated in 1880, City of Prineville operates the oldest continuously running municipal short line railway in the U.S., as well as a public golf course, and airport. Prineville boasts numerous recreational assets, including the Ochoco National Forest and Crooked River, and remains a popular destination for anglers and hunters. For more information on City services and programs visit cityofprineville.com.

About the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA)

The Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA), founded in 1906, represents public finance officials throughout the United States and Canada. The association's more than 20,000 members are federal, state/provincial, and local finance officials deeply involved in planning, financing, and implementing thousands of governmental operations in each of their jurisdictions. GFOA's mission is to advance excellence in state and local government financial management.

 

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Attached Media Files: L to R: Liz Schuette, Jordan Anderson & Lori Hooper

Vehicle versus Bicyclist Crash
Bend Police Dept. - 07/17/19 5:17 AM

Bicyclist- 14 year old Bend Resident

Driver- 74 year old Bend resident

 

 

On 7-17-19 at about 2017 hours, Bend Police and Fire were dispatched to the area of Highway 20 East and NE 27th Street for a report of a vehicle versus bicyclist accident.  NE 27th Street was closed briefly for the investigation which determined the juvenile female was attempting to ride her bicycle across NE 27th Street near the Shell Stop and Go and misjudged the traffic flow.  The juvenile female, who was not using the crosswalk, was struck by a vehicle traveling north on NE 27th Street and attempting to turn west.

The juvenile female was transported to St Charles by ambulance with non-life threatening injuries.


Tue. 07/16/19
State Announces Federal Funding Awards for Affordable Housing
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 07/16/19 5:11 PM

SALEM, OR - Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) is excited to announce funding awards of $45,569,423 to build and preserve 636 homes through the awards of federal 9% Low Income Housing Tax Credits, HOME, and National Housing Trust Fund resources, which leverage local, state, and private investments. Eleven developments were approved by the Oregon Housing Stability Council to receive funding.


“No Oregonian should worry about having a safe, stable place to sleep,” said Governor Kate Brown. “Families need homes that are more than just four walls and a roof, with rents that don’t mean choosing which bill to pay or what to do without this month. I am grateful that these resources will allow 636 families to rest easy in an affordable home.”


This latest round of awards brings OHCS to a record number of homes in the development pipeline – more than 9,800 affordable homes are in progress across the state. Oregon’s Statewide Housing Plan (oregon.gov/ohcs/pages/oshp.aspx) set a five-year goal to triple the development pipeline of affordable rental housing up to 25,000 homes.


“This is a big step toward meeting the ambitious goals of the Statewide Housing Plan,” said OHCS Director Margaret Salazar. “These developments bring us that much closer to closing the affordable rental housing gap and reducing housing cost burden for Oregonians.”

The developments that received awards are listed below, with full details available online: www.oregon.gov/ohcs/DO/docs/07-12-2019-Affordable-Housing-Awards.pdf.

  • Applegate Landing in Lebanon, 36 homes
  • Bridge Meadows in Redmond, 40 homes
  • Carnelian Place & Phoenix Crossing in Bend, 71 homes
  • Colonia Paz I in Lebanon, 24 homes
  • Going 42 in Portland, 55 homes
  • The Mary Ann in Beaverton, 54 homes
  • Oregon City Terrace in Oregon City, 48 homes
  • Patriot Heights in Stanfield, 53 homes
  • River Road Affordable Housing in Eugene, 60 homes
  • Rogue Valley Apartments in White City and Eagle Point, 76 homes
  • Rose Bowl in Portland, 71 homes
  • Snowberry Brook II in Ashland, 71 homes
     

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet July 19
Oregon Health Authority - 07/16/19 3:56 PM

July 16, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet July 19

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, and general updates; public testimony; follow-up to questions from June meeting; select 2020 measure set; adjourn.

When: July 19, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Five Oak Building (formerly Lincoln) (421 SW Oak St, Portland, OR, 97204) Suite 775, Transformation Training Room. The public also may join remotely via webinar and listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 1277166.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, or .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Board of Forestry meets July 24 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/16/19 3:52 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet in Salem on July 24 at 9 a.m. This month’s meeting agenda includes:

  • A presentation on activities of the Committee for Family Forestlands and discussion of key issues and future policy needs.
  • An update on the 2019 fire season.
  • Testimony from the Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee.
  • Consideration of and determination on the petition for Forest Practices Act rulemaking on protection requirements for coho salmon resource sites.
  • An update on the department’s current fiscal and budgetary status.

The meeting will be held in the Tillamook Room, Administration Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, located at 2600 State St., in Salem. The meeting is open to the public, with the exception of the executive session scheduled from 11 a.m. until noon.

Public comment will be accepted on agenda topics and at the start of the meeting for topics not on the agenda. Written comments may be submitted to oardofforestry@oregon.gov">Boardofforestry@oregon.gov in advance of the meeting. A livestream option and meeting materials are available online at https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/BOFMeetings.aspx.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200.

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The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/AboutBOF.aspx.


DPSST Parole & Probation Officer Firearms Training Revision Workgroup Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/16/19 3:43 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

July 15th, 2019

Contact:                Chris Enquist
                             503-378-2309

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Parole & Probation Officer Firearms Training Revision Workgroup will hold a regular meeting on July 30th, 2019 from 11:00a-2:00p.  The meeting will be held in room A235 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Agenda Items:

  1. Welcome
  2. Review of History of Firearms Training for Parole Officers
  3. Discussion of Scope of Revision
  4. Review of Staff Recommendations
  5. Discussion and Decision on September Pilot Program
  6. Workgroup Goals and Future Tasks
  7. Conclusion

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Parole & Probation Officer Field Training Manual Revision Workgroup members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Veterans' Town Hall Meeting Set for Next Week at Pendleton Convention Center (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 07/16/19 1:35 PM
Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford.
Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/1082/126132/thumb_DSC_8786.jpg

Kelly Fitzpatrick, director of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs, will hold her first veterans’ town hall meeting in Pendleton next week.

“I really look forward to this opportunity to meet members of the eastern Oregon veteran community and learn about the concerns, issues and challenges facing veterans and their families in this part of the state,” Fitzpatrick said.

She will also answer questions and share the latest updates regarding ODVA programs and initiatives, as well as veteran-related developments from the 2019 legislative session.

The Veterans’ Town Hall event will begin at 6 p.m. Friday, July 26, at the Pendleton Convention Center. It will also be recorded and livestreamed on the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs’ Facebook page for the benefit of those who are not able to attend in person.

The following day, and in the same location, ODVA and over 60 partnering organizations and agencies will be joining together for the Fifth Annual Veteran Benefit Expo, the state’s largest veteran resource event, which is being held in eastern Oregon for the first time.

The purpose of the Expo is to provide a one-stop shop for Oregon veterans of all eras and walks of life to learn about and access the full range of their earned benefits. The event will offer resources from many different benefit areas, including health care, claims assistance, finance, home loans, long-term care, mental health, education, business and recreation.

The Expo is free and requires no pre-registration. The event will be open to the public from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 27 at the Pendleton Convention Center.

For more information about the Expo, visit www.expo.oregondva.com




Attached Media Files: Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford. , Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford. , Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford. , Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford. , Scenes from the 2018 Veteran Benefit Expo in Medford.

Area Man Sentenced to 110 Months in Federal Prison for Bank Robbery
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/16/19 1:13 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—Dannie Kay Alston, 67, was sentenced today to 110 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for robbing four Oregon and Southwest Washington banks in a four-week period beginning in August 2017. Alston has no known permanent residence.

On February 21, 2019, Alston pleaded guilty in federal court to the following bank robberies:

  1. August 7, 2017; Chase Bank in Vancouver, Washington; collecting $2,300
  2. August 15, 2017; Wells Fargo Bank in Medford, Oregon; collecting $4,690
  3. August 24, 2017; Wells Fargo Bank in Salem, Oregon; collecting $1,317
  4. September 9, 2017; First Interstate Bank in Roseburg, Oregon; collecting $3,441

In each of his robberies, Alston attempted to disguise his identity by wearing sunglasses and some type of ball or ski cap. He communicated with the targeted bank tellers primarily through handwritten notes or signs. At his last robbery, in Roseburg, witnesses were able to provide a description of Alston’s getaway vehicle, leading to his quick arrest by the Oregon State Police. Police recovered the note used in the Roseburg robbery, a starter’s pistol with loaded caps, a Taser, sunglasses, wig and $3,441 cash from Alston’s person and vehicle.

Alston is a career offender with a criminal history spanning five decades and four states. He has previous burglary convictions in California and Texas, robbery convictions in California, Florida and Oregon, as well as assault, theft and narcotics convictions.

During sentencing, U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane ordered Alston to pay $11,748 in restitution.

This case was investigated by the FBI, Clark County Washington Sheriff’s Office, Medford Police Department, Oregon State Police and Roseburg Police Department. It was prosecuted by Pamela Paaso, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

The case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Returning the favor: With bases covered at home, ODF crews assist with Alaska wildfire response (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/16/19 11:30 AM
2019-07/1072/126126/Alaska_initial_attack_ODF_crews_on_the_ground..jpeg
2019-07/1072/126126/Alaska_initial_attack_ODF_crews_on_the_ground..jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/1072/126126/thumb_Alaska_initial_attack_ODF_crews_on_the_ground..jpeg

SALEM, Ore. – With relatively favorable early fire season conditions, last week the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) sent personnel to Alaska to assist with wildfire suppression. ODF leadership selected personnel from areas where current conditions and available resources allow for the opportunity to send help to our Alaskan partners while ensuring capacity to respond to any local fires on the home front.

As partners in the Northwest Compact — an agreement allowing quick and cost-effective resources sharing across state and international lines — Oregon and Alaska have helped one another in years past. Most recently, crews from Alaska provided assistance on both the Klondike and Taylor fires during the 2018 fire season.

The Alaska deployment offers unique firefighting challenges and training opportunities, such as working on the permafrost, avoiding conflicts with local wildlife, and the need for helicopter rides for personnel to remote fire camps. While this experience may differ from typical fires in Oregon, the objective is familiar for ODF crews: safely put fires out while they are small. Given ODF strives to safely put fires out at 10 acres or less 98 percent of the time, the focus on initial attack is a familiar one for these skilled firefighters.

“These ODF crews were selected from across the state for their skill and experience with initial attack, as well as the availability and conditions back home. Our folks are not assigned to a large fire up here, but are relieving exhausted personnel engaged in continuing efforts to catch new fire starts while they are small. As part of Oregon’s complete and coordinated system, and the Northwest Compact, this is what ODF is all about,” said ODF’s Jamie Paul, serving as the Agency Representative for ODF resources in Alaska. “We are happy the timing allows us to assist our interagency Alaskan partners in their time of need.”

With 8 overhead positions and 20 initial attack crew members, ODF has a total of 28 personnel currently engaged in Alaska. As crews prioritize initial attack efforts and minimize the long-term impact on resources, overhead positions are helping oversee operations.  A maximum duration of the standard 14-day assignment is expected, while some resources will head home as early as next week.

Consisting of 5 U.S. states; Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana, the NW Compact also includes the 5 Canadian Provinces/Territories of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Yukon, and the Northwest Territories.

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Attached Media Files: 2019-07/1072/126126/Alaska_initial_attack_ODF_crews_on_the_ground..jpeg , 2019-07/1072/126126/ODF_Initial_Attack_crew_pauses_to_pose_for_a_group_photo..jpeg

Girl Scouts of the USA Launches 42 New Badges to Mobilize Girls to Change the World
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington - 07/16/19 11:14 AM

Girl Scouts of the USA Launches 42 New Badges to Mobilize Girls to Change the World

By exploring topics like high adventure in the outdoors, coding, space science, and more, girls take control of their own leadership experiences. 

July 16, 2019—Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) today reveals 42 new badges exclusively for girls in grades K–12 that allow them to make their own choices about how they want to experience and influence the world. The badges enhance the organization’s existing girl-led programming, offering girls everything from adventuring in the snow or mountains to learning how to use coding to solve problems they care about. Girl Scout programming has long promoted independent decision making, which helps girls develop agency, challenge themselves to move beyond their comfort zones, and build confidence in their leadership abilities.

Among the 42 new offerings are Outdoor High Adventure badges that feature, for the first time in Girl Scouts’ history, two distinct activity options, letting girls choose how they want to earn each badge. Giving girls choices is important for developing their sense of self, their own voice, and gender equality—research from the World Bank Group shows that increasing women’s agency and decision-making abilities is key to improving their lives, communities, and the world. And research shows that Girl Scouts are more likely than other girls to take an active role in decision making (80% vs. 51%).

In addition to existing badge offerings, girls in grades 6–12 can now pursue:

  • Nine Cybersecurity badges, through which girls learn about the inner workings of computer technology and cybersecurity and apply concepts of safety and protection to the technology they use every day. Activities range from decrypting and encrypting messages, to learning proper protection methods for devices, to exploring real-world hacking scenarios (funded by Palo Alto Networks).
     
  • Three Space Science badges, through which girls explore topics such as the universe and their place in it, properties of light, and inspiring careers in space science (funded by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate and led by the SETI Institute).
     
  • Think Like a Citizen Scientist, a Girl Scout Leadership Journey during which girls participate in interactive activities to practice observation techniques; collect data; and share their findings with real-world scientists through an online network. As with all of Girl Scouts’ Leadership Journeys, girls use their newly honed skills to take action on a community issue of their choosing (funded by Johnson & Johnson and The Coca-Cola Foundation).
     
  • To prepare girls in grades 6–12 to pursue computer science careers, Girl Scouts will launch the organization’s first Cyber Challenge events in select areas this fall. At these events, which will take place October 19, girls will learn crucial cybersecurity skills by completing challenges such as running traceroutes and identifying phishing schemes (funded by Raytheon).

The new programming for girls in grades K–12 includes:

  • 12 Outdoor High Adventure badges, designed for girls to explore nature and experience exciting outdoor adventures like backpacking, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, rock climbing, and tree climbing—giving them the confidence to support one another, take healthy risks, and spend dedicated time in nature. These are the first Girl Scout badges that members can earn by choosing one of two self-directed paths (funded by The North Face). 
     
  • 18 Coding for Good badges, which not only teach girls the basics of coding but also detail how every stage of the coding process provides girls with opportunities to use their skills for good. Girls will learn about algorithms through age-appropriate, creative activities, such as coding positive memes to spread a message about a cause they care about, designing a digital game to educate people about an issue, and developing an app to promote healthy habits. Every Coding for Good badge includes a plugged-in and unplugged version, so that all girls can learn the foundations of coding, regardless of their access to technology (funded by AT&T and Dell Technologies).

“Girl Scouts has ignited the power and potential of girls for over a century, and we are committed to ensuring that today’s girls are the future of American leadership,” said GSUSA CEO Sylvia Acevedo. “Girl Scouts is where girls can explore new subjects, discover their passions, learn to take smart risks, and become their best, most confident selves—whether they want to become a NASA astronaut, an entrepreneur, a rock climber, a coder, or a cybersecurity agent.” 

GSUSA works with top organizations in fields that interest today’s girls. Combined with Girl Scouts’ expertise in girl leadership, these organizations and specialists advise and weigh in on content to provide the most cutting-edge programming available to girls. Content collaborators include codeSpark, the National Integrated Cyber Education Research Center (NICERC), SciStarter, and Vidcode. In true girl-led fashion, girls also tested the new offerings.

At Girl Scouts she’ll discover who she is, what she’s passionate about, and what she wants to achieve—both today and in the future. Join or volunteer at www.girlscouts.org/join.

###

We're Girl Scouts of the USA
We're 2.5 million strong—more than 1.7 million girls and 750,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Georgia, she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. And with programs from coast to coast and across the globe, Girl Scouts offers every girl a chance to practice a lifetime of leadership, adventure, and success. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscouts.org.

“Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts” is based upon work supported by NASA Science under cooperative agreement No. NNX16AB90A. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

About Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington

In partnership with more than 8,000 adult members, Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington prepares 14,500 girls in grades K-12 for a lifetime of leadership, adventure and success. GSOSW’s programs in civic engagement, financial literacy, the outdoors and STEM serve girls in 37 counties in Oregon, and Clark, Klickitat and Skamania counties in Southwest Washington. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence and character, who make the world a better place. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:Employment in Oregon June 2019
Oregon Employment Department - 07/16/19 10:00 AM

Oregon’s Unemployment Rate 4.1 Percent in June 

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.1 percent in June, essentially unchanged from 4.2 percent in May. Oregon’s unemployment rate has been between 4.0 percent and 4.4 percent for 32 months, dating back to November 2016. The U.S. unemployment rate was little changed at 3.7 percent in June.

Oregon’s unemployment rate has been at or near record low levels for nearly three years. Of those unemployed in June, nearly half were either new or returning to the labor force. At 46.9 percent, the share of unemployed who were entrants was the highest since May 1999. Another 38.5 percent were unemployed due to a job loss. The remaining 14.7 percent had voluntarily left their previous job and were looking for work.

In June, Oregon’s total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 900 jobs. The jobs gain in June followed a revised loss of 200 jobs in May. Monthly gains for June were strongest in professional and business services, which added 1,200 jobs, and in manufacturing, which added 900 jobs. Two industries with large losses in June were leisure and hospitality (-1,000 jobs) and retail trade (-900 jobs). Other sectors were close to their usual seasonal pattern of job gains or losses for June.

Looking at longer-term trends, Oregon’s economy continued to grow rapidly. Since June 2018, total nonfarm payroll employment was up 46,100 jobs, or 2.4 percent. Oregon’s job growth rate over the past 12 months was faster than the U.S. job growth rate of 1.5 percent.

The most rapid gains over the past year were in transportation, warehousing, and utilities (+4,500 jobs, or 6.9%) and construction (+7,100 jobs, or 6.8%). Job gains were widespread, with three other major industries each adding between 2.6 percent and 3.7 percent to their jobs base in the past 12 months. These industries were manufacturing (+7,100 jobs, or 3.7%), professional and business services (+8,800 jobs, or 3.5%), and health care and social assistance (+6,800 jobs, or 2.6%). During that time, none of the major industries cut a substantial number of jobs, although three industries showed little change: retail trade; financial activities; and mining and logging.

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the June county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, July 23rd, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for July on Tuesday, August 13th.


Notes:
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the October, November and December 2018 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.


The PDF version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2019-07/930/126114/Employment_in_Oregon--June_2019--Press_Release.pdf

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against the One-Ring Scam (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 07/16/19 10:00 AM
TT - One Ring Scam - July 16, 2019
TT - One Ring Scam - July 16, 2019
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/3585/125940/thumb_Slide1.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment.  This week: building a digital defense against the “one-ring” telephone scam.

It seems like most of us get those annoying calls from telemarketers and scammers these days. Your phone rings and rings and rings. Often, these are calls come from a lovely robotic voice informing you that you “missed an important payment.” Or, perhaps, the voice on the other end of the line is congratulating you on that “expense-free vacation” that you just won. In both scenarios, the scammer will try to get you to pay money to settle the non-existent debt or to pay for a small processing fee for that free trip. Later you discover later that you were taken.

While these kinds of telephone scams are not new, our friends at the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) are warning the public about a new variation that is popping up across the nation. It’s called the “one-ring” scam. Here’s how it works: you get a phone call from a number you do not recognize, and then the call drops after only one or two rings. The fraudster is counting on your curiosity – and maybe fear that the call you missed is really important. The goal is to get you to call the number back because, in reality, the scammer is calling from an international toll number. If you call back, you will likely receive per-minute toll charges ... and who do you think collects those funds? You are right if you guessed the scam artist.

So what can you do to avoid being a victim of this scam?

  • Do NOT call back numbers that you do not recognize, especially those that appear to come from overseas.
  • If you have received these calls, report the number to the FTC at www.donotcall.gov
  • Frequently check your phone bill for unusual or suspicious charges

As always, if you have been a victim of an online scam, report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

###




Attached Media Files: TT - One Ring Scam - July 16, 2019 , TT - One Ring Scam - July 16, 2019

Motorcyclist dies in crash on Hwy 101 - Coos County
Oregon State Police - 07/16/19 9:25 AM

On Monday, July 15, 2019 at approximately 10:30 P.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 101 near milepost 279.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2003 Yamaha Motorcycle, operated by Robert Killough (52) of Bandon, OR. was traveling south on Hwy 101 when it left the roadway and crashed.

Killough sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Oregon State Police was assisted by the Coos County Sheriff's Department, Bandon Police Department, Bandon Fire Department, Bay Cities Ambulance, and ODOT.


Mon. 07/15/19
Pedestrian dies while crossing I-205 - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 07/15/19 8:06 PM

On Monday, July 15, 2019 at approximately 5:05 A.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to the report of a pedestrian hit by a vehicle on I-205 near mile post 12.

Preliminary investigation revealed that the pedestrian was headed east crossing the northbound lanes of I-205. The pedestrian was struck by a 2019 Ford Cargo Van operated by Steven Stewart (56) of Donald, OR.

The pedestrian sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. He will not be identified until next of kin can be notified.

Stewart remained on scene and is cooperating with the investigation.

OSP was assisted by Clackamas County Sheriff's Office, Clackamas County Fire Department, and ODOT


Final health insurance rate decisions lower 2020 premiums by $44 million
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 07/15/19 4:34 PM

(Salem) - The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation issued final rate decisions for small businesses and individuals who buy their own health insurance.

Final health insurance rates for the 2020 individual market have been lowered 1 percent on average from the division’s preliminary rate decisions, and 2 percent from the original requests filed by insurance companies in May. The final rates lower 2020 premiums by approximately $44 million from the original requests submitted by health insurance companies.

“Our collaborative rate review process has been key to building a stable health insurance market that enabled us to limit the individual market rate increase to an average of 1.5 percent,” said Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi. “The Oregon Reinsurance Program has also continued to show its value, keeping individual rates 6 percent lower than they would be without the program. We are grateful to the legislature for passing and our stakeholders for supporting the six year extension of this important program.”

The division’s transparent rate review process brings insurance companies, the division, and the public together to review health insurance rates. The collaborative process ensures all data are thoroughly reviewed and considered before rates are charged to consumers.

Several factors, such as medical costs, federal policy changes, the Oregon Reinsurance Program, and federal risk adjustment payments are considered to make sure rates will adequately cover health care costs.

Individual market 
The division issued final decisions for seven companies in the individual market with average rate changes ranging from a 3.2 percent decrease to an 8.9 percent increase, for an average increase of 1.5 percent. Under the decisions, Silver Standard Plan premiums for a 40-year-old in Portland would range from $436 to $530 a month.

The preliminary rates included reductions for HeathNet and Kaiser. The final decisions include reductions for Bridgespan (2.8 percent increase lowered to 1.4 percent) and Providence (2.1 percent increase down to 0.0 percent rate hold). Regence was the only company to see a rate increase moving from 3.9 percent to 5.5 percent.

The rate changes are company-wide averages based on premiums for plans before financial assistance through Oregon’s Health Insurance Marketplace is taken into account.

All Oregonians who purchase their own insurance are encouraged to apply for assistance through the Marketplace for 2020, even if they did not qualify last year. In 2019, Oregonians who received help with the costs of their health insurance paid on average $140 a month.

Open enrollment for 2020 plans is from Nov. 1 to Dec. 15.

Small group market 
In the small group market, the division issued final decisions for nine companies with average rates ranging from a 2.3 percent decrease to an 11.7 percent increase. Under the decisions, Silver Standard Plan premiums for a 40-year-old in Portland would range from $321 to $394 a month.

Final rates include reductions from the preliminary decisions for five of the nine small group insurance companies.

See the chart for the full list of final decisions.  

Insurance companies have 21 days to request a hearing before the final rates are set for 2020.

More information for each insurance company can be found at oregonhealthrates.org. A complete premium comparison table for each county based on ages 21, 40, and 60 will be posted online in August.

###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and www.dfr.oregon.gov.

 


Motor Vehicle Crash (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/15/19 3:43 PM
2019-07/5227/126103/1324.jpg
2019-07/5227/126103/1324.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/5227/126103/thumb_1324.jpg

MEDIA RELEASE  

Motor Vehicle Crash

 

Released by:          Sgt. K. Dizney

Release Date:        7/15/19

 

Driver #1:                Colburn, Edward                             Age:  62         Bend, OR

Vehicle #1:              Green Toyota Sequoia

 

Driver #2:                Voos, Susan                                    Age:  68         Bend, OR

Passenger:             Juvenile Male

Vehicle #2:              White Hyundai Elantra

 

Driver #3:                Dickerson, Theresa                        Age:  71         Bend, OR

Passenger:             Dickerson, Ronald L                      Age:  85         Bend, OR

Vehicle #3               Gray Cadillac SRX

 

NARRATIVE:

On Monday, 071519, at approximately 1202 hours, deputies with the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office began looking for a vehicle related to a traffic complaint that may have struck another vehicle in the area of Tumalo Road and Bend-Redmond Highway.  The vehicle was described as a green Toyota Sequoia SUV.  The driving associated with the green Toyota Sequoia was described as being a possible DUII while operating across the double yellow line and all over the roadway.   

 

While searching for the vehicle, deputies were dispatched to a motor vehicle crash involving this vehicle in the area of Deschutes Market Road and Chasing Cattle Lane.  Deschutes County 911 reported several vehicles were involved in the crash.  Deputies arrived within minutes and determined a rear end crash had occurred when the green Toyota Sequoia, traveling at speeds of approximately 45 mph (average for that time and place) failed to slow down for two vehicles that were traveling southbound on Deschutes Market Road following a tractor displaying a slow moving vehicle emblem.  The tractor and two mentioned cars following it were traveling at approximately 10-15 mph.  The Toyota Sequoia, operated by Edward Colburn, crashed into the back of a white Hyundai Elantra being operated by Susan Voos and her passenger, a juvenile male.  That caused a chain reaction causing Voos’ vehicle to impact into a Gray Cadillac SRX being operated by Theresa Dickerson and her passenger, Ronald Dickerson.  The crash caused extensive damage to the white Hyundai Elantra and required all three vehicles be towed from the scene due to damage. 

 

Deputies investigating the crash believe the cause of this crash is related to a medical issue being suffered by Edward Colburn operating the green Toyota Sequoia.  Bend Fire Medics were dispatched and transported Colburn to SCMC in Bend with unknown medical complications not related to the crash. 

 

Due to the slow moving traffic, speed is being investigated as a cause of this crash along with a medical condition.  Alcohol, drugs, or other distracted driving are not believed to be involved.  No one else was injured during the crash.    

 

Deschutes Market Road was not closed during this investigation. 

 

 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with four K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today lead by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

 

 

## End of Release ##

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-07/5227/126103/1324.jpg , 2019-07/5227/126103/1234.jpg

Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/15/19 3:16 PM
Llaneza
Llaneza
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/1070/126101/thumb_Llaneza.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Lindsey Llaneza, died the morning of July 15, 2019.  Llaneza was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI) in Umatilla, and passed away in the infirmary at TRCI. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified. 

Llaneza entered DOC custody on April 15, 2004, from Multnomah County with an earliest release date of June 23, 2021.  Llaneza was 65 years old. Next of kin has been notified.  

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state. 

TRCI is a multi-custody prison in Umatilla that houses approximately 1,800 adults in custody. TRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including institution and industrial laundry, mattress manufacturing, and sewing. Other institution work programs include repair and cleaning of irrigation ditches, maintenance of local baseball fields, and work with local cities and the Hermiston School District. The facility provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, religious services, and behavioral health services. TRCI opened in 2000.




Attached Media Files: Llaneza

Test Media Release
Bend Police Dept. - 07/15/19 2:11 PM

Test Media Release


Oregon Heritage Commission to meet July 28-29 in Baker City
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/15/19 8:00 AM

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet in Baker City July 28-29.  

On July 28, Commissioners will gather at 1:00 p.m. to tour heritage sites surrounding the historic downtown.

On July 29 a public business meeting will begin at 9 a.m. at the Geiser Grand Hotel at 1996 Main Street, Baker City, OR 97814. The agenda includes reports on 2018 grant and MentorCorps programs, long-term planning, approval of Cultural Trust partner funds, and reports by commissioners. 

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

Commission meetings are open to the public and their agendas include opportunities for public comment. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For more information and accessibility needs, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Oregon Heritage Commission Coordinator Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or eth.Dehn@oregon.gov">Beth.Dehn@oregon.gov.


Train vs pedestrian accident
Bend Police Dept. - 07/15/19 6:49 AM

Victim- BNSF Railway   240 SE Raiload St, Bend, OR

Suspect- Houser, Kyle Justin           23 year old Bend resident

Charges:  Criminal Trespass I

 

On 7-14-19 at about 1530 hours, Bend Police and Fire were dispatched to the BNSF Depot for a report of a train versus pedestrian accident.  Bend Police arrived on scene and determined Houser had been struck by a train, just east of the Depot.

Further investigation determined that Houser was walking on the tracks, northwest bound towards the Depot. He was listening to music with headphones covering his ears. A train approached the Depot from the southeast, also traveling northwest bound.

As the train came up behind Houser it continued to use its blow horn to worn Houser, who had his back to the train. Houser did not hear the train and was struck on the shoulder area of his body and thrown from the tracks. The train was eventually able to stop.

Houser was transported to St Charles via ambulance with non-life threatening injuries.