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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Mon. May. 25 - 11:04 pm
Mon. 05/25/20
Serious Injury Crash on Hwy 58 - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/25/20 8:14 PM
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On Monday, May 25, 2020 at approximately 12:15 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a serious injury crash on Hwy 58 near milepost 3.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a green Honda CRV, operated by Pamela Thompson (65) of Klamath Falls, was westbound when it struck the back of a (also westbound) silver Jeep Patriot operated by Brian Nicoson (46) of Cottage Grove.

Thompson was transported to the hospital with serious injuries.  The Honda CRV had been reported as a reckless driver before the crash. DUII is being investigated as a factor in the crash.  This is an ongoing investigation and all charges will be referred to the Lane County DA.

Nicoson was transported to the hospital with serious injuries.

OSP was assisted by Pleasant Hill Fire Department, Goshen Fire Department, and ODOT




Attached Media Files: 2020-05/1002/134667/photo_2.jpg , 2020-05/1002/134667/Photo_1.jpg

Injury Motorcycle Crash on Forest Service Road 23 (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/25/20 3:36 PM
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Released by:          Sgt. Nathan Garibay, Emergency Services Manager

Release Date:        3-25-2020

Driver #1:                Tavion Linett, 20 year old male, Bend Resident

Vehicle #1:              2003 Kawasaki Motorcycle  

NARRATIVE:

On the morning of May 23, 2020 the Bend Police Department was advised of a possible missing person from an address in the City of Bend.  During their investigation, Bend Police Officers determined the missing, Tavion Linett was last seen with friends in the Millican Valley (east of Bend).  He left them around 10 PM on May 22, 2020 to return home.  In the morning, it was determined Linett had not gone to work and did not appear to have made it home.

Bend Police Officers went to the area of Hwy 20 and FS Road 23 (Spencer Wells Road) to begin searching for Linett.  A Deschutes County Search and Rescue Deputy also responded to begin an initial search and investigation.  At approximately 9:30 AM, a family friend located Linett on FS Road 23 just south of Hwy 20.  Bend Police Officers and the Deputy responded to the scene along with Bend Fire and Rescue. 

It was determined that Linett left his party along FS Road 23 to head home.  After traveling a short distance (approximately ½ mile), he failed to negotiate a dog-leg curve and traveled off the roadway coming to rest off the road.  Linett had serious injuries and remained laying in the brush all night.  Due the nature of his injuries, Linett was flown to St. Charles Medical Center in Bend by AirLink.  Bend Police Officers remained on scene and assisted with the crash investigation.

Alcohol does not appear to be a factor.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with four K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today lead by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

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Attached Media Files: 2020-05/5227/134650/IMG9520451.jpg

Oregon reports 19 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 4 new presumptive cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 05/25/20 12:10 PM

May 25, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 19 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 4 new presumptive cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 148, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 19 new confirmed cases and 4 new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 3,949. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (4), Deschutes (1), Jackson (3), Josephine (1), Marion (4), Multnomah (5), Umatilla (1), Washington (5).

Notes:

  • Due to data reconciliation, 1 presumptive case had updated information and their case status was changed to not a case to reflect the new information.
  • A case originally reported as a Linn County case was later determined to be a Marion County case. The case count in Marion county includes the case to reflect this change. However, the case that moved from Linn County to Marion county is not reflected in the total of new cases statewide for today.

COVID-19 Weekly Report publication day changed: The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report will be released on Wednesdays, starting Wednesday May 27.

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Sun. 05/24/20
Oregon reports 43 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 3 new presumptive cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 05/24/20 12:01 PM

May 24, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 148 as of 12:01 a.m. today, the Oregon Health Authority reported.

Oregon Health Authority reported 43 new confirmed cases and 3 new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 3,927. The new cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Crook (2), Deschutes (6), Jackson (2), Lincoln (1), Linn (4), Marion (7), Multnomah (3), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (17), Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 148th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive on April 23 and died on May 10 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Notes:

  • Due to data reconciliation, one case originally reported as presumptive was determined not to be a case.
  • Due to data reconciliation, one case originally reported as hospitalized in the 50–59 age group and one case originally reported as hospitalized in the 60–69 age group were determined not to have been hospitalized.

Oregon Health Authority is now including a link to the Oregon COVID-19 Daily Update in the daily news release. The Daily Update is a detailed look at COVID-19 in Oregon, including testing data, hospital capacity, and cases broken down by demographic information such as age groups, gender, race and ethnicity.

Note: The COVID-19 weekly report will now be published on Wednesdays, rather than on Tuesdays, starting May 27.

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

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Fatal Crash on Hwy 22E - Linn County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/24/20 11:16 AM
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On Sunday, May 24, 2020 at approximately 1:29 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle collision on Hwy 22E near MP 64.5.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Subaru Legacy, operated by Brian Beveridge (48) of Scappoose, was traveling westbound on Hwy 22E and crossed into the eastbound lane and struck a Nissan Frontier operated by Matthew Baker (49) of Bend.

Beveridge sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.  

Baker was transported to the hospital with non life threatening injuries.

OSP was assisted by Detroit / Idanha Fire Department and ODOT    




Attached Media Files: 2020-05/1002/134659/20200524_061351.jpg

Sat. 05/23/20
Oregon reports 28 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 7 new presumptive cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 05/23/20 12:29 PM

May 23, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged and remains at 147 as of 12:01 a.m. today, the Oregon Health Authority reported today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 28 new confirmed cases and seven new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 3,888. The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (2), Clatsop (1), Crook (3), Deschutes (2), Jackson (1), Jefferson (1), Lane (1), Marion (10), Multnomah (4), Umatilla (2), Wallowa (1), Washington (6), Yamhill (1).

Notes:

  • The cutoff for data has changed to 12:01 a.m., which means the reporting period for this report was 16 hours. Subsequent reports will have the same data cutoff, so the reporting period will return to 24 hours.
  • Due to data reconciliation, three confirmed cases, one each originally reported in Jackson, Multnomah, and Washington counties, were determined not to be cases. They were subtracted from Friday’s state total, and the total number of cases in each county was reduced to reflect this change.
  • Due to data reconciliation, 10 presumptive cases had updated information and their case status was changed to reflect the new information.
  • Due to data reconciliation, one case originally reported in the 10–19 age group and one case originally reported in the 70–79 age group were determined not to be cases.

Oregon Health Authority is now including a link to the Oregon COVID-19 Daily Update in the daily news release. The Daily Update is a detailed look at COVID-19 in Oregon, including testing data, hospital capacity, and cases broken down by demographic information such as age groups, gender, race and ethnicity.

Note: The COVID-19 weekly report will now be published on Wednesdays, rather than on Tuesdays, starting May 27.

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 228 - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 05/23/20 10:34 AM

On Saturday, May 23, 2020 at approximately 12:15 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle collision on Hwy 228 near milepost 10, east of Brownsville. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford F-250 pickup, operated by Austyn Hillsman (21) of Junction City, was eastbound on Hwy 228  when it crossed into the westbound lane and struck a Honda Pilot operated by Caleb Simonis (19) of Sweet Home.

Simonis sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

There were two passengers in the Honda Pilot - a 16 year old female was transported by Life Flight to the hospital where she was pronounced deceased - a 15 year old female was transported by ground ambulance with serious injuries. 

Hillsman did not sustain serious injuries and was charged with Reckless Driving, Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants, and two counts of Criminally Negligent Homicide and lodged at the Linn County Jail.

OSP was assisted at the scene by Brownsville Fire Department, Sweet Home Fire Department, Albany Fire Department, Life Flight, ODOT and the Linn County Sheriffs Office. 


FBI Portland Honors Missing Children's Day (Preview for Monday)
FBI - Oregon - 05/23/20 9:00 AM

Law enforcement agencies across the country commemorate National Missing Children’s Day each year on May 25th. This year, the FBI is recognizing three long-term investigations involving Oregon children and one case from Southwest Washington. The FBI continues to partner with local law enforcement agencies to provide requested assistance and investigative support in each of these cases.

Kyron Horman disappeared from Skyline Elementary School on June 4, 2010. Kyron was seven years old at the time. Kyron’s “FBI Missing Person” poster can be found at https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/kidnap/kyron-richard-horman.

The FBI’s Portland Division is also recognizing two cases involving sisters Shaina Ashley Kirkpatrick and Shausha Latine Henson. Shaina was three years old and Shausha was just two months old when they disappeared on April 4, 2001. The girls were last seen with their mother en route to Sacramento, California. On April 29, 2001, their mother’s body was found outside of Fernley, Nevada, while the whereabouts of the two girls remain unknown. Shaina’s “FBI Missing Person” poster can be found at https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/kidnap/shaina-ashley-kirkpatrick. Shausha’s “FBI Missing Person” poster can be found at https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/kidnap/shausha-latine-henson.

A fourth case from Vancouver, Washington, involves Aranza Maria Ochoa Lopez. On October 25, 2018, Aranza’s biological mother allegedly removed her from a local mall. Her mother was taken into custody in September of 2019 in Puebla, Mexico. Investigators believe that Aranza may still be in Mexico. Aranza’s “FBI Missing Person” can be found at https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/kidnap/aranza-maria-ochoa-lopez.

In honor of this year’s Missing Children’s Day, the FBI has created an interactive map of all the cases featured on the national website. That map can be found at https://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/national-missing-childrens-day-2020-052120

More information regarding these children and others missing across the country can be found on the FBI’s website. If you have any information regarding a missing child, please contact your local FBI field office or your local police department or call 9-1-1. Tips may also be submitted to the FBI through tips.fbi.gov.

Child ID App

The FBI also recommends being prepared should the unthinkable ever happen to your child. Our Child ID app allows you to store photos and physical descriptions of your child on your smartphone. If your child ever goes missing, you can use the app to quickly send information to the authorities. (The FBI does not store or collect the photos or information you enter into the app. The data lives on your device unless you choose to send it to police in an emergency.) 

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Attached Media Files: Ochoa-Lopez poster , Henson poster , Kirkpatrick poster , Horman poster

Fri. 05/22/20
Corrected Release: School lands in Prineville to sell for $4.5 million
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 05/22/20 4:14 PM

Correction: The buyer name was incorrectly stated in the original release. It is Birch Infrastructure, PBLLC. 

The 159-acre parcel is industrial land with development potential for manufacturing, data, or other job-generating businesses

PRINEVILLE, Ore. – The sale of 159 state-owned acres in Prineville for $4.5 million will benefit Oregon’s public schools and potentially bring jobs to central Oregon.  

The Oregon Department of State Lands (DSL) and Birch Infrastructure, PBLLC have signed a sale agreement for the property, located on Millican Road south of the Prineville Airport. The property is school lands, managed to obtain the greatest benefit for Oregonians and their schools.

Working with the City of Prineville and other partners helped boost the property’s appeal, says DSL Director Vicki L. Walker. A land exchange with the adjacent property owner provided direct road access to the property. The city also annexed the state-owned property as industrial land, opening the possibilities for manufacturing, data centers, or other employment-oriented businesses. 

“The collaborative effort to increase the property’s potential has resulted in economic dividends,” says Walker. “The Common School Fund receives millions for distribution to Oregon’s school children, and more industrial land is ready to bring jobs to Prineville.”

Sale proceeds go to the Common School Fund, which sends twice-yearly distributions to Oregon’s K-12 public schools. Crook County School District received $284,821 in 2019.


Oregon reports 45 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 3 new presumptive cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 05/22/20 3:06 PM

May 22, 2020

Oregon reports 45 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 3 new presumptive cases, 2 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 147, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 45 new confirmed cases and three new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 3,864. The new cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (5), Clatsop (2), Curry (1), Jackson (3), Linn (2), Malheur (4), Marion (8), Multnomah (11), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (10).

Oregon’s 146th COVID-19 death is a 53-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on May 18 and died May 20, at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 147th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 25 and died May 8, at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Note: Due to data reconciliation, one presumptive case had updated information and their case status was changed to reflect the new information.

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

# # #


Oregon Air National Guard to Continue Air Force Salute Flyovers in Oregon UPDATE
Oregon Military Department - 05/22/20 2:14 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Air National Guard was scheduled to conduct multiple F-15 Eagle flyovers over hospitals and other locations in Northeastern Ore. today, as well as in Southwestern Ore. on Monday, May 25th. The flyovers are intended to salute Oregonians on the forefront of the COVID-19 pandemic, lift community morale during a time of severe health and economic impacts, and remember those brave service members who have paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

Due to weather and fuel constraints this morning, the Oregon Air National Guard pilots were unable to fly over the Wallowa Memorial Hospital in Enterprise, Ore. today. Weather en route to the Enterprise region necessitated the F-15s be rerouted, thus increasing their flying time and requiring more fuel than available to reach Enterprise as originally planned.

“Though we must always choose safety first in situations like these, we know the healthcare workers and citizens of Enterprise were waiting for us,” stated General Donna Prigmore, Commander of the Oregon Air National Guard. “We want them to know that the Oregon Air National Guard is committed to making their flyover happen this Monday, Memorial Day.”

The Wallowa Memorial Hospital flyover in Enterprise, Ore. has been rescheduled for Monday, May 25th at 12:05 p.m.

As previously released, the flyovers listed below are scheduled for Monday, May 25th and include previously approved Memorial Day flyover locations. Please note all times are approximate:

10:50 a.m.  Sky Lakes Medical Center, Klamath Falls, Ore.

10:58 a.m.  VA White City, Ore.

11:10 a.m.  VA Roseburg Health Care System, Roseburg, OR

11:10 a.m.  Mercy Medical Center, Roseburg, Ore.

11:18 a.m.  Peace Harbor Cottage Grove Community Med. Center, Cottage Grove, Ore.

11:22 a.m.  McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center, Springfield, Ore.

11:22 a.m.  Peace Harbor Medical Center at Riverbend, Springfield, Ore.

11:24 a.m.  Peace Harbor Sacred Heart Medical Center, Eugene, Ore.

11:40 a.m.  Peace Harbor Medical Center, Florence, Ore.

11:44 a.m.  Lower Umpqua Hospital, Reedsport, Ore.

12:00 p.m.  Asante Three Rivers Medical Center, Grants Pass, Ore.

12:00 p.m.  Grants Pass Riverside Park, Grants Pass, Ore.

12:05 p.m.  Wallowa Memorial Hospital, Enterprise, Ore.

12:10 p.m.  Brookings Harbor, Brookings, Ore.

Anyone living in and around these hospitals and other locations should see and hear the jets. People are encouraged to view the flights from the safety of their own homes and practice physical distancing.

The flyovers are a joint effort between Oregon’s 173d Fighter Wing, based in Klamath Falls, and the 142d Wing, based in Portland, aimed at supporting and thanking healthcare workers, first responders, and other essential workers who are working to keep Oregonians safe and healthy each day. The tribute also hopes to unify and boost the spirits of Oregonians and to recognize military members who have lost their lives in service to our country.

The flyovers have been coordinated as a part of OPERATION AMERICAN RESOLVE to salute those at the forefront of the COVID-19 response and will be done in conjunction with regularly scheduled training. Pilots must perform a minimum number of flight hours each month to maintain proficiency so these flyovers will contribute to training requiremenets. These flyovers will occur at no additional cost to taxpayers and are done in lieu of regularly scheduled training.

The Oregon Air National Guard F15s will fly at 2,000 feet above ground level, and at approximately 400 mph airspeed. Flights may be canceled, or times changed, due to inclement weather or operational contingencies.

Anyone who captures videos or photos of the F-15s flying overhead are encouraged to post on social media using the hashtags: #AirForceSalutes, #AFFlyover, #FlyoverFriday

The Oregon Air National Guard has been an integral part of the nation's air defense since 1941. Pilots from the 173d Fighter Wing and the 142d Wing train for a variety of mission skill sets in order to maintain combat readiness for the defense of our State and Nation. Additionally, the 142d Wing provides Aerospace Control Alert for the defense of our homeland 24/7, while the 173d FW is home to the sole F-15C pilot training facility for the United States Air Force. Both units also respond to state and national emergencies as directed by the Governor of Oregon.

Oregon Air National Guard Public Affairs Officer:  Captain Heather Bashor, 503-779-9889, .j.bashor.mil@mail.mil">heather.j.bashor.mil@mail.mil

173 FW Contact: Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar, 541-885-6677, son.j.thompson2.mil@mail.mil">jennifer.d.shirar.mil@mail.mil

142 WG Contact: Mr. Steve Conklin, 503-440-4434, steve.l.conklin2.mil@mail.mil


Farwest Show canceled due to COVID-19 pandemic
Oregon Association of Nurseries - 05/22/20 12:22 PM

An agricultural trade show that attracts 5,000 attendees to Oregon each year and represents the nursery and greenhouse industry — Oregon’s largest agricultural sector by sales — has been canceled due to COVID-19.

The 2020 Farwest Show had been scheduled for August 26–28 at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland, Oregon. The 2019 edition drew attendees from 44 states and 20 countries, including nursery and greenhouse operators, nursery industry suppliers, landscaping professionals, service providers, researchers, students and others. 

The loss of the 2020 show represents an economic hit for local hotels, restaurants and pubs, as well as to Oregon Association of Nurseries (OAN), the 501(c)6 nonprofit that produces it. 

The OAN serves Oregon’s $1 billion nursery and greenhouse industry, which leads the nation in production of coniferous evergreens, deciduous shade trees, deciduous flowering trees, cut Christmas trees. The state is #1 in bareroot nursery products, #1 in ball and burlap nursery products, and #3 in containerized nursery products.

“We are very disappointed not to be able to hold Farwest in 2020,” Farwest Show Chairman Patrick Newton of Powell’s Nursery Inc. (Gaston, Oregon) said. “Our show dates back to 1973 and is the biggest nursery trade show in the West. We know what Farwest means to the industry — it’s where nursery professionals from all over the region, the country and the world renew old connections, make new ones, gain new knowledge, advance their careers, find new customers and discover new plants and products. We will now focus on bringing the industry back together for a strong and vital show in 2021.”

OAN leaders initially held off making any decision on the 2020 Farwest Show. Instead, they waited to see how the pandemic might evolve, and how that might affect their ability to produce the show safely and successfully. 

However, on May 7, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown announced her phased plans for reopening Oregon for business and public life. Included was a stipulation that large public events may not take place in Oregon at least through the end of September, or until treatments or vaccinations for the coronavirus are available. As a result, the Oregon Convention Center determined it could not host the event as scheduled.

The OAN is currently reaching out to exhibitors, partners, sponsors, speakers and others connected with the show to communicate the decision and outline next steps.

“We had exciting plans for the 2020 show and will work hard to make the 2021 show even more exciting and useful,” OAN Director of Events Allan Niemi said. “We have a feeling that people will be more than ready to get together, do business, learn together and celebrate a renewal of the industry’s success.”


Columbia River Maritime Museum and Pacific Power Host "Mighty Miniboat Float" Live Events  
Pacific Power - 05/22/20 11:46 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                

Media Contact:
Lisa Scholin, 503-320-9379
lisa@noble-communications.com

 

Columbia River Maritime Museum and Pacific Power Host "Mighty Miniboat Float" Live Events  

Public invited to join this mini stay-at-home adventure

as part of Museum’s STEAM education program

 

ASTORIA, Ore., May 22, 2020 — We might not be traveling far these days, but a 5-foot long GPS-tracked miniboat, designed and launched by local students, sure is – as part of the Columbia River Maritime Museum’s Miniboat Program. On Friday, May 29, the public can join the adventure via livestream as the pint-sized vessel is launched into the mighty Columbia River. It’s the first in a series of three online distance learning events supported by Pacific Power that will follow the boat on its voyage between the Port of Vancouver to Astoria.

The Miniboat Program provides a one-of-a-kind educational opportunity that introduces students to ocean science, international exchange, and the STEAM fields of science, technology, engineering, the arts and math, helping to inspire future careers. Earlier this year, a fleet of seaworthy vessels cooperatively designed and built by participating elementary and middle school students was launched from the west coast. An identical fleet was launched by sister schools in Japan, ideally headed this way.

While those boats navigate to distant shores (you can track their progress here), the Museum, together with Pacific Power, is hosting a mini adventure closer to home. On Friday, May 29, 2020, they will launch the "Mighty Miniboat Float” events, open to all students and the public.

 

Participants can view the livestreamed series on the Museum’s Miniboat Facebook page and YouTube channel, and are encouraged to tune in starting at 11:45 a.m. More details are available on the Museum’s website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday, May 29, 12-1 p.m.: A Miniboat’s Big Adventure

The first livestream will cover the local miniboat launch near the Port of Vancouver, Washington, from a Shaver tugboat. The segment will continue with captivating, educational programming that introduces the miniboat phenomenon, weaving in STEAM concepts in an accessible way.

Friday, June 5, 12-1 p.m.: Thar She Blows!

The second livestream will introduce the role of wind and currents, as participants check in on the fleet and discuss the vessels’ progress.

Friday, June 12, 12-1 p.m.: The Mighty Columbia

The third livestream will explore how a working river…works, in a celebration of the industry and communities that depend on our region's biggest river. We’ll hear from bar pilots, ship captains, tugboat operators, and more about their real-river jobs.

 

The sessions will be hosted by Nate Sandel, education director, Columbia River Maritime Museum and Pacific Power’s Alisa Dunlap, community manager for the North Coast of Oregon. Student shipbuilders, representatives from the Columbia River Bar Pilots, Shaver Transportation, and other surprise guests will join in the engaging experience as they bring science to life.
 

“Miniboats have the power to create substantial and lasting impact, and we are delighted to bring their might into local homes to help inspire even more students and families,” said Sandel of the program and livestream. “We’ve seen these boats capture the imagination of our students, but also many people from around the world, who encounter the boats, help with a rescue, or simply follow the boats’ progress online. These livestream events will allow us to bring their magic to even more households.”

 

This is the third year of the museum’s Miniboat Program, with more than 59,000 nautical miles traveled to date. Pacific Power has supported the program this school year, providing mentorship in the classroom with company engineers helping to install solar onto a miniboat deck.  

One of this year’s boats, created by students at Wy’East Middle School in Vancouver, Washington washed ashore after its ocean launch earlier this year. The students will now give their boat a “second chance voyage” on the Columbia River, before it is eventually relaunched at sea.

 

“Witnessing these young students navigate their miniboat journey underscores the importance of trying, failing, and then trying again. It’s an essential part of the STEAM process,” says Pacific Power President and CEO Stefan Bird. “These students will become our future engineers, problem solvers, and leaders, and it’s why programs like this matter to Pacific Power and businesses across Oregon.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Through the Miniboat Program, students take on roles as quartermasters, sail designers, keel engineers, cargo trackers, and documentarians. Along the way, they learn real-world skills and make friends overseas while they track their boats online, which are packed with mementos curated by the students. 

 

“We have been honored to have a front-row seat in supporting this engaging curriculum, which offers an extraordinary way for students to learn crucial STEAM skills during the critical late-elementary and early middle school years,” said Dunlap. “We are proud of our role in helping them discover future career options, while building international connections that will last a lifetime.”

 

The Miniboat Program was developed by the Columbia River Maritime Museum in partnership with the Consular Office of Japan in Portland, Educational Passages, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and is supported by Pacific Power, the U.S. Coast Guard, and many others. The public can follow the miniboat adventures on Facebook at CRMM Miniboat Program or through the museum’s website at www.crmm.org.

 

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About the Miniboat Program from The Columbia River Maritime Museum
Following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, debris from the country washed up on Oregon and Washington shores. One of those items, a fishing vessel, is now on display at the Columbia River Maritime Museum. That boat and its journey across the Pacific Ocean became the inspiration for building the Miniboat Program. Since the program’s start in 2017, 1,213 students on both sides of the Pacific Ocean have been involved in the launch of 24 miniboats, traveling a total of 55,236 nautical miles (and climbing daily). These boats are tracked daily and students are still building on the skills they honed to launch them.

This year’s participants include 7th graders from Warrenton Grade School in Warrenton, Ore. and 5th graders at Columbia City Elementary School in Columbia City, Ore, along with the 7th graders from Wy’East Middle School in Vancouver, Wash. These three schools are partnered with three schools in Japan, including Tanesashi Primary School, Okuki Elementary, and Kanehama Elementary in Hachinohe City, in the Aomori Prefecture.  

About Pacific Power’s Support for STEAM Education
At Pacific Power, we know the importance of building a solid foundation of STEAM skills early to help open more doors for students and strengthen our communities. We are committed to building opportunities for STEAM education by supporting organizations like the Columbia River Maritime Museum and building opportunities that enrich the education of students of all ages – whether we are supporting the Miniboat Program in Astoria, INVENT in Grants Pass, visiting classrooms to provide mentorship, or providing distance learning opportunities.


Oregon Prepares for Aquatic Invaders with Rapid Response Exercise (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 05/22/20 11:00 AM
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On May 19 and 20, a Rapid Response Team of local, state and federal natural resource agencies, and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, convened for a virtual tabletop, scenario-based exercise in the event invasive quagga or zebra mussels are found in the Columbia River Basin.

The practice scenario involved a boat launching into Lake Billy Chinook after coming to the lake from mussel-infested Lake Pleasant, Arizona. In the scenario, the out-of-state boat launched and moored in a marina on the lake for 10 hours before the invasive mussels were detected. The exercise included monitoring and containment options ranging from facility closures, law enforcement assistance, and mandatory boat inspection/decontamination for boats leaving the waterbody.  

The Rapid Response Team activated a mock command center and rapid response for containment and explored the best mitigation options for the conditions.  There were several goals in conducting this proactive exercise: streamlining communication among action agencies, strengthening skills, improving response time and coordinating mussel containment actions.

Representatives from the Oregon State Marine Board, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon Department of Agriculture, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Portland General Electric, Invasive Species Action Network and the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, participated in the exercise.

“Oregon needs to practice a rapid response plan and act fast," said Glenn Dolphin, the Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator for the Oregon State Marine Board. “The question isn’t if the mussels contaminate the basin, but when.” Dolphin continued, “We need to have everything dialed in, including technology and communication, to the point where the group is a well-tuned machine with leadership and procedures in place, so everyone knows what role they play.”     

The Rapid Response Team took lessons-learned from neighboring states and the measures they’ve implemented to improve response through policy and planning during previous exercises.

“These types of exercises help reveal areas that might be missing or that might need to be strengthened in Oregon’s Rapid Response plan in order to be successful in an eradication effort. This is why it is important to have exercises and to work with various partners. Their expertise on the species and knowledge of the area is very valuable to successful eradication efforts,” says Rick Boatner, Invasive Species, Wildlife Integrity Supervisor for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. “If you miss your window of opportunity for whatever reason, the mussels will take over an entire ecosystem and now you are dealing with containment and control, which is far more expensive and drastically increases the chance that the mussel will expand into more areas around the state,” adds Boatner.

“We are proud to be a part of this multi-agency, long-term, and proactive approach to invasive species prevention in the Columbia River Basin,” said Dr. Theresa Thom, Regional Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “Our successes and lessons learned are being used to inform other rapid response efforts across the nation.”

Mandatory boat inspection stations in Oregon are the first line of defense, but most are only open seasonally during daytime hours, with Ashland and Ontario stations open year-round. Recreational boaters can help protect waterways with three simple steps: Clean, Drain, Dry their boat after every use. In 2020, all boaters are also now required to “pull the plug” and empty any water-holding compartments when leaving a waterbody and during transit. 

The Marine Board and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife co-manage Oregon’s Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Program. Non-motorized boats 10 feet long and longer are required to purchase and carry a Waterway Access Permit and non-resident motorboat owners must purchase an out-of-state aquatic invasive species permit (AIS).

A portion of the Waterway Access Permit, all of the out-of-state AIS permit fees, as well as a portion of Oregon’s motorized boat registration fees help fund the program. The revenue pays for aquatic invasive species inspection stations, decontamination equipment, staffing, law enforcement, and outreach materials. 

For more information about aquatic invasive species permits and to purchase a permit, visit: https://myodfw.com/articles/waterway-access-and-aquatic-invasive-species-permits.

Learn more about aquatic invaders and see boat inspection reports at: https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/boater-info/Pages/Aquatic-Invasive-Species-Program.aspx.

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Attached Media Files: 2020-05/4139/134625/2020AISLAWS_WEB.jpg , Fouled boat with mussel contamination , Lake Billy Chinook Cove Palisades (Crooked River)

Pacific Power continues to reduce wildfire risk
Pacific Power - 05/22/20 8:52 AM

The company has increased inspections, weather monitoring and invested in new technologies to protect communities

PORTLAND, Ore. (May 22, 2020) – With wildfire season already underway in parts of the West, Pacific Power is adding new safety measures and system enhancements to continue to help protect the communities it serves while providing safe, reliable power.

“While it is impossible to eliminate all wildfire risks, we continue to invest in our system in high-risk areas to reduce the chance of utility-caused, catastrophic wildfires during extreme weather” said David Lucas, vice president of transmission and distribution operations. “We continue to upgrade our system to mitigate wildfire risk, protect people and property and increase equipment resiliency. This essential work and investment underscores our continued commitment to doing our part in the evolving preventative fight against wildfires.”

Last year, in addition to regular inspection schedules, crews performed 20,000 extra facility inspections system-wide. Other mitigation measures include:

  • Investing in new technologies, such as covered overhead wire to prevent sparks from occurring when debris or branches fall into the line
  • Installing dozens of weather monitoring stations throughout high risk wildfire areas for deeper insight into weather-related threats
  • Enhanced plant and tree clearings around power lines and poles in high risk areas
  • Coordinating with state and local government officials and forestry management groups and other stakeholders to help ensure public safety

Pacific Power recently released an easy-to-use interactive map to view areas where a Public Safety Power Shutoff (PSPS) may occur – rare instances when power could be proactively shut off in specific, high-risk areas to prevent wildfire ignitions. Customers can see if a home or business is in a potential PSPS area and view the seven-day status forecasts in these designated zones. These tools help customers stay informed and provide actionable information so they can be prepared and stay safe during wildfire season. Additional resources, along with the web tools are available at pacificpower.net/wildfiresafety.

For more information on the company’s wildfire prevention practices, customers can attend Pacific Power’s Wildfire Mitigation and Safety webinar on May 27, 2020 at 5:00 p.m.

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About Pacific Power

Pacific Power provides safe and reliable electric service to more than 773,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet customers’ growing electricity needs while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity providers in the United States. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net.

 


Four facts about Child Welfare during the COVID-19 pandemic
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/22/20 8:39 AM

(Salem, Ore.) – The COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact daily life in Oregon, yet there are stable foundations and values which guide the work to support children and families during these difficult times.

Much of the way the Oregon Department of Human Services, Child Welfare Program works has changed to keep people safe and well. The pace of information and change is rapid and there have been rumors and misinformation causing confusion in the community about the actions of the Child Welfare Program.

Four facts about the work of the Child Welfare Program during the COVID-19 pandemic follow:

Fact #1: The Oregon Child Abuse Hotline is open and child abuse and neglect assessments are still being done in person.

The Oregon Child Abuse Hotline is still answering calls 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year, and Child Welfare staff will continue to respond to reports of abuse and neglect, and work with community partners to maintain support to families.

The COVID-19 pandemic creates many challenges for families, which could impact child safety, including:

  • Economic instability
  • Lack of access to medical care
  • Limited access to regular meals due to school closures
  • Increased mental health issues  

The Child Welfare Program encourages Oregonians to check in with families in their community-- including young children, children and adults with developmental delays or other medical vulnerabilities, isolated children and families, and youth and families with severe emotional/mental health needs – through phone, email, or by safe distance, and provide support and resources when this can safely be done. Dropping off groceries, diapers, or sharing information about 211 can make a big difference in a family's wellbeing. 

 Anyone with concerns about potential neglect or abuse should report it to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline at 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).

Fact #2: In-person visits between children in foster care and their biological parents are still happening, even during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Oregon Child Welfare Program is allowing in-person visits to happen in the community with special considerations. These considerations include the health of children, foster parents, parents, and if caseworkers agree there are no health-related concerns around visits and enough room to practice physical distancing.

Sometimes, in-person visits are not able to occur. In these situations, Child Welfare is modifying plans to allow frequent and meaningful phone and virtual contact between families of origin and children; as well as siblings that are not together.

Children of all ages, even babies, benefit from seeing their parents via videoconferencing hearing their voices by phone. Parents also greatly benefit from this contact. When frequent and meaningful contact is maintained, even virtually, parents are more motivated to stay engaged in their case plan and children do better. 

On March 24, 2020 in-person visits at DHS offices were suspended. Since then they have been allowed in the community when possible. The decision regarding in-person visits at DHS offices will be reconsidered in June.

Fact #3: Oregon Child Welfare will not place children in foster care because their parents or caregivers are diagnosed with COVID-19.

There are times when a caregiver is unable to care for their child due to severe illness. In these cases, if the caregiver requests it and when there is no one else who is able to provide a safe environment for the child, it might be necessary for the child to enter foster care until the caregiver's health allows them to care for the child again.

This would only be done on a voluntary basis and if the caregiver needed and requested it. The Oregon Child Welfare Program would first work with the caregiver to identify any potential friends or family that can provide a safe and caring environment for the child before making the decision that entering foster care was necessary. This type of voluntary placement does not affect a caregiver's custodial rights and does not involve the child dependency legal system.

A parent or other primary caregiver having a severe illness, including COVID-19, would never be the sole reason for removing a child in Oregon.

Parents or other primary caregivers are encouraged to plan ahead and identify a circle of support made up of friends, family, and their community who can provide assistance in case of emergency.

Fact #4: Not following Governor Brown’s Stay Home, Save Lives executive order or not following physical distancing guidelines would never be a reason for a Child Protective Services (CPS) assessment.

When the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline receives a report of suspected abuse or neglect, that report is screened, and then if assigned for a CPS safety assessment, case workers will visit the family and do a safety assessment.

This assessment is very thorough and involves assessing all the factors within the family that can impact the safety of the child. Our caseworkers do a thorough assessment of who is in the home, parenting practices, vulnerability of the child, and much more.

Political activity, protests or beliefs are never a reason to assign a CPS assessment. Additionally, refusing to follow physical distancing guidelines or the Stay Home, Save Lives executive order are never reasons to assign a CPS assessment.

For additional resources and information:

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Fatal Crash on Hwy 212 - Clackamas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/22/20 7:20 AM
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On Thursday, May 21, 2020 at approximately 3:15 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 212 at Lani Lane. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a Toyota Landcruiser, operated by Donna Chaney (72) of Boring, was traveling eastbound on Hwy 212 when it drifted into the westbound lane colliding head on with a Honda Accord operated by Michael Laubach (44) of Tigard.

Laubach sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Chaney did not sustain serious injuries and is cooperating with the investigation.

OSP was assisted by Clackamas County Sheriff's Office, Clackamas County Fire Department and Boring Fire Department.




Attached Media Files: 2020-05/1002/134616/20200521_160935.jpg , 2020-05/1002/134616/20200521_161128.jpg

Fatal Crash on Hwy 99E - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 05/22/20 6:57 AM

On Thursday May 21, 2020 at approximately 10:01 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a motor vehicle crash on Hwy 99E and SE Claredon St. in Gladstone.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a silver Mercedes G25, operated by David Mauerman (59) of Oregon City, was traveling southbound on Hwy 99E when he struck a pedestrian, Michael Lacy (61) of Oregon City, that was in the lane of travel. 

Lacy sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased while en route to the hospital by ambulance.

Hwy 99E was closed for 2.5 hours following the crash.

OSP was assisted by Gladstone Police Department and Clackamas Fire Department.  


Shooting Investigation - Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 05/22/20 6:41 AM

On Thursday May 21, 2020 at approximately 10:00 A.M., Oregon State Police  and Josephine County Sheriff's Office responded to the 900 block of Caves Highway for report of a deceased male.

Responding officers located Devin Tandy (43) deceased from a gunshot.

Tandy's vehicle was not at the residence and investigators requested an attempt to locate (ATL) on the vehicle by all law enforcement. 

California Highway Patrol and Del Norte County Sheriff's office located the vehicle and detained the driver - Deymon Edwards (22).

OSP detectives responded to the Del Norte County Sheriff's office and interviewed Edwards. 

Edwards was lodged in the Del Norte County jail on Murder I, Burglary I, Robbery I, Unlawful Use of a Vehicle and Theft I.

This is an ongoing investigation


Shepherd's House to Celebrate Graduation of 12 of their Residents!! (Photo)
Shepherd's House Ministries - 05/22/20 5:00 AM
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Shepherd’s House Ministries is pleased to announce three women and nine men in their long-term program have reached the graduation milestone. Shepherd’s House is so proud of these individuals and the hard work they have put into their recovery. Ceremonies will be held Friday, May 22 at 4:30 at our Division Street location.

Join us in congratulating these amazing individuals!!!

 

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Attached Media Files: 2020-05/3949/134611/Graduation.jpg

Thu. 05/21/20
Fatal Crash on Hwy 180 - Lincoln County
Oregon State Police - 05/21/20 7:22 PM

On Thursday May 21, 2020, at approximately 8:07 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Hwy 180 (Nashville Rd.) at milepost 1.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford F350, operated by William Coolbaugh (63) of Eddyville, was traveling eastbound on Hwy 180(Nashville Rd.) when for unknown reasons the F350 drove over the embankment on the south side of the roadway and crashed upside down in the Yaquina River. 

Coolbaugh sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. 

An 11 year old male passenger also sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Other passengers Jacob Roberts (37) of Eddyville and a 15 year male were transported for injuries.  

Hwy 180 (Nashville Rd.) was closed for approximately 6 hours following the crash. 

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Lincoln County Sheriff's Office and Toledo Fire and Rescue.

   


OHA corrects weekly report data
Oregon Health Authority - 05/21/20 5:53 PM

May 21, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA corrects weekly report data

The Oregon Health Authority published incorrect data in a table that shows percentages for people with risk factors in all COVID-19 cases in Oregon in the COVID-19 Weekly Report. The data include several categories: persons who had contact with a confirmed case; persons in congregate living settings; health care workers; direct patient care providers, persons who travelled out of the area and persons with underlying conditions.

The data reported accurate numbers of cases, however there was no change in the reported percentages, due to an error. The reports were published on OHA’s COVID-19 website for April 21, 28 and May 5.

The weekly report is a comprehensive surveillance report on COVID-19 that is published every Tuesday. The COVID-19 Weekly Reports with incorrect risk factors are being revised to reflect the correct data.

In the weekly report for May 19, included incorrect totals for numbers of cases and deaths in congregate care facilities. An updated version of the report is here.


Commission Builds on Efforts to Reduce GHG Emissions, Receives Regulated Utilities' Wildfire Mitigation Update
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 05/21/20 5:11 PM

SALEM, Ore. – Earlier today, the Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) received an update on wildfire mitigation efforts and planning from regulated electric utility service providers, building on past work to address wildfire risk and marking an initial step to meet the directives established in Governor Brown’s Executive Order 20-04 related to wildfires. Today’s updates from PacifiCorp, Portland General Electric, and Idaho Power are part of an ongoing dialogue with the PUC to share perspectives and evolving approaches to the rapidly changing wildfire risk in order to protect Oregon communities and critical infrastructure.

Executive Order 20-04 directed the PUC to evaluate wildfire protection plans and activities of regulated electric utilities to improve safety, reduce risks, and promote electric system resilience. It also directed the PUC to convene workshops to develop and share emerging best practices for mitigating wildfire risk. The PUC’s efforts to meet these directives builds on work completed last summer, including hosting of a wildfire mitigation event with utility commissions and experts from British Columbia, California, Idaho, Nevada, Washington, and Oregon to share regional best practices and expertise. Also last year, the PUC asked the regulated utilities to report on wildfire mitigation efforts. Today’s update was a follow-up to last year’s activities.

 “Today provided an opportunity to explore the progress and learning that has happened in the last year and understand the priorities for this fire season, a season complicated by the COVID public health emergency,” said Letha Tawney, PUC Commissioner.

The utilities addressed their risk methodology, regional mitigation coordination, asset inspection, vegetation management, public safety power shut-offs, inspection and maintenance, metrics to determine effectiveness, community outreach and education, and more.

Tawney added, “Our next steps will include opportunities for broader stakeholder participation and engagement, including state and local emergency planners, local governments, and communities impacted by wildfires. Additionally, the PUC will partner with all operators of electric systems throughout Oregon to further discuss best practices to better equip all utilities to effectively and continuously adapt to changing wildfire risk.”

To view the presentations provided by Oregon Department of Forestry and Bonneville Power Association, and the wildfire mitigation updates provided by PacifiCorp, PGE, and Idaho Power, visit: https://oregonpuc.granicus.com/DocumentViewer.php?file=oregonpuc_cd21c23bbb16773d47212b29cc4d16b1.pdf&view=1.

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The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) regulates customer rates and services of the state’s investor-owned electric, natural gas and telephone utilities, as well as select water companies. The PUC mission is to ensure Oregon utility customers have access to safe, reliable, and high quality utility services at just and reasonable rates, which is accomplished through thorough analysis and independent decision-making conducted in an open and fair process.

 


Parent Advisory Council Provides Mentorship, Support and Insight
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/21/20 4:53 PM

May is National Foster Care Awareness month, and this year’s theme is “Foster Care as a Support to Families, Not a Substitute for Parents.”

When biological and foster families work together for successful reunification of children in care, everyone involved experiences long-term benefits. Communication between these families plays a crucial role in creating the support, resilience, and connection that children in care need and deserve.

In Oregon, the Parent Advisory Council (PAC) models this by mentoring parents with children in care and changing the stigma around family communication.

The PAC, facilitated by Morrison Child & Family Services, is composed of seven parents who have successfully navigated their own Oregon Child Welfare cases. The Oregon Foster Parent Association is also a member, working to increase positive relationships between foster families and parents in Oregon.

Says Rebecca Jones Gaston, Oregon Child Welfare Program Director, “All children deserve love and support. The Parent Advisory Council and Oregon Foster Parent Association reflect what we know works for children and society’s long-term success. By supporting families working together and building a strong child safety network, we can strengthen communities.”

The PAC believes that foster families play a vital role in healing families and successful reunification and recently developed a training to teach foster families best practices for collaboration from the parent perspective.

When the PAC was unable to provide in-person training due to the COVID-19 pandemic, PAC parents stepped up to deliver it virtually to foster families across Oregon.

"The humility, support and ongoing mentoring that my resource (foster) family provided me was imperative to my success as a parent and the reunification of my family", says Daniel Pallas, PAC member since 2016.

Here are five proven suggestions for foster families from parents who have successfully worked through child welfare cases:

1) Communication is key: Children pick up on the way foster families communicate with their parents. Encourage a healthy parent-child relationship by modeling a healthy co-parenting relationship and use creative communication tools such as journals or photos.

2) Transitions matter: Ease the pain and trauma for the child and parent when they are separated by allowing them a phone call on the first night and advocating for an early "icebreaker" meeting to make a co-parenting plan.

3) Small acts have big impacts: Some ideas include: asking for the child's special belongings and cultural practices, putting up pictures of the parents in the child's room even if they are an infant, and referring to the child's parents as "mom" and "dad."

4) Work as a team: Unity and consistency in co-parenting supports the immediate and long-term wellbeing of children. When parents and foster families work together, children experience less detachment, increased attachment resilience, and supportive transitions home.

5) Have hope: Parents can and do change. No matter how challenging things seem right now, every parent loves their child. Convey your hope to the parent! Tell them YOU believe they can change, too.

For more information about the Parent Advisory Council, please contact the Council Facilitators: Brittany Kintigh (971) 803-1804 or Leah Hall (503) 313-8959.


 

 


Office of State Fire Marshal Ends Rules Change Allowing Self-Serve Gas in Some Counties
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 05/21/20 4:40 PM

The Office of the State Fire Marshal’s temporary rules change allowing Oregon gas retailers to provide self-service on a voluntary basis ends at midnight, May 23.

Starting May 24, attendants will again be providing service at gas stations in Oregon where self-service is not allowed. Self-service is allowed in some coastal counties and in eastern and central Oregon.

Initially, a temporary rules change was implemented to address worker shortages at stations statewide because of COVID-19.

“We want to thank Oregonians and the many Oregon businesses who provide gasoline for their patience as we allowed for voluntary self-service at Oregon gas stations where that service had not been available before,” said State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. “Starting Sunday, self-serve gas will no longer be allowed in counties where it is already prohibited by state law. Areas of the state where self-serve was allowed, in some coastal counties and areas of central and eastern Oregon, will see no change.”

Information about the ending of temporary self-serve gas in certain parts of the state can be found on the OSFM website.


Oregon reports 24 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 0 new presumptive cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 05/21/20 4:17 PM

May 21, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 24 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 0 new presumptive cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 145, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 24 new confirmed cases and no new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 3,817. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Coos (1), Deschutes (1), Jefferson (1), Malheur (3), Marion (4), Multnomah (8), Umatilla (3), Washington (3).

Oregon’s 145th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Polk County, who tested positive on May 2 and died on May 20 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Note: Due to data reconciliation, two confirmed cases originally reported in Josephine County were determined not to be cases. They were subtracted from Wednesday’s state total, and the total number of cases in Josephine County went down to reflect this change.

Eight presumptive cases also were updated and their case status was changed to reflect the new information (five suspect, three confirmed).

Today, OHA will provide a Public Health Indicators Dashboard to enable communities across Oregon to monitor COVID-19 in the state.

The dashboard, which will be updated weekly on Thursdays, provides a transparent report that presents complex epidemiological data in an interactive, easy-to-understand way.

The dashboard displays three key indicators:

  • COVID-19 disease
  • Severe COVID-19 burden
  • Active Monitoring Capacity

 

All are key to monitoring the progress of the “stop, watch and redirect” process for determining progress in the phased reopening of the state. The indicators include emergency room visits, hospitalizations and active monitoring.

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon Board of Forestry hosts virtual public meeting on June 3
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/21/20 3:58 PM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, June 3. In compliance with Gov. Kate Brown’s directive on social distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19, this will be a virtual public meeting.

The meeting agenda includes:

  • Approval of the forest protective association and district budgets
  • Approval of the rangeland fire protection association budgets
  • Approval of the agency’s budget policy options packages
  • Evaluation of the Board’s authority and constraints on climate change policy
  • A request for a temporary rule in the Siskiyou geo-region
  • An update on fire season readiness
  • A summary of public comments received for the 2021 State Forests Annual Operation Plans
  • A presentation of the agency’s administrative dashboards and services

View the agenda for additional topics to be discussed at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

The meeting will be livestreamed and public comment will be accepted. The live testimony is reserved for Board decision items (Items 2 through 5). Written testimony can be submitted before or after the meeting to oardofForestry@oregon.gov">BoardofForestry@oregon.gov. Please note which item you are providing testimony on. The live testimony instructions, board packet, and livestream option are available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

The Board will also hold an executive session, pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(i), to review and evaluate the state forester’s performance. The executive session will also be conducted virtually. Members of the news media wishing to view the meeting can email Public Affairs Director Joy Krawczyk at awczyk@oregon.gov">joy.p.krawczyk@oregon.gov for information.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/aboutbof.aspx.


Sharing the Waterways When Boating Improving Safety, Reducing Conflict Begins with You (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 05/21/20 3:00 PM
Play it safe where there are mixed-use waterways.
Play it safe where there are mixed-use waterways.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-05/4139/134592/thumb_PlayitSafe.jpg

The Oregon State Marine Board offers a different message this year heading into Memorial Day Weekend, and it’s not just about safety. It’s about courteous behavior and recognizing that everyone on the water impacts each other.

Apply the “Golden Rule” and Understand Boating Needs of Others for Safety:

  • Wherever paddlers are, motorized boat operators need to pay special attention to their speed, wake, and proximity to others. Let the paddler know you see them by changing course, speed, or using sound signaling.
  • Paddlers are encouraged to stick together in your party (maintain a distance of 6 feet from others) and venture out into deeper or wider waterways ONLY when skill level and safety allow.
  • Like any road with a crosswalk, paddlers are encouraged to cross river channels at 90-degree angles and make sure they have enough time to paddle across the waterbody safely and not impede motorboat traffic flow.
  • When a motorboat operates “on plane,” at a faster speed, the boat may actually produce a smaller wake than at lower speeds. On shallow rivers, motorboats must remain on plane or risk grounding. Paddlers should keep their ears primed for the sound of a motorboat approaching and give way. Motorboat operators should be ready to steer clear or alter speed and signal to the other boaters that they are seen.

All boaters can do their part:

  • It’s every boater’s responsibility to learn and follow the navigation “rules of the road.”
  • Be mindful and conscious of your activity’s impact on others. At the boating facility, avoid congregating at the ramp or docks. Be efficient in launching and retrieving your boat.
  • Be a good neighbor and look out for one another. If you see another boater in need, stop and render aid if you’re safely able to do so and stay on-scene until everyone is safe. Not only is this a courteous thing to do, but it’s also the law.
  • Know your limits. Where there are a lot of people recreating, evaluate your skill level with the other activities, and gauge whether or not to do your activity in that location. Evaluate the level of risk due to COVID-19. Find a local area boat ramp to access the water. If it’s crowded, try again another day when it's less busy. If you’re new to boating, you may want to find a different waterbody nearby to hone your boating skills before venturing out into more densely populated waterways. Go with a more experienced friend or paddling club. This applies to both motorized boaters and paddlers.
  • “See something, say something.” If someone is operating recklessly, take note of the make, model, and if possible, the boat’s OR number and file an electronic report. The Marine Board can follow up with a notice to Marine Law Enforcement.
  • If you’re involved in a boating accident that involves an injury or property damage exceeding $2,000, you must report the incident to the Marine Board. A Boating Incident Report Form must be submitted within 48 hours of an injury or death and within 10 days of an accident causing property or equipment damage only.

Boating Safety for Memorial Day Weekend:

  • Wear a life jacket. Make sure everyone is wearing a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket. New innovative styles provide mobility and flexibility during water activities.
  • Check equipment. Make sure you have and know how to use all the essential safety equipment.
  • Make a float plan. Let family and friends know where you’re going and when you will return.
  • Use an engine cutoff device. An engine cutoff device is a proven safety device to stop the boat’s engine should the operator unexpectedly fall overboard.
  • Watch the weather. Always check the forecast before departing on the water and frequently during your excursion.
  • Know what’s going on around you at all times. Nearly a quarter of nationally reported boating accidents in 2018 were caused by operator inattention or improper lookout.
  • Know where you’re going and travel at safe speeds. Familiarize yourself with local boating proximity rules and slow -no wake zones and always travel at a safe speed. See the regulations here.
  • Never boat under the influence. A BUII is involved in one-third of nationwide recreational boating fatalities. This includes alcohol, marijuana, prescription drugs, and inhalants.
  • Keep in touch. Cell phones, satellite phones, EPIRB or personal locator beacon, and VHF radios can all be important devices in an emergency.
  • Please follow COVID-19 guidelines for boating access sites (boat ramps, boarding docks, parking areas, etc.).

All boaters need to operate in a safe manner, be courteous to other users, share the water, and Take Care Out There.

For more resources, visit www.boatoregon.com.

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Attached Media Files: Play it safe where there are mixed-use waterways.

Canadian National Sentenced to Federal Prison for Maritime Possession of Methamphetamine
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/21/20 2:06 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—John Philip Stirling, 66, a Canadian citizen, was sentenced today to 40 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release for possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine under the Maritime Drug Law Enforcement Act (MDLEA).

According to court documents, on April 9, 2019, while on a routine patrol, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Alert detected a sailing vessel traveling north, from Mexico to Canada, 225 nautical miles from Newport, Oregon in international waters. The vessel, named Mandalay, had a home port of Seattle, Washington. When Coast Guard personnel attempted to communicate with Stirling, he would only respond via VHF radio. Once Coast Guard personnel determined the Mandalay was a vessel within the jurisdiction of the U.S., they boarded and found Stirling to be the vessel’s sole occupant.

Stirling stated he did not have vessel documentation and refused to produce identification. Upon further questioning, Stirling’s speech began to deteriorate and he displayed signs of a possible drug overdose. Shortly before Coast Guard personnel boarded the vessel, Stirling consumed a large amount of what he believed to be pure fentanyl, but was later determined to be pentobarbital. Coast Guard personnel administered medical aid to Stirling and evacuated him by helicopter to Astoria, Oregon. He was later transported by ambulance to Adventist Health Portland for additional treatment.

The Mandalay was towed to port and later searched pursuant to a federal warrant. Investigators searched the vessel and discovered 28 jugs containing more than seven gallons of liquid methamphetamine each and a duffel bag containing several plastic-wrapped bricks of pentobarbital. Investigators later learned the drugs had been loaded onto the Mandalay from another vessel in the Sea of Cortez for delivery to Canada.

On January 13, 2020, Stirling pleaded guilty to one count of possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine under the MDLEA.

This case was investigated by the U.S. Coast Guard Investigative Service (CGIS) and Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) with assistance from U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

The year 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the Department of Justice. Learn more about the history of our agency at www.Justice.gov/Celebrating150Years.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation Available in Oregon
Oregon Employment Department - 05/21/20 2:00 PM

Starting today, the Oregon Employment Department is providing unemployment benefits through the CARES Act Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) program. PEUC is a 13-week extension of Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits for claimants who have run out of regular benefits.

PEUC provides the same weekly amount as a claimant’s regular benefit amount. Individuals receiving PEUC also are eligible to receive the $600 weekly Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation benefit for each eligible week between March 29 and July 25, 2020. PEUC is retroactive to March 29, 2020, the first payable week of the program, and lasts for up to 13 eligible weeks of benefits through December 26, 2020.

Eligibility
There are two ways to be eligible for PEUC benefits. The first is if someone has used up all benefits from a current claim for regular unemployment benefits, but the period of the claim has not expired, and a person does not have another regular unemployment claim available to them in another state. The second is if someone was unemployed, ran out of regular unemployment benefits after July 1, 2019, and a person does not have another regular unemployment claim available to them in another state.

Those eligible for regular unemployment benefits are not eligible for PEUC until those other benefits are exhausted.

How to Apply
We cannot accept your application for PEUC until you have run out of benefits, or unless your claim is expired. There are three ways to apply for PEUC:

  • Online Claim System – If you have exhausted your regular unemployment benefits, your claim has not expired, and you file weekly using our Online Claims System, you will be presented with an option to file for PEUC when you submit your weekly claim for the first week with a $0 balance. If you select this option, you will automatically be placed into the PEUC program. Make sure you continue filing a claim for benefits each week.
  • Secure Upload – If your claim for regular unemployment benefits already expired and you are eligible for PEUC, you will receive a letter from us instructing you how to complete the PUEC application and how to restart your claim. You can apply using the secure upload.
  • Mail – If you are eligible for PEUC but cannot access our electronic systems you can mail your application. The application is available here on the CARES Act page of our website or by calling 503-947-1563 and leaving a message requesting an application.

More PEUC information and application materials can be found on the CARES Act page.

 

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-05/930/134586/05.21.20_Pandemic_Emergency_Unemployment_Compensation_News_Release_FINAL.pdf

The Oregon Department of Corrections reports in-custody death with COVID-19
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 05/21/20 1:07 PM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died on May 20, 2020. He was incarcerated at the Oregon State Penitentiary and passed away at a hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19. He was between 50 and 60 years old. Next of kin has been notified. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death.

As of today, DOC has 38 employees who have tested positive and 148 AICs. For more information on cases, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,500 adults in custody who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state.

Institutions are cleaning numerous times a day, including disinfecting housing units, bathrooms, eating areas, doors, stairwells, countertops, etc. Posters have been placed in all DOC institutions encouraging adults in custody to wash hands frequently for at least 20 seconds, to cough and sneeze into their elbow, and to avoid touching their face. Institutions have placed handwashing stations at entrances for staff before entry. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities.

At the beginning of April, Oregon Corrections Enterprises (OCE) began manufacturing utility masks at Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution, Two Rivers Correctional Institution, and Coffee Creek Correctional Facility. These masks are designed to reduce the amount of droplets expelled from a person’s cough or sneeze. Every AIC has been offered two masks and employees offered one.

DOC is identifying the especially vulnerable population within the institutions and intensifying the efforts to reduce potential exposure and transmission. If an AIC becomes ill and exhibits flu like symptoms, then CDC and OHA guidance for supportive care will be followed.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 99 - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/21/20 11:07 AM
2020-05/1002/134578/20200521_031307.jpg
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On Thursday, May 21, 2020 at approximately 2:10 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel  responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 99 near milepost 5, Creswell, OR.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Honda Accord, operated by John Farrell (42) of Cottage Grove, was northbound on Hwy 99 when it left the roadway and damaged approximately 100 feet of a wood fence.  

Farrell was transported to River Bend Hospital.

A passenger in the Honda, Elizabeth Slagley (31) from Cottage Grove, sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by Lane County Sheriff’s Office and ODOT.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-05/1002/134578/20200521_031307.jpg

Disruption in weekly routine draws Win for Life jackpot (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 05/21/20 10:48 AM
2020-05/4939/134580/Charlene_Ascher_press_release.jpg
2020-05/4939/134580/Charlene_Ascher_press_release.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-05/4939/134580/thumb_Charlene_Ascher_press_release.jpg

May 21, 2020 - Salem, Ore. – Charlene Ascher of Portland has a weekly routine. Each Sunday she purchases her Lottery tickets for the week at a local restaurant and then checks them as the drawings happen. With the recent business closures, Ascher had to purchase her weekly games at the convenience store down the street instead.

“If I would have skipped, I wouldn’t have won Win for Life!” Ascher said. “I checked all my tickets during the week, and I always check Win for Life last because there are so many numbers. When I realized I won, I said ‘Oh crap!’”

Ascher will now receive the Win for Life top prize of $1,000 a week for life, or in her case, $52,000 each year. However, she doesn’t plan on making many changes to her life.

“I lost my sweetheart a year ago, and I traveled with him,” she said. “I plan on staying home and working on my yard. It will be the best yard on the street.”

Ascher said she had already scheduled some concrete work for her yard before winning the prize, and it was nice to know that it was paid for.

“I already splurged,” she laughed.

Ascher purchased the winning ticket at the Food Fair Market in Southeast Portland. Food Fair Market will receive a retailer selling bonus of $13,000 for producing the winning ticket.

Ascher claimed her prize after making an appointment with the Oregon Lottery. The Oregon Lottery offices remain closed pending guidance from Gov. Kate Brown.

To protect the health and safety of its employees and the public, the Oregon Lottery has temporarily closed the Salem and Wilsonville Lottery offices. Officials with the Lottery continue to monitor the COVID-19 situation closely. If players have a winning ticket, they can fill out a claim form on the Oregon Lottery website, https://oregonlottery.org/about/claim-prizes , and then mail in the signed ticket and claim form.

The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office, at 503-540-100 to schedule an appointment to claim their prize in Salem.

Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes since the Lottery began selling tickets in 1985

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, Veterans services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-05/4939/134580/Charlene_Ascher_press_release.jpg , 2020-05/4939/134580/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2020-05/4939/134580/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg

Umpqua Bank's Central Oregon Small Business Impact: $34 Million, 4,000+ Jobs, 360 Businesses
Umpqua Bank - 05/21/20 10:21 AM

Nealry 4,060 workers in Central Oregon will be able to return to their jobs or keep working, thanks to the more than $34 million worth of federal Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) financial relief applications submitted by Umpqua Bank on behalf of about 360 local small business owners.

The PPP loans that went to business owners in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson Counties are part of the more than $750 million Umpqua Bank processed for its customers in Oregon.

“Small businesses are the lifeblood of our economy. Helping them navigate and survive the pandemic has been one of Umpqua’s highest priorities the past several weeks,” said Umpqua President & CEO Cort O’Haver. “We will continue to do all we can to help our customers and communities get through this challenging time.”

A large percentage of the Central Oregon loan recipients and impacted workers are in Bend. Business owners there received more than 300 loans totaling almost $26 million, which will keep about 3,360 people working.

Umpqua was one of the first banks in the country ready to accept small business applications when the Small Business Administration launched the Paycheck Protection Program on April 3. The bank has successfully processed nearly 14,000 loans worth an estimated $2 billion that helped local businesses save 240,000 jobs in communities.

For context, Umpqua might fund roughly $140 million in SBA funding on average in an entire year.

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Historic cemeteries commission to meet June 5
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/21/20 10:00 AM

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will meet by conference call at 1 p.m. on June 5. Its agenda includes Oregon Historic Cemeteries grant approval and program discussion in response to COVID. The meeting is open to the public and the agenda includes an opportunity for public comment.

 

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. For more information about commission activities, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail at i.gill@oregon.gov">kuri.gill@oregon.gov. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

 

For call-in details and the agenda or more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org.


Limited camping returns to state parks June 9
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/21/20 10:00 AM

News release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Department // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release date: May 21, 2020

Media contact: Chris Havel, 503-986-0722

Limited camping returns to state parks June 9

Salem, Ore – The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) will offer limited camping at many state park campgrounds starting June 9. State park camping closed statewide March 23 in an effort to contain the spread of coronavirus and limit travel, especially to smaller communities and rural areas.

A list of which campgrounds will open June 9 is still being finalized. That list will be published on oregonstateparks.org by the end of May. Not all parks and all services will be available. Most of the campgrounds opening accept reservations, but some first-come, first-served state park campgrounds may open as staff and funding are available.

Those campgrounds that do open will honor existing tent and RV reservations starting June 9, and will accept new reservations from one day to two weeks in advance, instead of the usual nine months in advance. Reservations will still be made through OPRD’s contracted vendor, Reserve America at https://oregonstateparks.reserveamerica.com/. RV and tent campers without reservations will be welcome at open campgrounds as space and staffing permit.

Reservations for most yurts and cabins, and group camping and group day-use, are still subject to cancellation. Visitors holding those reservations will be contacted if a cancellation is required.

Two main forces determine when a state park campground can open. Some communities, such as the north coast, are not yet ready for overnight visitors from outside their area.

A more widespread factor relates to funding. The Oregon State Park system is not funded by taxes, but by revenue from park visitors, a small share of the Oregon Lottery, and a portion of state recreational vehicle registrations. The revenue needed to operate state parks has fallen drastically since March, meaning one of the most popular state park systems in the country is being operated by about half the usual staff.

With a skeleton crew and limited means to hire more, there will be far fewer staff available to help visitors and address common problems such as noise and pets. Trash, landscaping, and cleaning services will all be reduced. Interpretive activities and ranger programs will be few and far between, if at all. Restrooms are expected to be available at each open park, but some shower facilities may be closed. Service, and whether a park is open or not, is subject to change depending on health conditions around the park, available staff, protective equipment, and cleaning supplies.

Visitors can help state parks stay open:

  • Choose a park as close to home as possible. Don’t travel if you’re sick.
  • Visit with members of your household.
  • Bring everything you need with you: trash bags, cleaning supplies, hand sanitizer, food, water. Pack out everything you bring in.
  • Be gentle with the trails, restrooms, showers, benches, and picnic tables.
  • Take it easy on yourself by enjoying low-key, familiar activities.
  • Be a good neighbor. Keep your pets on a leash, your site clean, and respect quiet hours from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m. every day.
  • Keep at least six feet away from people from outside your household, and wear a face covering when you can’t. Avoid crowds even if you have a face covering.
  • Cover coughs, and wash your hands regularly.
  • Watch our Prepare + Care Welcome video at https://youtu.be/IN7qsM08l9k.

“Oregon needs what its parks can provide,” says Lisa Sumption, OPRD Director. “This is less service than Oregonians are used to, and we’re doing our best to stretch the budget, but it will take continued cooperation and support from visitors to make this work.”

A more complete statement from Director Sumption is online at oregonstateparks.org.

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Note: stock photos of people camping in an Oregon State Park are available for any coverage of this news. The photos are for illustration only and do not necessarily reflect parks that will offer camping starting June 9, 2020.


Oregon Air National Guard to continue Air Force Salute flyovers in Oregon (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 05/21/20 9:00 AM
2020-05/962/134545/MemorialDay.jpg
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SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Air National Guard is scheduled to continue flying multiple F-15 Eagle flyovers over hospitals and other locations throughout Oregon Friday, May 22 and Monday, May 25 in order to salute Oregonians on the forefront of the COVID-19 pandemic, lift morale during a time of severe health and economic impacts, and remember those brave service members who have paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

The flyovers are a joint effort between Oregon’s 173rd Fighter Wing, based in Klamath Falls, and the 142nd Wing, based in Portland, aimed at supporting and thanking healthcare workers, first responders, and other essential workers who are working to keep Oregonians safe and healthy each day. The tribute also hopes to unify and boost the spirits of Oregonians and to recognize military members who have lost their lives in service to our country.

Anyone living in and around these hospitals and other locations should see and hear the jets. People are encouraged to view the flights from the safety of their own homes and practice physical distancing.

The flyovers listed below are scheduled for the following locations at the approximate times Friday, May 22.  
8:48 a.m.   Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center, Vancouver, Wash.
9:10 a.m.   Pioneer Memorial Hospital, Heppner, Ore.
9:15 a.m.   Good Shepherd Health Care System, Hermiston, Ore.
9:19 a.m.   St. Anthony Hospital, Pendleton, Ore.
9:25 a.m.   Grande Ronde Hospital, La Grande, Ore.
9:31 a.m.   Wallowa Memorial Hospital, Enterprise, Ore.
9:39 a.m.   St. Alphonsus Medical Center, Baker City, Ore.
9:48 a.m.   Blue Mountain Hospital, John Day, Ore.
10:05 a.m. St. Charles Madras Hospital, Madras, Ore.
10:07 a.m. Warm Springs Health and Wellness Center, Warm Springs, Ore.

The flyovers listed below are scheduled for the following locations at the approximate times Monday, May 25 and include previously approved Memorial Day flyover locations.
10:50 a.m.  Sky Lakes Medical Center, Klamath Falls, Ore.
10:58 a.m.  VA White City, Ore.
11:10 a.m.  VA Roseburg Health Care System, Roseburg, OR
11:10 a.m.  Mercy Medical Center, Roseburg, Ore.
11:18 a.m.  Peace Harbor Cottage Grove Community Med. Center, Cottage Grove, Ore.
11:22 a.m.  McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center, Springfield, Ore.
11:22 a.m.  Peace Harbor Medical Center at Riverbend, Springfield, Ore.
11:24 a.m.  Peace Harbor Sacred Heart Medical Center, Eugene, Ore.
11:40 a.m.  Peace Harbor Medical Center, Florence, Ore.
11:44 a.m.  Lower Umpqua Hospital, Reedsport, Ore.
12:00 p.m.  Asante Three Rivers Medical Center, Grants Pass, Ore.
12:00 p.m.  Grants Pass Riverside Park, Grants Pass, Ore.
12:10 p.m.  Brookings Harbor, Brookings, Ore.

The flyovers have been coordinated as a part of OPERATION: AMERICAN RESOLVE to salute those at the forefront of the COVID-19 response and will be done in conjunction with regularly scheduled training. Pilots must perform a minimum number of flight hours to maintain proficiency. These flyovers will incur no additional cost to taxpayers and are done in lieu of regularly scheduled training.

These flyovers will complete the Oregon Air National Guard’s Air Force Salute flyovers in Oregon. To date, the Oregon Air National Guard has flown approximately 1,920 miles covering 53 hospitals and other locations.

All passes are approximately 2,000 feet above ground level at approximately 400 mph airspeed. Flights could be canceled or times changed due to inclement weather or operational contingencies.

Anyone who gets video or photos of the F-15s flying overhead are encouraged to post on social media using the hashtags: #AirForceSalutes, #AFFlyover, #FlyoverFriday

The Oregon Air National Guard has been an integral part of the nation's air defense since 1941. Pilots from the 173rd Fighter Wing and the 142nd Wing train for a variety of mission skill sets in order to maintain combat readiness for the defense of our state and nation. Additionally, the 142nd Wing provides around-the-clock Aerospace Control Alert for the defense of our homeland, while the 173rd FW is home to the sole F-15C pilot training facility for the United States Air Force. Both units also respond to state and national emergencies as directed by the Governor of Oregon.

Oregon Air National Guard Public Affairs Officers:  Captain Heather Bashor, 503-779-9889, heather.j.bashor.mil@mail.mil

173 FW Contact: Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar, 541-885-6677, jennifer.d.shirar.mil@mail.mil
142 WG Contact: Mr. Steve Conklin, 503-440-4434, steve.l.conklin2.mil@mail.mil

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-05/962/134545/MemorialDay.jpg , 2020-05/962/134545/NE_Oregon_update.jpg

Seven Remarkable High School Seniors Receive Scholarships from OnPoint Community Credit Union Scholar Program (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 05/21/20 9:00 AM
Rachel Maness of Barlow High School, one of the $5,000 scholarship winners.
Rachel Maness of Barlow High School, one of the $5,000 scholarship winners.
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PORTLAND, Ore. May 21, 2020—OnPoint Community Credit Union and the Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA) today announced the 2020 scholarship winners of the OnPoint Community Credit Union Scholar Program. This program recognizes both scholar-athletes and activity scholars who are graduating seniors of an OSAA member school. OnPoint received 250 submissions from 120 OSAA member schools this year.

"Reading the stories and accomplishments of these young students is truly inspiring," said Rob Stuart, President and Chief Executive Officer, OnPoint Community Credit Union. "We couldn’t be more impressed by the impact these remarkable seniors have had on their schools and community so early in their lives, and we wish them continued success in their future endeavors."

OnPoint and the OSAA awarded $15,000 in scholarships this year, including two $5,000 scholarships and five $1,000 scholarships. The Scholar Program honors graduating seniors who have achieved a 3.50 or higher unweighted cumulative GPA, and have earned either a varsity letter in an OSAA-sanctioned sport or competed in an OSAA-sanctioned activity. Winners were selected based on academic achievement, community leadership, two letters of recommendation, and three essay questions on how participating in OSAA activities has either taught them a lesson or helped them achieve their goals.

"These seniors have worked incredibly hard throughout their high school career, and we are thrilled to recognize their accomplishments," said Peter Weber, Executive Director, Oregon School Activities Association. "We look forward to witnessing the impact they will continue to have on our community." 

Winners of the 2020 OnPoint Community Credit Union Scholar Program:

$5,000 Scholarships Winners

Hailey Lewetag of North Salem High School made Honor Roll all four years, while taking AP, IB and honors courses. As she excelled academically, she also won 5A state titles in the 800-meter race and as the anchor for the 4x400 relay in 2019, among other running achievements. Lewetag, who was once a foster child herself, has provided support for others in foster care by passing out gifts to local kids around the holidays for the last three years. Last year alone, she delivered 250 gifts to Marion County and 200 to the Yamhill County Department of Human Services. She will attend Portland State University and run for their track and field team.

Rachel Maness of Barlow High School is a mental health advocate who raises funds, participates in community events, and helped create Challenge Day at Barlow to shed light on the importance of mental health. Maness graduates with a 4.0 GPA while taking all honors, AP or dual credit courses, and will enter Gonzaga University with 58 college credits. As a soccer player at Barlow, she says the lessons she learned on the field will help her succeed as she pursues a career in nursing. 

$1,000 Scholarship Winners

Kaitlyn Auth of Jesuit High School is the founder of Foster Sports, an organization aimed at providing foster children with access to sports equipment. To date, Auth has collected over 400 items to support foster youth. Auth made Honor Roll all four years, achieving a 4.21 weighted GPA, and helped lead Jesuit's French National Honors Society. She ran cross country and track and field for Jesuit and was team captain. She will attend Stanford University in the fall.

Devyn Baer of St. Mary's Academy is a LGBTQIA+ leader who chairs advocacy groups, plans awareness events and helps St. Mary's administration draft policies about inclusion. They continue to challenge themselves academically and have found a passion for aerospace engineering. They served as captain of St. Mary's volleyball team, which they say helped them learn a lot about themselves. They plan to attend the University of Oregon. 

Luke Haslam of Philomath High School maintained a 4.0 GPA throughout high school while taking rigorous courses, participating in multiple activities, and actively engaging his tight-knit community. He is an Eagle Scout, AVID tutor, and an active member of student government, 4-H, the school band, choir, tennis and soccer team. Haslam is headed to flight school to become a pilot. 

Masaki Lew of Clackamas High School helps vulnerable people in his community and across the world. As a Boy Scout, he led his troop to help build a library for Rose Haven Domestic Violence Shelter. He advocated for homeless and food insecurity issues on the Happy Valley Youth Council, World Oregon, and as a US Youth Ambassador in Argentina. Lew achieved a 4.0 GPA and served as senior captain for the Clackamas swim team. He will attend Williams College.

James Moore of Blanchet Catholic School is a natural-born leader who served as student body president, an Inspire Salem Youth Leadership Foundation representative, captain of the football, basketball and baseball team, and president of the National Honor Society, among many other roles. Moore achieved a 4.2 weighted GPA while taking AP, honors and dual credit classes. He will attend George Fox University where he will play basketball and study to become a high school teacher like his parents, aunts, uncles and grandparents.

All graduating seniors in the Scholar Program were eligible to apply for a scholarship. The Scholar Program is part of OnPoint's partnership with OSAA as the title sponsor of the Oregon high school state championships. To learn more about the OnPoint Community Credit Union Scholar Program, please visit www.osaa.org/awards/scholar

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving more than 395,000 members and with assets of $6.5 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union's membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 13 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson, Lane, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Washington and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

ABOUT THE OREGON SCHOOL ACTIVITIES ASSOCIATION

The Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA) is a private non-profit, board-governed association comprised of 292 member high schools. A member of the National Federation of State High School Associations, the OSAA annually sponsors 113 team and 426 individual event state championships for students competing in 19 interscholastic activities. For more information, www.osaa.org or follow @OSAASports on social media.

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Attached Media Files: Rachel Maness of Barlow High School, one of the $5,000 scholarship winners. , Hailey Lewetag of North Salem High School, one of the $5,000 scholarships winners.

Memorial Day 2020: ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick Reflects on Importance of Tradition during Uncertain Times (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 05/21/20 8:00 AM
ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick
ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-05/1082/134551/thumb_KellyFitzpatrick.jpg

In these unprecedented times, I have found myself reflecting more and more on the importance of tradition. Our great nation is rooted in many wonderful traditions. They bind us together, they strengthen us. They provide structure to our lives. They give meaning to the sacrifices that have been made to preserve our freedoms and our way of life.

In normal times, many Oregonians would be taking part in their own time-honored traditions on this Memorial Day. Thousands would line the streets or fill the parks in their home communities, coming together for parades, ceremonies and other solemn events to observe this important day.

Instead of standing alone in front of the Oregon Afghan-Iraqi Freedom Memorial, recording a speech for our virtual ceremony, as I recently did, I would have the privilege of seeing hundreds of honored veterans and family members at our Statewide Memorial Day Ceremony gathered at that Memorial, a tradition we have faithfully observed for almost 15 years.

But these are not normal times. We can’t gather together in the normal way. Yet this doesn’t mean that we can’t observe these traditions, it just means that we must find a new way to observe them. In fact, in this time of great uncertainty and loss, it’s more important than ever for us to hold observances in honor of heroes of all types, but especially those who died fighting for the values and institutions of our American way of life. I would include the untold number of veterans who lost their lives in a very different kind of battle – fighting this insidious Coronavirus. It is more than ironic that these incredibly strong individuals survived military conflicts against human enemies only to succumb so tragically to an unseen enemy.

So that is why ODVA’s Memorial Day tradition will continue on Monday with our first-ever Virtual Statewide Memorial Day Ceremony. The virtual ceremony, which will include a number of messages reflecting on the importance of our great nation — and the generations of proud veterans that have safeguarded it.

I invite all Oregonians to join us for this meaningful and one-of-a-kind event, which you can tune into on ODVA’s Facebook page at 10 a.m. Monday, or anytime thereafter.

Our partners at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs are also offering new ways for the public to pay tribute to our honored veterans including a new online initiative called the Veterans Legacy Memorial.

The site, which contains a memorial page for each veteran and service member interred in a national cemetery, has been available since 2019, but this week that the VA is introducing a new way to observe Memorial Day by permitting online visitors to leave a comment of tribute on a veteran’s page.

The tribute allows visitors to voice memories and appreciation for a veteran’s service. You can visit today at www.vlm.cem.va.gov.

Our nation’s greatest traditions have always started small. Long before there were parades and speeches, long before there were memorials and national cemeteries, Memorial Day began with a very simple tradition.

Families, and small communities, still reeling in the wake of the American Civil War, would visit the local graves of fallen service members, decorating them with flowers picked by their own hands.

This tradition eventually became formalized as a national holiday called Decoration Day, and more recently, Memorial Day. But it was always the tradition that really mattered — the simple act of pausing, honoring and remembering those brave individuals who put on a military uniform and died in defense of freedom and democracy.

And that is still the tradition that matters most today. That is the tradition that no virus or other disaster can take from us. It may change how we observe our traditions, but it cannot in itself end those traditions. And it does not, and cannot, change the enormity of the sacrifices that we honor and remember today.

In a time of great uncertainty and loss, we must remember that we have so much to be thankful for. We are thankful for the service of all of our veterans, from the most recent conflicts to World War II — the 75th anniversary of which we recognize this year. Thank you for fighting to keep our great nation safe and free.

We are grateful for our many veterans across the state of Oregon, who continue to serve and sacrifice in these unprecedented times. They are nurses and doctors and other health care workers; they are firefighters, police officers and first responders; they are mail carriers, grocery clerks and other essential workers, continuing to serve on the front lines of the critical response to COVID-19 and in so many other ways that help keep our society healthy, safe and strong.

And, we are forever grateful to those who paid the ultimate price in service to our country, all those who gave the last full measure of devotion. Our nation is stronger, and our future is brighter, because of them. We will never forget their service and sacrifice.

Finally, thank you for taking time out this week, wherever you are, to continue this important tradition of honoring, remembering and celebrating our nation’s heroes. I look forward to the day that we can once again be together in person to honor our veterans. Until then, please stay safe and well.

Kelly Fitzpatrick is the director of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs and Governor Kate Brown’s policy advisor on veterans’ issues. She is a retired Army officer. Her military awards and decorations include multiple awards of the Meritorious Service Medal, the Southwest Asia Service Medal and the Army Parachutist Badge.




Attached Media Files: ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick

Wed. 05/20/20
Motor Vehicle Crash on La Pine State Recreation Road. (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/20/20 8:54 PM
Injury Crash State Rec Road 2
Injury Crash State Rec Road 2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-05/5227/134557/thumb_Crash_State_Rec_2.jpg

Released by: Sergeant Jason Wall

Release Date: 05/20/2020

Incident Date: 05/19/20, 10:35 pm

Location: State Recreation Road east of 5th Street, La Pine, Oregon.

Driver #1: Jeffrey Clifford Lilley, 50, La Pine, Oregon.

Vehicle #1: 2004 Grey Volkswagen Passat

 

 NARRATIVE: 

On May 19th, 2020 at approximately 10:35 pm, Deputies from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office were dispatched to an Injury Motor Vehicle Crash on La Pine State Recreation Road near 5th Street in La Pine.

Upon arrival investigating Deputies at the scene determined a grey Volkswagen Passat, was traveling westbound on La Pine State Recreation Road, when it left the roadway for unknown reasons and struck a power pole support causing the support cable to land in the roadway.

The vehicle sustained significant damage to the front end as a result of the crash. The driver was wearing a seatbelt at the time of the crash and the vehicles airbags were deployed.

The sole occupant and driver of the vehicle sustained non-life threatening injuries as a result of the crash. The driver was ultimately transported to St. Charles Medical Center in Bend for treatment. The driver is listed as being in stable condition.  

The driver was issued criminal citations for Driving Under the Influence of an Intoxicant, and Reckless Driving.

The cause of this crash is being investigated as driver impairment, in conjunction with a possible medical event.

La Pine State recreation Road was closed to vehicular traffic for approximately one hour due to the support cable being in the roadway. 

La Pine Fire/Medics, Oregon State Police, and Deschutes County Public Works responded to the scene to assist with the investigation.

The investigation is ongoing.

 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the Adult Jail, provides Patrol, Criminal Investigations, Civil Process and Search and Rescue Operations. Special units include SWAT, Street Crimes, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

 

## End of Release ##




Attached Media Files: Injury Crash State Rec Road 2 , Injury Crash State Rec Road

UPDATE - Fatal Crash on Hwy 99E - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 05/20/20 6:51 PM

Operators are being identified:

Deceased operator of the Kia - Jeana Anderson (29) of Salem  

Operator of Chevrolet – Joshua Harris (38) of Harrisburg

On Tuesday, May 19, 2020 at approximately 4:15 P.M.,  Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel  responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 99E milepost 26 near Harrisburg, OR.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Kia Rio was traveling southbound when it crossed into the northbound lanes and into the path of a northbound Chevrolet Silverado.

The operator of the Kia sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

The operator of the Chevrolet was transported to Riverbend hospital.

The northbound lane of Hwy 99E was closed for about an hour and a half.

OSP was assisted by Linn County Sheriff's Office, Harrisburg Fire and ODOT.

 


Traffic Stop Leads to Seizure of Heroin. (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/20/20 6:45 PM
2020-05/5227/134555/scene_search.jpg
2020-05/5227/134555/scene_search.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-05/5227/134555/thumb_scene_search.jpg

Released by: Detective Sergeant Doug Sullivan

Release Date: May 20, 2020

 Location: Hwy 20 West MP 1 

Arrested: Chamberlain, Derek, 33 years of age, Bend OR 

Charges: Possession of Heroin, Delivery of Heroin, Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of a Schedule IV Controlled Substance, and Felon in Possession of a Restricted Weapon.          

 

NARRATIVE: 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Street Crimes Unit has been investigating Derek Chamberlain for the sales of controlled substances in Deschutes County. On May 20, 2020, Street Crimes detectives learned Chamberlain was returning to Deschutes County with possible controlled substances in his possession.  

Detectives observed Chamberlain driving a Toyota 4 Runner east bound through the City of Sisters. Chamberlain was stopped near mile post 1 on Hwy 20 West. A Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office K9 Ares, and his partner Deputy Mike Mangin responded and alerted to the presence of controlled substances in Chamberlain’s vehicle. A subsequent search of the vehicle revealed Chamberlain was in possession of approximately four ounces of suspected heroin, a user amount of methamphetamine, Xanax, brass knuckles, and over 3,000.00 in U.S. Currency.  

Chamberlain was lodged in the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Jail on the above mentioned charges.  

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office street crimes unit focuses enforcement on street level drug cases and quality of life issues connected to property crimes throughout Deschutes County.  

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Street Crimes, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

 

## End of Release ##

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-05/5227/134555/scene_search.jpg , 2020-05/5227/134555/Chamberlain_seizure.jpg

Deputies Quickly Locate and Arrest Burglary Suspect in Sisters (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/20/20 6:40 PM
Google Earth Image
Google Earth Image
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-05/5227/134554/thumb_Capture.JPG

Released by: Sgt. William Bailey – Public Information Officer

Release Date: May 20, 2020

 

Location:    200 block of S. Elm Street, Sisters

Arrested:     Bauer, Thomas J.  Age: 34                        Transient

Charges:     Burglary I, Theft II

NARRATIVE:

On May 20, 2020, at approximately 3:00pm, deputies with the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office were dispatched to a residence in the 200 block of S. Elm Street in Sisters regarding a burglary.  The initial information given to deputies was the resident had arrived home to find a transient male sleeping in his bed.  The suspect male left the residence once confronted by the resident and was last seen near the Village Green Park.  The resident also reported the male had taken property from the residence.

Deputies arrived in the area within two minutes and began searching for the suspect.  Thomas J. Bauer was located a short time later in one of the public restrooms inside the Village Green Park.  Bauer was positively identified as being the suspect in the burglary and deputies recovered the stolen property in his pockets.

Bauer was arrested and transported to the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Jail on charges of Burglary I and Theft II.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Street Crimes, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

## End of Release ##




Attached Media Files: Google Earth Image

La Pine Man Arrested After Graffiti Spree and Spitting on Deputies (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/20/20 5:49 PM
Mug Shot
Mug Shot
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-05/5227/134552/thumb_InmateImg052020ZZZ179039_Frontal_202144732.jpg

Released By: Sgt. Kent Vander Kamp

Release Date: May 20, 2020

Location: Highway 97 at 1st St, La Pine, OR

Arrested: Andrew S Garrett, Age 28, La Pine, OR

Charges:    Criminal Mischief I (5 counts)

                     Possessional of Methamphetamine – Felony

                     Criminal Trespass I

                     Criminal Trespass II

                     Disorderly Conduct II (3 counts)

                    Menacing

                    Harassment

                    Aggravated Harassment

                     Interfere with a Peace Officer

Narrative:

La Pine, OR – On May 19th, 2020 at approximately 5:10PM, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Deputies were dispatched to a man painting graffiti on a business in the downtown La Pine area. The business manager provided a detailed description of the man has he fled the area after being confronted.

DCSO Deputies arrived in the area within seconds of the call and found the man inside a nearby gas station bathroom trying to wash the paint from his hands and change clothing.

The suspect was identified as Andrew S Garrett, age 28, of La Pine, Oregon.

Garrett was also in possession of a backpack that likely contained paint and other evidence. DCSO Deputies later obtained a Search Warrant from a County Circuit Court Judge and seized additional evidence from the backpack, including, methamphetamine and paint.

DCSO Deputies investigated and determined that Garrett was the same person painting random words and scribbles on many businesses throughout the downtown La Pine area during the previous week. Based on evidence collected at the gas station and the other scenes, Garrett was also identified as the suspect in those previous six cases.

Due to COVID-19 protocols, Garrett was cited in lieu of custody for several counts of Criminal Mischief I and Criminal Trespass. He was issued citations and told to leave the business property. He refused and challenged DCSO Deputies to a fight before spitting and throwing gas station trash cans at them and Sheriff’s Office vehicles. A DCSO Deputy received minor injuries during the struggle with Garrett, who was uninjured.

DCSO Deputies arrested Garrett for the new crimes and lodged in the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Jail with the above listed charges.

DCSO believes there may be additional victims that either have not found or reported recent graffiti damage. Deputies ask that any additional victims in the downtown La Pine area to report any graffiti to our office by calling 541-693-6911 or use the DCSO on-line reporting system at sheriff.deschutes.org.

Our office will also be working with the victim businesses to remove the illicit graffiti with our inmate work crew graffiti removal program.

Reference DCSO Case No 20-79640

# END OF RELEASE #




Attached Media Files: Mug Shot

Prineville Reservoir State Park campground, dispersed camping remain closed
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/20/20 5:15 PM

PRINEVILLE, Ore. – The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) reminds visitors that Prineville Reservoir State Park remains closed to all camping. This includes all boat-in camping on the reservoir and dispersed camping at Roberts Bay and along the unimproved North Road.

Camping in the Prineville Reservoir Wildlife Area, managed by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), opened May 20.

OPRD-managed campgrounds and dispersed camping areas are closed to camping at least through and including June 8. Updates and details about this decision are posted on OPRD’s COVID-19 FAQ at oregonstateparks.org. Many parks are open for daytime use—visitors can check the park status map for a complete list.


Marine Board Seeks Written Public Comment on Petitions Relating to Paddlers
Oregon Marine Board - 05/20/20 3:03 PM

The Oregon State Marine Board is soliciting written public comments on two citizen petitions received by the agency.

The first citizen petition was received on May 4, 2020, regarding paddlecraft and personal floatation device administrative rules.  The petitioner is asking the Marine Board to amend its current rules regarding personal floatation devices (PFDs) to require that all persons on paddlecraft wear PFDs during the periods before June 1 and after September 15. An electronic copy of the petition can be found here: https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/info/Documents/Rulemaking/PaddlePFDPetition.pdf

The second citizen petition was received on May 14, 2020, regarding administrative rules related to the Waterway Access Permit.  Petitioners are requesting that the Marine Board amend its current rules so that the Waterway Access Permit expires one year from the date of purchase (as opposed to the end of the calendar year) for annual permits, and two years from the date of purchase for two-year permits. An electronic copy of the petition can be found here: https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/info/Documents/Rulemaking/CitizenPetition_WaterwayAccessPermit.pdf.

Written comment will be accepted until June 28, 2020, by 11:59 pm. Comment can be submitted by email to .rulemaking@oregon.gov">mailto:osmb.rulemaking@oregon.gov, fax at (503) 378-4597 or by U.S. Mail to Jennifer Cooper, Administrative Rules Coordinator, Oregon State Marine Board, 435 Commercial Street NE, Salem, OR 97301. Testimony will not be accepted by telephone and comments must be received prior to the closure time/date to be considered.  

Rulemaking and Public Notices are available on the agency’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Pages/Rulemaking-and-Public-Notices.aspx.

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Committee for Emergency Fire Cost to meet June 2 via Zoom
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/20/20 2:13 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Emergency Fire Cost Committee will meet virtually Tuesday, June 2 from 10 a.m. to noon. To join the call or provide public comment at this virtual meeting use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda.

The meeting is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Chrystal Bader at 503-945-7220.

Among agenda items are:

  • Financial status of the Oregon Forest Land Protection Fund
  • Weather update
  • Update on status of large fire cost collection efforts
  • Forest Land classification status report
  • Eligibility Directive review/revisions
  • Agency / Fire Division report – Strategic Investments
  • EFCC Administrator report

This meeting is open to the public. Public comments will be accepted near the end of the meeting, once the EFCC Administrator report has been given.

The Emergency Fire Cost Committee oversees the Oregon Forest Land Protection Fund (OFLPF), established by the Oregon Legislature as an insurance fund with the purpose of equalizing emergency fire suppression costs among the various Oregon Department of Forestry protection districts. The emergency funding system is designed to operate as an insurance policy whereby all districts contribute (pay premiums) into the fund so that money will be available to any individual district to pay fire suppression costs on emergency fires. More information can be found here: https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Board/Pages/EFCC.aspx


Statement From Oregon Hospitals on State Revenue Forecast
Oregon Assn. of Hosp. and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 05/20/20 12:51 PM

Becky Hultberg, President and CEO of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, released the following statement in response to the state’s revenue forecast. 
 
“Today’s state revenue forecast presents grim news, as the public health crisis gripping the state has rippled through our economy and decimated state revenue. As the Governor and Legislature grapple with this budget reality, now is not the time to reduce investments in health care. Rather – because hospitals drive positive health outcomes and promote economic activity – the investments we make now in our hospitals, health care workforce, and coverage for vulnerable Oregonians will help lead our economic recovery while we continue to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. Our community hospitals have been there for Oregon, and state leaders now have a chance to support local hospitals by prioritizing health care funding. We are committed to being strong partners with policymakers as we work together to solve our shared challenges.” 
 




Attached Media Files: 2020-05/1635/134539/OAHHS_Statement_on_State_Revenue_Forecast.pdf

Eugene Man Sentenced to Four Years in Federal Prison for Illegal Firearm Possession
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/20/20 12:49 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—A convicted felon from Eugene was sentenced to federal prison today for illegally possessing a 20-gauge shotgun, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

Delano Franklin Oscar, Jr., 58, was sentenced to 48 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, in the early morning hours of December 14, 2018, Lane County Sheriff deputies identified a parked car as reported stolen. They discovered Oscar asleep in the vehicle’s front passenger seat with a 20-gauge shotgun shell near his feet. The deputies searched the vehicle and found a loaded 20-gauge pump-action shotgun, a small baggy of methamphetamine, and a glass pipe. The shotgun had been reported stolen in October 2017. Oscar was arrested without incident.

On January 16, 2019, a federal grand jury in Eugene returned a two-count indictment charging Oscar with felon in possession of ammunition and a firearm. On January 29, 2020, he pleaded guilty to both charges.

As part of his plea agreement, Oscar agreed to voluntarily abandon his interest in the shotgun seized by investigators.

This case was investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) and the Lane County Sheriff’s Office, and was prosecuted by Pamela Paaso, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

The case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Students Persevere With Impressive Showing at "Virtual" Oregon History Day; Over 50 Students Advance to National Contest (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 05/20/20 12:48 PM
Anja Jolin at 2019 National History Day contest.
Anja Jolin at 2019 National History Day contest.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-05/2861/134538/thumb_NHD_2019_047_Anja_Jolin_Sr_Paper_and_Outstanding_Sr_Entry_from_OR.jpg

Portland, OR – Even amidst a pandemic, 141 students from across the state came together virtually to participate in Oregon History Day, the statewide qualifying competition for the annual National History Day® contest. Fifty volunteer judges evaluated over 70 projects online, inspired by the annual theme of “Breaking Barriers in History,” and 56 students qualified to advance to the National History Day® contest, which will take place online from June 14–20.

Working from home, middle and high school students developed their research projects, in the forms of papers, documentaries, websites, performances, and exhibits, persevering through hurdles that the new virtual format presented (for example, students submitting performances had to pivot their projects and provide a written script, including descriptions of settings, characters, and costumes, rather than perform in person). While the virtual nature of the contest created challenges, it also presented incredible opportunities; by removing the barrier of cross-country travel, 100% of Oregon’s qualifying students have registered to present their projects along with over 4,000 students from across the country. 

Last year marked the first year that Oregon students placed first at the national contest. Portland high school students Kyler Wang and Alan Zhou impressed judges with their powerful documentary on the history and destruction of Celilo Falls, Echo on Falling Water. They hope to defend their title this year, with a new documentary on civil rights activist Minoru Yasui, titled Breaking the Curfew: The Story of Minoru Yasui, which placed first in the senior group documentary category at Oregon History Day.

St. Mary’s Academy student Anja Jolin is also looking forward to presenting her paper, “Chipping Away at the Bullet Proof Glass Ceiling: Portland Women Breaking Barriers in Policing,” at the national contest next month. When asked why she continues to participate in Oregon History Day each year, she shared: "Oregon History Day has given me the chance to delve into topics that interest me and explore the intricate details and mysteries of historical events. I enjoy connecting local history to broader issues with national significance, such as immigration and systemic gender barriers. Oregon History Day has given me a chance to take my learning outside the classroom and learn about events and people in history and the impact that they have made to society as a whole."

Other notable entries that will represent Oregon include:

  • Fighting for Change: The Integration of Women in the Armed Forces, a documentary by Evelyn Chen, Flora Huang, and Rachel Wang from Stoller Middle School
  • Operation Firefly: The Barrier-Breaking Battalion, a documentary by Karalin Reynolds and Rylee Mann from Helix School
  • Jane Austen's Impact on Feminism, an exhibit by Cassady Kirchner, Eva Norman, and Mina Gregg from South Salem High School
  • Larry Itliong: Overcoming Barriers of Filipino Farm Workers in the Delano Grape Strike, a website designed by Darsh Mandera, Felix Petteni, Namrata Venkatesan, Sophia Pi, and Wenjun Hou from Jesuit High School

While students missed the comradery of an in-person contest, participants like Jolin are thankful that the contest was able to continue, providing some sense of normalcy during an otherwise chaotic school year: "In this difficult time, when so many things are being canceled, I am very grateful to Oregon History Day for creating a virtual competition and giving students a chance to showcase their projects. While it was disappointing that we did not get to gather together as a community and celebrate everyone’s hard work, having a virtual competition has given me something to work toward and look forward to during this time."

A full list of 2020 Oregon History Day participants can be found at ohs.org/oregonhistoryday.

---

About Oregon History Day:

Oregon History Day, part of National History Day®, is a renowned, evidence-based middle and high school program where students across the state develop historical research projects based on an annual theme. Facilitated by the Oregon Historical Society, Oregon History Day encourages students to nurture their curiosities by researching topics from any time period or place, or by analyzing a historical event that connects to the annual theme. Students present their work in one of five categories — paper, website, exhibit, documentary, or performance —that can be developed independently or in groups of up to five students for all categories (except paper).

Open-ended topic selections and student-directed inquiries give participants ownership over their projects and give educators the flexibility to adapt the program to fit their curriculum. Educators can narrow the scope of topic selections to align with themes they are covering in the classroom, such as focusing on the diversity of the many people who have shaped Oregon’s history. As students move through the process, they learn to collect, organize, and analyze information through a historical lens by evaluating primary and secondary sources.

Over half a million students across the nation participate, and for the first time ever, the National History Day® office is allowing students to begin work on their 2021 projects now! The 2021 theme is Communication in History: The Key to Understanding. For more information on National History Day®, visit www.nhd.org.
 



About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.




Attached Media Files: Anja Jolin at 2019 National History Day contest. , NHD 2019 Jr Outstanding Entry for OR and Sr Outstanding Entry for OR , Oregon students attend 2019 National History Day contest. , Oregon students attend 2019 National History Day contest. , Oregon students attend 2019 National History Day contest. , Kyler Wang and Alan Zhou accept their first place prize at the 2019 National History Day contest.

Convoy Planned to Raise Public Awareness of Klamath Water Crisis
Oregon Farm Bureau - 05/20/20 12:39 PM

Shut Down and Fed Up: Taking a Stand for Ag

Convoy Planned to Raise Public Awareness of Klamath Water Crisis

For Immediate Release
Contact: Bob Gasser (541) 891-9113

(Merrill, Oregon) - Klamath Irrigation Project family farmers and ranchers, along with community leaders in the rural areas of the Klamath Basin are issuing a “Call to Unity” for supporters to join them in a water rally later this month in southern Oregon. The planned two-hour tractor convoy will start at 10:00 a.m. on May 29th in Merrill, Oregon. The route will wind its way through Klamath Project farmlands, proceed down Klamath Falls’ Main Street and end up in a local farmer’s field near Midland, Oregon. 

“We’re asking farm supporters far and wide to join our movement,” said Bob Gasser, a local businessman who is helping to organize the event. “It’s not going to be limited to just tractors and farm equipment. You can fire up your gravel truck, your logging truck, your pickup truck or even your car, and join us, too.”

The convoy is intended to draw attention to a multi-decade federal water management scheme that has increasingly moved water away from farming and ranching and towards the perceived needs of fish protected under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA).

“We want to draw public attention to the need to fix the flows and save our farms,” said Mr. Gasser. Hopefully, this will also draw the attention of President Trump and his administration. We know how committed he is in securing America’s food supply and we need him to know that his goal is in danger here in the Basin.”

For 20 years, federal agencies have been managing the Klamath River by placing priority on salmon and sucker fish populations protected by the ESA. For 20 years, the agencies have used stored water that was intended for local irrigators to set artificially high lake levels (to stabilize sucker populations in Upper Klamath Lake) and send an increasingly large amount of water downstream (intended to flush disease out of the river).  

“Unfortunately, the fish populations have not increased, while the local farming population continues to shrink,” said Mr. Gasser.  “We can fix this problem, but we need our political leaders to hear our voice.”

The 2020 irrigation season is the most challenging water year facing Klamath Project irrigation districts and contractors in at least two decades, if not ever.  Unfortunately, this scenario is becoming the norm.  Federal agency decisions threaten to bankrupt family farms, and send economic and psychological shockwaves throughout every local sector that has been dependent on agriculture for over a century.

As a first step, community leaders have organized the route for the tractor convoy on May 29th. The rally will end in a local farmer's field, where vehicles will park, and each driver will plant a symbolic white cross in the ground.

“This symbolic act will honor those who farmed before us, including the unfortunate families who no longer operate because of the increasingly uncertain water supply,” said Scott Seus, whose family farms near Tulelake, California. “For the remainder of this summer, those crosses will provide a grim reminder to passersby of the fate that awaits our rural communities if things don't change.”

Event organizers are asking that residents show their support for local farmers by joining this unifying rally at the lineup to start the convoy in Merrill. Alternatively, supporters can join the convoy as it passes through downtown Klamath Falls later in the morning. Convoy participants will plant crosses provided by event organizers in support of this effort.                                                                
                                                                                      # # #

 


Oregon families will start receiving $134 million in additional food benefits in June
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/20/20 10:34 AM

(Salem, Ore.) – On May 5, 2020, the Department of Human Services (DHS) and the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) announced that more than 351,000 students receiving free meals from Oregon schools will get additional food benefits for groceries during the school closure.

Households will receive food benefits equivalent to the cost of one lunch and one breakfast for each eligible student – $5.70 per normal school day for the months of March, April, May and June.

Beginning in June, these additional benefits will be automatically deposited for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) households to their existing Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) accounts on their regular issuance date. Benefits are sent out from the 1st to the 9th of the month, based on the last digit of your SSN.

Students who get free school meals but do not receive SNAP benefits will automatically receive an Oregon Trail Card in the mail in the months of June and July. Parents do not need to apply if their children are part of a school where all students receive free meals.

Families whose children attend participating schools and have experienced significant income loss may have become eligible for free school meals, and there is still time to apply. Apply online at https://www.ode.state.or.us/apps/FRLApp/Default or contact your local school. To find out if your school participates in this program, visit https://www.oregon.gov/ode/students-and-family/childnutrition/Pages/COVID-19.aspx.

Benefits will be retroactive to March 16, 2020 for students who received free and reduced-price meals when schools closed. For newly eligible free or reduced-price students or SNAP households, benefits will start at the beginning of the month they become eligible. Eligible students will receive the following:

  • $69 for March
  • $126 in April
  • $120 in May
  • $69 in June

More information about the program is available at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits or https://www.oregon.gov/ode/students-and-family/childnutrition/Documents/FAQ - Parent - Website.pdf.

DHS will continue to work with federal partners to provide greater assistance to Oregonians in need. For more information about food assistance, visit needfood.oregon.gov or call 2-1-1.




Attached Media Files: 2020-05/973/134529/Oregon_families_will_start_receiving_$134_million_in_additional_food_benefits_in_June_052020.pdf

Oregon's high desert Memorial Day connection
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 05/20/20 9:30 AM

Portland, Ore. – The news feature article below, titled “Every day is Memorial Day on Burma Rim,” commemorates how an ancient volcanic rim on public land in Oregon’s high desert tells a story of duty and sacrifice.

In 1973, a U.S. Navy jet on a training mission crashed on Burma Rim in Oregon’s remote high desert, near Christmas Valley within the BLM Lakeview District. Naval aviators Lt. Alan G. Koehler and Lt. Cmdr. Philip D. Duhamel both perished in the accident. Today, a memorial plaque honors the fallen aviators at the BLM-designated historic site.

Full story below.

Multimedia resources:

For more information on visiting the site, please contact the LM_OR_LV_Mailbox@blm.gov,%20or%20541-947-2177.">BLM Lakeview District Office at BLM_OR_LV_Mailbox@blm.gov or 541-947-2177.

 

-BLM–

 

Every day is Memorial Day on Burma Rim

Story by Greg Shine, BLM Oregon/Washington

The vast sagebrush sea of Oregon’s High Desert enchants and inspires, teasing revelation from deep within its silver-green majesty.

This allure belies the events that, thousands of years ago, forged the craggy volcanic rocks at its core. Outside forces occasionally revisit the land’s cataclysmic birth, etching their mark and bursting open a portal to even broader human connection.

Burma Rim is one of these places.

There, on public land, miles from the nearest paved road leading to Christmas Valley, the remains of a Navy jet rest atop the edge of an ancient lakeshore escarpment, framed by sweeping vistas of sagebrush and rocky buttes.

A plaque near the aircraft’s tail section honors the two naval aviators who died there.

The flutter of fading American flags, attached in memoriam to hulking sections of the decades-old aircraft wreckage, brings the only sound and motion to the static landscape.

Where fire and havoc once raged, solitude now provokes reflection. Reflection on service and sacrifice. And on life, love, and loss.

On Burma Rim, every day is Memorial Day.

 

Like Burma Rim itself, the U.S. Navy’s Attack Squadron 128—known as VA-128—was also forged in fire.

Established in 1967 during the Vietnam War as a Fleet Replacement Squadron, it trained naval aviators, flight officers, and crewmen for assignment to fleet squadrons, where they would conduct wartime missions over Southeast Asia from aircraft carriers. In 1973, the squadron was based at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island in Washington State.

As the squadron’s commanding officer would later report, 1973 was a year of transition for the unit. January marked the end of U.S. Navy combat operations in Vietnam, broadened thereafter to all of Southeast Asia. “This marked the first time since VA-128 was commissioned that flight crews were not being trained for going directly into a combat environment,” the squadron commander noted.

Still, that year the Golden Aviators of VA-128 logged 6,918 training hours and honed skills through 371 daytime and 233 nighttime landings while training aboard the USS Ticonderoga and the USS Lexington aircraft carriers. “Peace time has had no appreciable effect on aircrew training,” the squadron commander reported at year’s end.

The squadron’s workhorses were its Grumman A-6A Intruder jets, measuring in at over 54 feet long with a wingspan nearly identical at 53 feet. Two Pratt and Whitney J52-P-6A turbojets powered these low-flying, long-range attack aircraft, enabling subsonic speeds of up to 646 miles per hour.

Hidden within its bulbous nose and fuselage, the A-6A’s state-of-the-art avionics were its prime feature. They included an inertial navigation system, air data computer, ballistics computer, radar altimeter, Doppler navigation system, and an advanced all-weather electronic system with antennae for both search and track radar optimized for stealthy nighttime and inclement weather missions.

One of the squadron’s new pilots training to fly the A-6A in 1973 was Lt. Alan G. Koehler.

After graduating from Luther College in 1968, the Illinois native and baseball standout completed Aviation Officer Candidate School and, in March of 1969, earned an ensign’s commission in the U.S. Navy. Shortly thereafter, he joined VA-128 as a bombardier-navigator and transferred to VA-52 the following year, amassing an impressive collection of honors that included nine Strike-Flight Air Medals and three Navy Commendation Medals.

In March of 1973, Koehler earned his naval aviator wings and returned to VA-128 in April for fleet replacement pilot training to fly the A-6A Intruder. By September, he had accumulated over 390 flying hours of pilot training—including 93 flying hours at the stick of the A6-A—at just 27 years old.

One of Koehler’s instructors was Lt. Cmdr. Philip D. Duhamel.

Duhamel was well known at Whidbey Island, having been stationed there in 1964, 1968, and since June of 1972. The New York City native graduated from the University of Rhode Island in 1963. The following year, he was commissioned a U.S. Navy ensign and, shortly thereafter, a naval flight officer.

While assigned to Carrier Division 7, he served as flag lieutenant. Over six combat cruises, Duhamel earned honors such as the Strike Flight Air Medal and the Navy Commendation Medal with Combat “V.”

Duhamel returned to NAS Whidbey Island in June 1972, attached to VA-128, and by 1973 served as a staff instructor for new pilots from the bombardier/navigator (B/N) position inside the A-6A. By September, the 33-year-old had logged over 456 flying hours as a B/N in the A-6A, including 23.2 daytime and 3.8 nighttime flight hours in the past 90 days.

On September 19, Duhamel was paired as Koehler’s instructor for a nighttime training flight over central Oregon.

 

To some, the overcast sky and midday rain on Wednesday, September 19, 1973, may have seemed more like autumn than one of the last days of summer at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island.

That day, like many before it, crewmen serviced jets for training flights, while pilots-in-training and instructors planned and prepared for their next missions. 

One of these, labeled Event 28314, was to be Koehler’s next training flight, with Duhamel serving as instructor in the B/N position. It was a routine, nighttime, low-level syllabus training exercise, one of many flown by the Golden Aviators of VA-128.

The assigned training flight route, Tail Hook OB-16, was aptly named; it hung like a giant fishing hook bent over the High Desert’s ancient Pleistocene lakebeds.

Trainees flew it in a clockwise direction, dropping into its lower altitude path near the imaginary hook’s tip in western Harney County, just northeast of Wagontire Mountain. Jetting southwest toward the northern tip of Silver Lake in Lake County, pilots would then cut sharply north to a point southeast of Hampton Butte – forming the curve of the hook—before continuing northeast and ending at the Boardman Bombing Range (today’s Naval Weapons System Training Facility Boardman) just outside of Boardman, Oregon.

Military flights regularly followed this route, and an official Military Training Route—dubbed IR342—still covers parts of the pathway today.

Like others, the Tail Hook route contained specific checkpoints, and the flight timing between each was an important aspect of pilot training. The data meticulously recorded for each training flight included leg speeds and leg times—the speeds and times between checkpoints. If the team flew too slowly, the mission would fall behind schedule; if it flew too quickly, the mission could end disastrously.  

With their pre-flight briefing starting ahead of schedule, Koehler requested that their take off time be advanced a half hour, and he and Duhamel departed from Whidbey Island at 7:54 p.m. in their A-6A.

Sporting tail number 155721, the jet was one of the squadron’s more reliable ones, according to its maintenance officer. It passed its daily and preflight inspections—and Navy records indicate that it had flown two recent missions “with no reported discrepancies.” However, later investigation revealed that a “breakdown in internal maintenance department communications and procedures” allowed it to be launched that evening when it would have otherwise been held for maintenance.

The departure went off without a hitch. The crew’s communication with air traffic control in Seattle was routine and contained no mention of any issues or malfunctions.

From an altitude of 29,000 feet, Koehler and Duhamel sped over the Cascade Mountains of central Washington toward Oregon. Shortly after 8:37 p.m., at a point southeast of Indian Rock in Washington’s Klickitat County, air traffic control in Seattle cleared them to proceed on their approach to the Tail Hook route. Crossing the Columbia River into Oregon, they reported leaving their altitude of 24,000 feet and acknowledged when Seattle reported the expected loss of radar contact.

This would be the last radio transmission received from the flight.

 

Passing over Wolf Mountain, just south of today’s Black Canyon Wilderness Area, Koehler and Duhamel entered the approach to the training route and gradually descended. Speeding south, they passed a checkpoint ten miles west of Snow Mountain. They continued in that direction to another checkpoint about ten miles northeast of Wagontire Mountain, in today’s Northern Great Basin Experimental Range, where they descended and entered the Tail Hook route.

There, they flew toward the next checkpoint at Summer Lake low, straight, and level. And fast.

By then, they had fallen behind schedule. To make up time, they pushed past the designated and planned ground speed of 360 knots—about 414 miles per hour. It was a dark, moonless night over the High Desert, and the men relied entirely on their radar equipment for navigation.

Koehler and Duhamel then descended lower, below the minimum altitude.

As their pre-flight briefing would have noted, the squadron’s SOP (standard operating procedure) for the Tail Hook route made particular note of hazardous terrain on the approach to the Summer Lake turning point, where high points like Burma Rim, Sheep Rock, and Diablo Peak rise from the rolling, gently sloping landscape.

This terrain was known to cause the A-6A’s computerized APQ-92 radar system to create shadows of varying lengths. “Very close attention must be given to shadows generated by terrain and the B/N must insure that those shadows are decreasing in length,” a Navy report reads. “Shadow lengths that are decreasing are the only true indication of sufficient clearance altitude.”   

Clearance was a major factor for fast, ground-hugging flights like Event 28314.

The authorized minimum altitude for the Tail Hook route was 500 feet AGL—above ground level—but the squadron SOP had amended it to 750 feet with all terrain clearance systems working properly and up to 1,000 feet AGL if any were not operational.

Speeding toward the Summer Lake checkpoint and guided by their instruments, Burma Rim’s gentle eastside upslope rose in the distance to the jet’s steady elevation.

At about 8:50 p.m., a U.S. Air Force B-52 flying nearby reported viewing a flash of light, followed by a fireball, explosion, and intense fire on Burma Rim.

The A-6A had crashed; both Koehler and Duhamel were dead.

 

The standard description of the resulting accident—a CFIT or controlled flight into terrain—gives some understanding of what happened. However, it was Burma Rim’s scarred lava rocks and sagebrush that helped investigators piece together the flight’s last moments.

The landscape revealed that the A-6A first impacted the upsloping terrain, carving a 50-foot path. Sagebrush was broken down for about 15 to 20 feet in front of this site, indicating level flight prior to impact.

According to Navy investigators, there was “a strong possibility” that Koehler had become aware of the dangerous position just before this first impact and applied full back stick in an unsuccessful attempt to lift the jet above the terrain. At the first impact, Duhamel is believed to have ejected from the jet.

The jet, heavily damaged, then skipped back into the air for about 650 feet. In those final seconds, Koehler struggled valiantly to save the aircraft before ejecting from the cockpit.

The A-6A then impacted the rim again and exploded in a white-hot fireball, charring lava rock, burning sagebrush, and spreading debris for more than half a mile.

While ejection cleared Koehler and Duhamel from the explosion and fire, it wasn’t able to save their lives. The plane’s speed and low altitude put them outside the safe escape envelope of their Martin-Baker GRU-5 ejection seats, and, tragically, both perished amongst the sagebrush.

The Navy quickly initiated an investigation on site. The following day, U.S. Navy personnel transported the bodies of the fallen aviators back to the air station. A memorial service was held for both officers at the NAS Whidbey Chapel on September 25, 1973.

While the Navy removed portions of the A-6A debris for investigation, much of it remains on Burma Rim today.

 

As stewards of Burma Rim, the BLM continues to do its part to honor the aviators and preserve the site.

On June 14, 2007, nearly 34 years after the accident, a crowd gathered at the Lake County Courthouse War Memorial in Lakeview, Oregon. There, BLM staff, building on the exhaustive research efforts of District Archaeologist Bill Cannon, declared the A-6A accident site a historic federal site, along with an additional military aircraft accident site nearby. They also announced the upcoming placement of interpretive plaques at both locations to ensure, as Cannon described it, “the preservation of these cultural artifacts for future generations.”

From the Flag Day dais, Cannon illustrated how the site provokes reflection even decades after the tragic accident.

To Cannon and many others, the site is a portal to understanding what service and sacrifice really mean. He spoke that day of how the aviators “sacrificed their lives helping to defend the freedoms we enjoy in this great country.”

“As has been said, freedom is not free,” he continued. “It is fitting that we honor the memory of these men with these plaques. By doing so, we also honor all of the men and women who have made the ultimate sacrifice, and those who continue to do so today.”

And Cannon knows—better than most.

Not only has he studied and researched the site for decades, he has first-hand knowledge of Navy aviation. While serving in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War, he watched A-6 jets launching from the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea, bound for missions over Southeast Asia.

However, Cannon is the first to say that the story is not the airplane itself. It’s the site on Burma Rim, where the quiet sagebrush landscape fosters an opportunity for active, vibrant reflection.

“This is, to me, sacred ground,” he said.

And many visitors to Burma Rim today would agree.

-- by Greg Shine, BLM Oregon/Washington

 

-BLM–

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals. 

 


Oregon Cannabis Commission Governance and Frame Working Subcommittee conference call June 3
Oregon Health Authority - 05/20/20 8:45 AM

May 20, 2020

What: A public meeting by conference call for the Governance and Frame Working Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD

When: June 3, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Conference call line: 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregonians get early glimpse of 2021 health insurance rates
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 05/20/20 8:24 AM

Salem – Oregon consumers can get a first look at requested rates for 2021 individual and small group health insurance plans, the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services announced today.

In the individual market, six companies submitted rate change requests ranging from an average 3.5 percent decrease to an average 11.1 percent increase, for a weighted average of 2.2 percent. In the small group market, nine companies submitted rate change requests ranging from an average 1.1 percent decrease to an average 7.9 percent increase, for a weighted average of 3.9 percent. See the attached chart for the full list of rate change requests.

Moderate rate increase requests, recent health insurance company financial statements, and three insurers looking to offer on-exchange plans statewide, up from one in 2020, reveal that the Oregon health insurance market is stable and able to provide multiple health insurance options for all Oregonians.

“It’s early in the process, but it is encouraging to see more carriers expand their coverage area statewide and another year of modest rate change requests,” said Insurance Commissioner and acting DCBS Director Andrew Stolfi. “The initial data reveals that Oregon’s reinsurance program continues to provide premium relief and stabilization for the market.”

The Oregon Reinsurance Program continues to help stabilize the market and lower rates while threats at the federal level provide continued uncertainty and remain a significant factor for rising premiums. Reinsurance lowered rates by 6 percent for the third straight year. Meanwhile, federal policy changes and multiple court cases continue to instill doubt and add to rate increases.  

Health insurance companies submitted rate requests to the department’s Division of Financial Regulation on May 18. The requested rates are for plans that comply with the Affordable Care Act for small businesses and individuals who buy their own coverage rather than getting it through an employer. The division must review and approve rates before they are charged to policyholders. Over the next two months, the division will analyze the requested rates to ensure they adequately cover Oregonians’ health care costs.

This review will include accounting for recent COVID-19 claims experience and ongoing risks created by the pandemic. It is too early to understand the effect COVID-19 relief efforts will have on health insurance rates, but the state’s rate review process provides the opportunity to gather and analyze more data before final rate decisions are made.

Oregonians will soon be able to compare their health plans and submit comments about the initial rates at oregonhealthrates.com. Public hearing dates will also be posted to the site.

“We look forward to a thorough public review of these filings as we work to establish next year’s health insurance rates,” said Stolfi. “We encourage all Oregonians to review these initial rate requests and provide feedback on their health insurance plans.”

Oregonians are encouraged to comment on rate change requests during the public comment period, which opens later this month and runs through June 30. The public can submit comments at oregonhealthrates.com and during the public rate hearings.

Preliminary decisions are expected to be announced in early July, and final decisions will be made in early August.

                                                                                        ###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and www.dfr.oregon.gov.


Tue. 05/19/20
Oregon Parks Forever releases Tips For Recreating Safely
Oregon Parks Forever - 05/19/20 7:07 PM

As our parks across the state begin to reopen, here is a link to 30 second and  60 second PSAs in HD format that share some tips for recreating safely.

 

https://we.tl/t-pyAJyHRHSW


Resource Education & Agricultural Leadership Program Class 3 Graduates, Class 4 Recruitment Underway (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 05/19/20 3:50 PM
REAL Oregon Class 3 got to meet Governor Brown at the State Capitol before the pandemic.
REAL Oregon Class 3 got to meet Governor Brown at the State Capitol before the pandemic.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-05/5507/134500/thumb_realoregonclass3.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 19, 2020
Contacts: Greg Addington, Director, (541) 892-1409; Lauren Lucht (Class 1), Board Member, (503) 710-7001; Jake Gibbs, Board Chairman, (541) 530-5600

Resource Education & Agricultural Leadership Program (REAL Oregon) Class 3 Graduates, Class 4 Recruitment Underway

Fourth REAL Oregon Class will start in November, Contingencies in Place for Social Distancing

Salem, OR – The Resource Education and Agricultural Leadership Program (REAL Oregon) recently announced the successful completion of Class 3. The final in person session of this cohort, scheduled for March 17 -19 in Boardman, was canceled due to the pandemic and the Governor’s stay-in-place order. However, despite this and other logistical challenges, Class 3 wrapped up their formal training with a virtual fifth and final session.

REAL Oregon Board Chair Jake Gibbs commented on the challenges. “The preference would have been meeting in person in Boardman, that wasn’t possible. We did, however, deliver great online presentations and had excellent class participation in our virtual session.”

REAL Oregon Executive Director Greg Addington noted that while the formality of an actual Class graduation will have to wait, the program is happy to welcome the following outstanding individuals into our growing alumni network.

Randi Bural -Northwest Farm Credit Services

Tricia Chastain - Northwest Farm Credit Services

Allison Cloo - Oregon Aglink

Dave Coates - PCC Airfoils

Jackson Coleman – Coleman Agriculture (pending)

Matthew Cook - Cook Family Farms

Betsy Earls – Weyerhaeuser (pending)

Jeremy Felty - Oregon Small Woodlands Assoc.

Jason Flowers - Flowers Farms

Brennan Garrelts - Lone Rock Resources

Kelley Hamby - Central Oregon Irrigation District

Rob Hamlin - Riddell Farms/Ash Creek Oregon

Matt Hegerberg – Heron Timber (pending)

Gordon Jones - OSU Southern OR Extension

Katie Kissler - Hancock Forest Management

Catherine Kiyokawa - Kiyokawa Family Orchards

Brent Klumph - OSU Research Forests

Heidi Leib - Boise Cascade Wood Products

Nathan Miller - Oregon Department of Agriculture

Jolene Moxon - Modoc Co. (CA) Ag Department

Sean Naumes - Naumes, Inc.

Lisa Patrick - SAGE Center/Port of Morrow

Nicole Ruggiero - Tualatin SWCD

Whitney Henneman - Silver Butte Timber Co.

Susan Schmidlin - Schmidlin Angus Farms

Andrea Sonnen - Oregon Dept. of Agriculture

Nicole Sullivan - TU/Owyhee Watershed Council

Diann Washburn - Oregonians for Food and Shelter

Alexa Weathers - Kerr Supply Company

 If a participant misses one or more sessions for any reason, their graduation status is pending, and they are given up to two years to complete the session they missed with another class.  

REAL Oregon is a collaboration of industry and other groups throughout the state that have recognized the importance of developing and grooming natural resource leaders now and in the future. In addition to one of a kind networking opportunities and learning more about the state, the program will bring current and future leaders together from agriculture, fishing, and forestry sectors in a series of five statewide sessions starting this fall. The annual leadership development program will expose this cross-section of representatives to the diversity of Oregon’s geography, economy, and cultures through training in board governance, communication skills, conflict resolution, government interaction, public policy work, critical thinking, media relations, professional presentations, public speaking, relationship building and other areas.

Planning for Class 4 – November 2020

To adjust for the COVID-19 situation, some changes have been made to the schedule and policies related to Class 4. REAL Oregon board member and curriculum chair, Lauren Lucht said these changes will not take away from the programming or this distinctive opportunity. “The COVID situation has created challenges to be sure, but it has also created opportunities and could, in fact, make for an even more unique and rewarding experience for participants”. Lucht noted that the application deadline is July 24, 2020 and interested candidates should visit the REAL Oregon website (www.realoregon.net) for more information.

Addington said the program’s directors will continually monitor the situation as we move into the fall and will follow appropriate guidelines from the CDC, OHA, and the State of Oregon. “In anticipation of welcoming our 4th cohort this fall we have adopted the following program changes”.

·         25 participants will be the target for Class 4

·         Participants will be responsible for their own lodging costs

·         Participant tuition for Class 4 will be $2,000 (tuition assistance may be available)

·         Participants may be responsible for their own travel to tour sites

·         Additional changes may be implemented to align with State and local county COVID related health and safety recommendations or requirements.

Gibbs added that the value of the program may never be greater. “We are living in a unique and uncertain time. The need for enhancing and growing our leadership skills and networks are more evident today than ever. The REAL Oregon board of directors and our committed sponsors continue to recognize the value and importance of this program. While class 4 may look a little different than previous classes, our mission remains intact”.

For more information visit www.realoregon.net or contact Greg Addington at 541-892-1409 or eg@addingtonconsulting.net" target="_blank">greg@addingtonconsulting.net

###

 




Attached Media Files: REAL Oregon Class 3 got to meet Governor Brown at the State Capitol before the pandemic. , 2020-05/5507/134500/REAL_Oregon_Circle_Logo_Generic_2.jpg

Prevent You Campfire From Turning Into A Wildfire
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/19/20 3:49 PM

Sitting around a campfire is one of the special times we all enjoy, but campfires are also a major cause of wildfires. May is Wildfire Awareness Month, and the Pacific Northwest Coordination Group urges campers to follow these basic outdoor safety tips:

  • Know before you go

Before going camping, always contact the forest district, agency or landowner first to learn if there are any current campfire restrictions where you plan to recreate.

  • Have water and fire tools on site

Bring a shovel and a bucket of water to extinguish any escaped embers. When you are ready to leave, drown all embers with water, stir the coals, and drown again. Repeat until the fire is DEAD out. If it is too hot to touch, it is too hot to leave.

  • Select the right spot

Where campfires are allowed, choose a site with an existing ring. Fire pits in established campgrounds are the best spots. If you choose to build a campfire, avoid building it near your tent, structures, vehicles, shrubs or trees, and be aware of low-hanging branches overhead. Clear the site down to bare soil, at least five feet on all sides, and circle it with rocks. Store unused firewood a good distance from the fire.

  • Keep your campfire small

A campfire is less likely to escape control if it is kept small. A large fire may cast hot embers long distances. Add firewood in small amounts as existing material is consumed.

  • Attend your campfire at all times

A campfire left unattended for even a few minutes can grow into a costly, damaging wildfire. Stay with your campfire from start to finish until it is dead out, as required by law. That ensures any escaped sparks or embers can be extinguished quickly.

  • Consider alternatives to a campfire this summer

Portable camp stoves are a safer option to campfires at any time of year. Areas that prohibit campfires outside maintained campgrounds with established fire pits often allow camp stoves.

  • Never use gasoline or other accelerants

Don’t use flammable or combustible liquids, such as gasoline, propane or lighter fluid, to start or increase your campfire.

  • Burn ONLY local wood

Hauling your firewood to a remote campground can potentially transport invasive species. Instead, buy it where you’ll burn it or gather wood on site where permitted. State regulations prohibit the open burning of any other material that creates dense, toxic smoke or noxious odors. Burning paper and cardboard can also easily fly up to start new fires.

Escaped campfires can be costly. State and federal law require the proper clearing, building, attending and extinguishing of open fires at any time of year. While citations and fines may apply, the biggest potential cost for an escaped campfire is firefighting costs. These can range from a few hundred to tens of thousands of dollars or more.

During Wildfire Awareness Month visit Smokey Bear’s website at https://www.smokeybear.com/en and www.keeporegongreen.org for other wildfire prevention tips.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

The Pacific Northwest Wildfire Coordinating Group is established to provide a coordinated interagency approach to wildfire management in Oregon and Washington. PNWCG provides leadership in interface and wildland fire management for local, tribal, state and federal agencies and their constituents to enhance firefighter safety and protection of life, property, and natural resources.

PNWCG is comprised of USDA-Forest Service; USDI-Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Indian Affairs, National Park Service, Fish and Wildlife Service; Oregon Department of Forestry; Washington Department of Natural Resources; Washington Association of Fire Chiefs; The Oregon Fire Chiefs Association; The Oregon State Fire Marshal and the Washington State Fire Marshal.             

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FBI Offers Virtual Recruitment Opportunities (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 05/19/20 2:23 PM
Special Agent Trainee at Quantico
Special Agent Trainee at Quantico
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-05/3585/134502/thumb_New_Agent_Trainee_at_Quantico.jpg

Looking for new ways to serve your community and your country? Ready to check out new challenges? As the FBI's future depends on the workforce we are hiring right now, we have not lowered our standards, nor have we adjusted our commitment to diversity during this time. What we are doing is looking for new ways to connect with applicants.

Given current requirements for physical distancing, the FBI is offering potential candidates the opportunity to explore career options virtually. Each Thursday, the FBI’s Portland Field Office is conducting “Ask an Agent” sessions online for Oregonians. Job seekers who take part have a chance to get more information about the application process and to ask questions about life as an agent. 

Virtual “Ask an Agent” Sessions

Do You Qualify?

FBI special agent applicants must meet certain criteria, including:

  • Be a U.S. citizen
  • Be between the ages of 23 - 36
  • Have earned a minimum of a bachelor’s degree from a U.S.-accredited school
  • Have at least two years professional work experience
  • Be able to obtain a security clerance
  • Be able to pass a physical fitness test. You can check your readiness by downloading the FBI’s FitTest smartphone app (available through the App Store or Google Play)

Competitive Applicants

What does it take for an applicant to be competitive? While the FBI encourages individuals of all backgrounds to apply to the FBI, we are actively seeking individuals with the following skills:

  • Science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)
  • Linguists
  • Law/legal
  • Military/law enforcement
  • Cybersecurity/technology
  • Healthcare services/medical
  • Psychology/counseling
  • Accounting/finance

Beyond that, FBI recruiters are looking for people with “core competencies,” including: collaboration; communication; flexibility and adaptability; initiative; interpersonal ability; leadership; organizing and planning; and problem solving and judgment

For more information on basic requirements and process, go to www.FBIJobs.gov. Also, follow us at @FBIPortland on Twitter for updates about our recruiting events.

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Attached Media Files: Special Agent Trainee at Quantico , Special Agent Training Class , Special Agent fit test , Special Agents at work

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: COVID-19 Leads to Oregon's Record Job Losses in April
Oregon Employment Department - 05/19/20 10:00 AM

Public health measures implemented in March to combat the rapid spread of COVID-19 are having an unprecedented economic impact on Oregon and the United States. April provides the first full month of data measuring the initial impact on businesses and the unemployed.

“Today’s release shows that 266,600 jobs were lost in the first two months of this pandemic and the unemployment rate has reached 14.2 percent. While these numbers make for shocking historical records, they cannot totally capture the economic trauma so many Oregonians are experiencing at this time,” said Anna Johnson, Senior Economic Analyst with the Oregon Employment Department.

Oregon’s unemployment rate rose from a near-record-low 3.5 percent, as revised, in March to a record-high 14.2 percent in April, as COVID-19 business closures shut down a large portion of the economy. This is the highest rate and the largest over-the-month increase in the history of the series (comparable data are available back to 1976). The number of unemployed Oregonians rose by 227,530, to reach 300,420 in April. These sharp increases reflect the onset of the coronavirus pandemic and efforts to contain it. The U.S. unemployment rate rose from 4.4 percent in March to 14.7 percent in April.

Oregon’s payroll employers shed 253,400 jobs in April, following a loss of 13,200, as revised, in March. In April, one out of every eight jobs in Oregon was idled or lost. Leisure and hospitality took the brunt of the impact of pandemic-induced closures. The industry lost more than half of its jobs (-54.6%) in one month. Job losses were widespread throughout the economy though. No sector in Oregon gained jobs in April. Other industries that were hardest hit in April were health care and social assistance (-26,800 jobs), retail trade (-22,500), professional and business services (-19,200), government (-13,100), other services (-12,900), construction (-12,000), and manufacturing (-11,600).

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the April county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Wednesday, May 27th, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for May on Tuesday, June 16th.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The PDF version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

 

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-05/930/134492/employment_in_Oregon_--_April_2020_--_press_release.pdf

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Social Media Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 05/19/20 9:00 AM
TT - Social Media Games - GRAPHIC - May 19, 2020
TT - Social Media Games - GRAPHIC - May 19, 2020
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-05/3585/134013/thumb_TT_-_Social_Media_Games_-_GRAPHIC_-_May_19_2020.png

Note to media: A video soundbite on this topic is available. If you wish to download a copy of that, please email media.portland@fbi.gov.

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against social media scams. 

With our current crisis, millions of Americans are spending a lot more time at home and online these days. Physical distancing means we rely on virtual socialization more than ever, and bad actors know it. Today, a warning to social media users to pay close attention to the information they share online.  

Social media platforms have played host to various games and quizzes for a long time, but in this new environment we want to remind you to think before you post.  

Many students in the class of 2020 won’t get the traditional graduation ceremony this year. Because of that, there’s a trend on social media to offer your support of these students by posting information about your high school experience, including photos and details such as your school name, graduation year, and mascot. All three are answers to common password retrieval security questions 

Other online games ask you to post a picture of your first car; answer questions about your best friend; provide the name of your first pet; identify your first concert, favorite restaurant, or favorite teacher. Some even ask you to tag your mother, which may reveal her maiden name.  

Before taking part in what appears to be a harmless social media share, we encourage you to carefully consider the possible negative impact of putting too much personal information online.  

There are ways to lock down your sensitive accounts so a fraudster would need more than just the answers to a few personal questions. One great option is to use multi-factor authentication.  

There are three categories of credentials: something you know; something you have; and something you are. 

  • “Something you know” is your password or a set PIN you use to access an account. The PIN does not typically change. 

  • “Something you have” is a security token or app that provides a randomly generated number that rotates frequently. The token provider confirms that you—and only you—know that number. “Something you have” can include verification texts, emails, or calls that you must respond to before accessing an account. 

  • “Something you are” includes fingerprints, facial recognition, or voice recognition. This category of credentialing sounds a bit unnerving—but think about how you unlocked your smart phone this morning. You probably have used your fingerprints or face several times today just to check your email. 

Multi-factor authentication is required by some providers, but it is optional for others. If given the choice, take advantage of multi-factor authentication whenever possible, but especially when accessing your most sensitive personal data—to include your primary email account, and your financial and health records. 

As always, if you have been victimized by a cyber fraud, you can report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at? www.IC3.gov. 

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Attached Media Files: TT - Social Media - AUDIO - May 19, 2020 , TT - Social Media Games - GRAPHIC - May 19, 2020

Mayra Pelayo Named Malheur Regional Teacher of the Year (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 05/19/20 8:30 AM
2020-05/4939/134469/Regional_Teacher_of_the_Year_Logo.png
2020-05/4939/134469/Regional_Teacher_of_the_Year_Logo.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-05/4939/134469/thumb_Regional_Teacher_of_the_Year_Logo.png

Candidate for 2021 Oregon Teacher of the Year

The pivotal role of teachers has become especially evident in these last several months as schools have transitioned to distance learning in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic. Teachers have stepped up in countless, innovative ways to ensure students are safe, healthy and engaged to reach their full potential, making this a fitting opportunity to recognize the excellence of Regional Teachers of Year throughout the state!

Aiken Elementary School’s second grade teacher, Mayra Pelayo was named Malheur’s 2021 Regional Teacher of the Year! Pelayo wins a $500 cash prize and is in the running for Oregon’s 2020 Teacher of the Year – to be announced this fall.

“By understanding the situations that many of our students encounter each day, our minds and hearts will be open to making sure we are emotionally present for them,” Pelayo is quoted from her application.

Regional Teachers of the Year are nominated by students, colleagues, administrators, friends or family members to apply for the award, and are selected by a diverse panel of regional representatives. Later this fall one of the Regional Teachers of the Year will be named the 2021 Oregon Teacher of the Year.

Thanks to the Oregon Department of Education’s partnership with the Oregon Lottery, the 2021 Oregon Teacher of the Year receives a $5,000 cash prize (with a matching $5,000 going to their school!) and serves as a spokesperson and representative for all Oregon teachers. Three finalists will receive $2,000 with a matching $2,000 going to their school. Please visit OregonTeacheroftheYear.org for more information.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-05/4939/134469/2021_Mayra_Pelayo_Teacher_Bio.docx , 2020-05/4939/134469/2021_Regional_Teachers_of_the_Year_Statewise_Press_Release.docx , 2020-05/4939/134469/Regional_Teacher_of_the_Year_Logo.png , 2020-05/4939/134469/Oregon_Lottery_Logo.png , 2020-05/4939/134469/Oregon_Dept_of_Education_Logo.png , 2020-05/4939/134469/Mayra_Pelayo_color.png , 2020-05/4939/134469/Mayra_Pelayo.png

Melanie Friend Named Jefferson County Regional Teacher of the Year (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 05/19/20 8:30 AM
2020-05/4939/134467/Regional_Teacher_of_the_Year_Logo.png
2020-05/4939/134467/Regional_Teacher_of_the_Year_Logo.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-05/4939/134467/thumb_Regional_Teacher_of_the_Year_Logo.png

Candidate for 2021 Oregon Teacher of the Year

The pivotal role of teachers has become especially evident in these last several months as schools have transitioned to distance learning in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic. Teachers have stepped up in countless, innovative ways to ensure students are safe, healthy and engaged to reach their full potential, making this a fitting opportunity to recognize the excellence of Regional Teachers of Year throughout the state!

Ashwood Elementary School teacher, Melanie Friend was named Jefferson County’s 2021 Regional Teacher of the Year! Friend wins a $500 cash prize and is in the running for Oregon’s 2020 Teacher of the Year – to be announced this fall.

“Students will share their victories with you, and in that, it becomes your victory as well. So, know your students, foster those trusting relationships, and watch them succeed,” Friend is quoted in her application.

Regional Teachers of the Year are nominated by students, colleagues, administrators, friends or family members to apply for the award, and are selected by a diverse panel of regional representatives. Later this fall one of the Regional Teachers of the Year will be named the 2021 Oregon Teacher of the Year.

Thanks to the Oregon Department of Education’s partnership with the Oregon Lottery, the 2021 Oregon Teacher of the Year receives a $5,000 cash prize (with a matching $5,000 going to their school!) and serves as a spokesperson and representative for all Oregon teachers. Three finalists will receive $2,000 with a matching $2,000 going to their school. Please visit OregonTeacheroftheYear.org for more information.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-05/4939/134467/2021_Melanie_Friend_Teacher_Bio.docx , 2020-05/4939/134467/2021_Regional_Teachers_of_the_Year_Statewise_Press_Release.docx , 2020-05/4939/134467/Regional_Teacher_of_the_Year_Logo.png , 2020-05/4939/134467/Oregon_Lottery_Logo.png , 2020-05/4939/134467/Oregon_Dept_of_Education_Logo.png , 2020-05/4939/134467/Melanie_Friend_color.png , 2020-05/4939/134467/Melanie_Friend.png

Melissa Stolasz Named High Desert Regional Teacher of the Year (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 05/19/20 8:30 AM
2020-05/4939/134466/Regional_Teacher_of_the_Year_Logo.png
2020-05/4939/134466/Regional_Teacher_of_the_Year_Logo.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-05/4939/134466/thumb_Regional_Teacher_of_the_Year_Logo.png

 Candidate for 2021 Oregon Teacher of the Year

The pivotal role of teachers has become especially evident in these last several months as schools have transitioned to distance learning in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic. Teachers have stepped up in countless, innovative ways to ensure students are safe, healthy and engaged to reach their full potential, making this a fitting opportunity to recognize the excellence of Regional Teachers of Year throughout the state!

Ridgeview High School’s science and mathematics teacher, Melissa Stolasz was named High Desert’s 2021 Regional Teacher of the Year! Stolasz wins a $500 cash prize and is in the running for Oregon’s 2020 Teacher of the Year – to be announced this fall.

“Students, the thing that will make your eyes light up, the future that you will have, is probably something you don’t even know about yet, so keep every door open that you can,” Stolasz is quoted from her application.

Regional Teachers of the Year are nominated by students, colleagues, administrators, friends or family members to apply for the award, and are selected by a diverse panel of regional representatives. Later this fall one of the Regional Teachers of the Year will be named the 2021 Oregon Teacher of the Year.

Thanks to the Oregon Department of Education’s partnership with the Oregon Lottery, the 2021 Oregon Teacher of the Year receives a $5,000 cash prize (with a matching $5,000 going to their school!) and serves as a spokesperson and representative for all Oregon teachers. Three finalists will receive $2,000 with a matching $2,000 going to their school. Please visit OregonTeacheroftheYear.org for more information.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-05/4939/134466/2021_Melissa_Stolasz_Teacher_Bio.docx , 2020-05/4939/134466/2021_Regional_Teachers_of_the_Year_Statewise_Press_Release.docx , 2020-05/4939/134466/Regional_Teacher_of_the_Year_Logo.png , 2020-05/4939/134466/Oregon_Lottery_Logo.png , 2020-05/4939/134466/Oregon_Dept_of_Education_Logo.png , 2020-05/4939/134466/Melissa_Stolasz_color.png , 2020-05/4939/134466/Melissa_Stolasz.png

Stacey Martin Named Lake Regional Teacher of the Year (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 05/19/20 8:30 AM
2020-05/4939/134461/Stacey_Martin_color.png
2020-05/4939/134461/Stacey_Martin_color.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-05/4939/134461/thumb_Stacey_Martin_color.png

Candidate for 2021 Oregon Teacher of the Year

The pivotal role of teachers has become especially evident in these last several months as schools have transitioned to distance learning in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic. Teachers have stepped up in countless, innovative ways to ensure students are safe, healthy and engaged to reach their full potential, making this a fitting opportunity to recognize the excellence of Regional Teachers of Year throughout the state!

Adel School District’s teacher, Stacey Martin was named Lake’s 2021 Regional Teacher of the Year! Martin wins a $500 cash prize and is in the running for Oregon’s 2020 Teacher of the Year – to be announced this fall.

“I am so happy to represent the greatest profession there is. Helping young people find their gifts and see in themselves what we see in them is what all teachers strive to do,” Martin is quoted from her application.

Regional Teachers of the Year are nominated by students, colleagues, administrators, friends or family members to apply for the award, and are selected by a diverse panel of regional representatives. Later this fall one of the Regional Teachers of the Year will be named the 2021 Oregon Teacher of the Year.

Thanks to the Oregon Department of Education’s partnership with the Oregon Lottery, the 2021 Oregon Teacher of the Year receives a $5,000 cash prize (with a matching $5,000 going to their school!) and serves as a spokesperson and representative for all Oregon teachers. Three finalists will receive $2,000 with a matching $2,000 going to their school. Please visit OregonTeacheroftheYear.org for more information.




Attached Media Files: 2020-05/4939/134461/2021_Stacey_Martin_Teacher_Bio.docx , 2020-05/4939/134461/2021_Regional_Teachers_of_the_Year_Statewise_Press_Release.docx , 2020-05/4939/134461/Stacey_Martin_color.png , 2020-05/4939/134461/Stacey_Martin.png , 2020-05/4939/134461/Regional_Teacher_of_the_Year_Logo.png , 2020-05/4939/134461/Oregon_Lottery_Logo.png , 2020-05/4939/134461/Oregon_Dept_of_Education_Logo.png

Fatal Crash on Interstate 5 - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 05/19/20 6:26 AM

On Tuesday, May 19, 2020 at approximately 1:31 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Interstate 5 northbound near milepost 219.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Honda Odyssey, operated by Forrest Davisson (77) of St. Helens, was northbound when it left the roadway, struck a guardrail, and overturned.

Davisson sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted at the scene by Linn County Sheriff's Office, ODOT and Halsey Fire Department.