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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Tue. May. 31 - 4:36 pm
Tue. 05/31/16
Spring clean-up should prevent, not start wildfires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/31/16 3:36 PM
Many Oregonians have good intentions when they set out to eliminate the fire hazards around the home. But the way they go about it may actually start a wildfire. Using the right tool in the right place at the right time is crucial during clean-up. Get any of these wrong, and the outcome could be disastrous.

In late July 2015, the Stouts Creek Fire in SW Oregon ignited, eventually growing to more than 26,000 acres and costing millions of dollars to put out. The blaze was caused by a resident mowing dry grass, with the probable intention to reduce the fire hazard.

Spring is the time to clean up excess vegetation, not during the summer when fuels are dry and susceptible to a spark from a steel blade striking a rock or emitted by a hot exhaust system. Improper equipment use ranks as the No. 2 cause of wildfires on state-protected lands in Oregon.

FOLLOW CURRENT FIRE RESTRICTIONS -- Check with the local Oregon Department of Forestry district or forest protective association to learn if there are any current restrictions or regulations on the use of internal combustion engines (lawn mowers, chainsaws, weed trimmers). Some areas may restrict their use depending on weather and vegetation conditions.

MOW BEFORE 10 A.M. -- The best time of day to use gas-powered equipment is early morning, when the humidity is higher and temperatures are lower. Never mow when it's windy or excessively dry.

USE THE RIGHT TOOL FOR THE JOB -- Lawn mowers are designed to mow lawns, not weeds or tall, dry grass. Use a weed trimmer with plastic line, vs. metal blades that can strike rocks, create sparks and start a wildfire. Remove rocks in the area before you begin operating any power equipment to avoid sparks.

ALL PORTABLE GAS-POWERED EQUIPMENT MUST HAVE AN APPROVED SPARK ARRESTER -- In wildland areas, an escaped carbon particle from a muffler may be all it takes to start a fire. This includes cars, tractors, harvesters, chainsaws, weed trimmers and mowers. Keep the exhaust system in proper working order, spark arresters clear of carbon build-up, and the engine free of oil and dust. Allow equipment to cool before refilling with gasoline. Use the recommended grade of fuel and don't top it off.

Wildfire awareness, preparedness and prevention are crucial this year. Learn more at: www.keeporegongreen.org, and be a part of the solution.
Marijuana edibles become legal June 2: OHA provides information to keep children safe
Oregon Health Authority - 05/31/16 3:20 PM
May 31, 2016

On June 2 edible marijuana products containing up to 15 mg of THC will be available for retail sale in registered medical marijuana dispensaries across the state to adults 21 or over.

Although smoking marijuana has the added risk of harmful smoke exposure, eating or drinking marijuana still exposes you to THC, the chemical that makes you high. While you quickly feel the effects of smoked or vaped marijuana, edibles can take up to four hours to take full effect.

Marijuana can make children very sick.

-- You can help keep the children in your life safe and healthy by storing all marijuana products in a locked area that children cannot see or reach.
-- If your child eats or drinks marijuana products, call the Poison Center Hotline as soon as possible at 1-800-222-1222.
-- If symptoms seem bad, call 911 or go to the emergency room right away. Symptoms can include your child having trouble walking or sitting up, starting to be sleepy or having a hard time breathing.

THC can affect people differently. Members of the public are advised to ingest less than the 15 mg per unit limit and wait at least 90 minutes and up to four hours before eating or drinking more.

Temporary Oregon Administrative Rules go into effect June 2. The rules, under OAR 333-008-1500, are available online at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/mmj/Documents/Rulemaking/333-008-Marijuana-Early-Start-Temporary-Rule-Text.pdf.

They allow a registered medical marijuana dispensary to sell to members of the public age 21 or older one unit of a single-serving, low-dose cannabinoid edible per day. A unit of low-dose cannabinoid edible can contain more than one edible as long as the total tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in the unit does not exceed 15 mg. THC is the chemical in marijuana that makes you high. Also on June 2, all edible retail marijuana products in Oregon must have a clear THC serving size indicated on them.

To learn more about the work of the Oregon Public Health Division related to marijuana, please visit healthoregon.org/marijuana.

# # #
Nominations now open for 2016 Oregon Governor's Volunteer Awards; Wells Fargo commits $15,000 to support this year's event
Wells Fargo - 05/31/16 2:15 PM
PORTLAND, Ore. -- Nominations are now being accepted for the 2016 Governor's Volunteer Awards conducted by Oregon Volunteers Commission for Voluntary Action and Service and sponsored by Wells Fargo.

"Following the rich tradition begun by Governor Vic Atiyeh in 1981, the annual awards honor individuals, programs and organizations for creating positive change through volunteerism across the state," said Kathleen Joy, Executive Director of Oregon Volunteers.

In addition to event sponsorship, Wells Fargo will provide funding for cash grants that each individual and nonprofit group or program winner will designate to a nonprofit of their choosing.

There is no cost to enter a nomination. The nomination deadline is 11:59 p.m. Thursday, June 23. The nomination form and more information are posted online at www.oregonvolunteers.org/events/gva.

"This is a great program that recognizes the important work done by volunteers and we are proud to support it," said Wells Fargo Oregon Regional President Tracy Curtis of Portland. "Volunteerism is part of our company culture and one of the many ways we help our communities succeed. Last year our team members volunteered nearly 52,000 hours in Oregon and S.W. Washington."

The awards are given at both the regional and statewide levels in the following categories:
Adult Volunteer or Duo (age 19-64)
Elder Volunteer or Duo (age 65 or better)
Youth Volunteer or Duo (age 18 and younger)
Lifetime Achievement (individual or duo - at least 10 years of service in Oregon)
Youth Volunteer Program
Small Business Volunteer Program (15 or fewer employees)
Large Business Volunteer Program (16+ employees)
Community Based Volunteer Program
Statewide Business Volunteer Program (any size -- active in 3 or more regions)
Statewide Community Based Volunteer Program (active in 3 or more regions)
AmeriCorps Alumni (recognizes the volunteer efforts of members AFTER they have completed a year of AmeriCorps service)

Awards Luncheon Set For Oct. 11

A committee will review the nominations. The winners will be honored at a luncheon Oct. 11 at the Salem Conference Center.

Oregon Volunteers is the State Commission for Voluntary Action and Service. Its mission is to strengthen communities by inspiring Oregonians to actively engage, volunteer and serve. Oregon Volunteers promotes and supports AmeriCorps, Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), volunteerism and civic engagement to strengthen Oregon communities. For more information about Oregon Volunteers, visit http://www.oregonvolunteers.org

Wells Fargo has been serving Oregonians since 1852. The community-based financial services company provides banking, insurance, investments, mortgage, and consumer and commercial finance through 8,800 locations; 13,000 ATMs; the Internet (wellsfargo.com); and other distribution channels across North America and internationally. Wells Fargo earned the statewide award for Outstanding Volunteer Program in 2010.
Motorycle Crash Kills Klamath Falls Man - Klamath County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/31/16 7:45 AM
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On May 30, 2016 at about 6:15 PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a motorcycle crash on Running Y Road near Highway 140.

Initial investigation revealed a 2002 Harley Davidson motorcycle was traveling southbound on Running Y Road approaching Highway 140 when it failed to negotiate a sharp curve. The motorcycle traveled across a grassy area before ejecting the operator into a pond.

The operator, James D DEHART, age 47, of Klamath Falls, was pronounced deceased at the scene. Speed is being considered as contributing factor in the crash. More information will be released when it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1002/94854/20160202_155635.jpg
Crash North Of Rogue River Takes Life Of Grants Pass Man - Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/31/16 7:20 AM
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On May 30, 2016 at about 9pm OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a report of a vehicle versus tree on Hwy 99 near milepost 8 (1 mile north of Rogue River).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 1997 Honda coupe was traveling northbound on Highway 99 at a high rate of speed when it failed to negotiate a right sweeping curve. The Honda exited the roadway and struck a large pine tree on the driver's side door. The driver, Donovan G HILBY, age 47, of Grants Pass, was pronounced deceased at the scene by medical personnel. The passenger, Patrick G GREEN, age 35, of Grants Pass, was transported to Rogue Regional Medical Center with serious injuries.

The highway was restricted to one lane for about 3 hours as the investigation was conducted. Oregon Department of Transportation, Rogue River Fire Department, Rogue River Police Department and the Jackson County Sheriff's office assisted. Alcohol and speed are believed to be contributing factors of the crash. More information will be released as it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1002/94852/952016053095212402.jpg
Mon. 05/30/16
[PHOTOS] Oregon National Guard Participates in Memorial Day Events
Oregon Military Department - 05/30/16 5:50 PM
Brig. Gen. Mark A. Crosby, Commander of Joint Domestic Operations, Oregon National Guard, listens as Daniel Swain, Tigard Police Officer and Staff Sergeant in the Air Force Reserve's 304th Rescue Squadron speaks during a Memorial Day ceremony in Tigard, M
Brig. Gen. Mark A. Crosby, Commander of Joint Domestic Operations, Oregon National Guard, listens as Daniel Swain, Tigard Police Officer and Staff Sergeant in the Air Force Reserve's 304th Rescue Squadron speaks during a Memorial Day ceremony in Tigard, M
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/thumb_2016-05/962/94847/160530-Z-IW846-046.JPG
160530-Z-IW846-032
Brig. Gen. Mark A. Crosby, Commander of Joint Domestic Operations, Oregon National Guard, pledges allegiance to the U.S. flag alongside Tigard Police Department's Daniel Swain, a member of the Air Force Reserve's 304th Rescue Squadron based out of Portland, Oregon, during a Memorial Day ceremony in Tigard, May 30. The event featured guest speakers; Brig. Gen. Mark Crosby, Daniel Swain and others, a 21-gun salute and playing of taps by the Oregon Army National Guard Honors Team among other military proceedings to honor fallen servicemembers from all generations. (Photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven Conklin Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

160530-Z-IW846-100
Brig. Gen. Mark A. Crosby, Commander of Joint Domestic Operations, Oregon National Guard, speaks to a crowd during a Memorial Day ceremony in Tigard, May 30. The event featured guest speakers; Brig. Gen. Mark Crosby, Daniel Swain and others, a 21-gun salute and playing of taps by the Oregon Army National Guard Honors Team among other military proceedings to honor fallen servicemembers from all generations. (Photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven Conklin Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

20160530-Z-PL933-067
Members of the Portland Sea Cadets Color Guard march forward through more than 300 visitors to post the National and State flags, beginning a Memorial Day commemoration ceremony at Willamette National Cemetery, Portland, Oregon, May 30. The event featured guest speakers; Congressman Kurt Schrader and Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, The Adjutant General, Oregon, a 21-gun salute and playing of taps by the Oregon Army National Guard Honors Team among other military proceedings to honor fallen servicemembers from all generations. (Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

20160530-Z-PL933-117
Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, the Adjutant General, Oregon, speaks to more than 300 guests during a Memorial Day commemoration ceremony at Willamette National Cemetery, Portland, Oregon, May 30. The event featured guest speakers; Congressman Kurt Schrader and Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, The Adjutant General, Oregon, a 21-gun salute and playing of taps by the Oregon Army National Guard Honors Team among other military proceedings to honor fallen servicemembers from all generations. (Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

20160530-Z-PL933-126
Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, the Adjutant General, Oregon, speaks to more than 300 guests during a Memorial Day commemoration ceremony at Willamette National Cemetery, Portland, Oregon, May 30. The event featured guest speakers; Congressman Kurt Schrader and Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, The Adjutant General, Oregon, a 21-gun salute and playing of taps by the Oregon Army National Guard Honors Team among other military proceedings to honor fallen servicemembers from all generations. (Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

20160530-Z-PL933-149
Congressman Kurt Schrader, U.S. Representative for Oregon's 5th Congressional District, speaks to more than 300 guests during a Memorial Day commemoration ceremony at Willamette National Cemetery, Portland, Oregon, May 30. The event featured guest speakers; Congressman Kurt Schrader and Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, The Adjutant General, Oregon, a 21-gun salute and playing of taps by the Oregon Army National Guard Honors Team among other military proceedings to honor fallen servicemembers from all generations. (Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

160530-Z-IW846-044
Brig. Gen. Mark A. Crosby, Commander of Joint Domestic Operations, Oregon National Guard, takes part in a Memorial Day ceremony in Tigard, May 30. The event featured guest speakers; Brig. Gen. Mark Crosby, Daniel Swain and others, a 21-gun salute and playing of taps by the Oregon Army National Guard Honors Team among other military proceedings to honor fallen servicemembers from all generations. (Photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven Conklin Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

160530-Z-IW846-046
Brig. Gen. Mark A. Crosby, Commander of Joint Domestic Operations, Oregon National Guard, listens as Daniel Swain, Tigard Police Officer and Staff Sergeant in the Air Force Reserve's 304th Rescue Squadron speaks during a Memorial Day ceremony in Tigard, May 30. The event featured guest speakers; Brig. Gen. Mark Crosby, Daniel Swain and others, a 21-gun salute and playing of taps by the Oregon Army National Guard Honors Team among other military proceedings to honor fallen servicemembers from all generations. (Photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven Conklin Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)


Attached Media Files: Brig. Gen. Mark A. Crosby, Commander of Joint Domestic Operations, Oregon National Guard, listens as Daniel Swain, Tigard Police Officer and Staff Sergeant in the Air Force Reserve's 304th Rescue Squadron speaks during a Memorial Day ceremony in Tigard, M , Brig. Gen. Mark A. Crosby, Commander of Joint Domestic Operations, Oregon National Guard, takes part in a Memorial Day ceremony in Tigard, May 30. The event featured guest speakers; Brig. Gen. Mark Crosby, Daniel Swain and others, a 21-gun salute and play , Congressman Kurt Schrader, U.S. Representative for Oregon's 5th Congressional District, speaks to more than 300 guests during a Memorial Day commemoration ceremony at Willamette National Cemetery, Portland, Oregon, May 30. The event featured guest speaker , Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, the Adjutant General, Oregon, speaks to more than 300 guests during a Memorial Day commemoration ceremony at Willamette National Cemetery, Portland, Oregon, May 30. The event featured guest speakers; Congressman Kurt Schrader an , Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, the Adjutant General, Oregon, speaks to more than 300 guests during a Memorial Day commemoration ceremony at Willamette National Cemetery, Portland, Oregon, May 30. The event featured guest speakers; Congressman Kurt Schrader an , Members of the Portland Sea Cadets Color Guard march forward through more than 300 visitors to post the National and State flags, beginning a Memorial Day commemoration ceremony at Willamette National Cemetery, Portland, Oregon, May 30. The event featured , Brig. Gen. Mark A. Crosby, Commander of Joint Domestic Operations, Oregon National Guard, speaks to a crowd during a Memorial Day ceremony in Tigard, May 30. The event featured guest speakers; Brig. Gen. Mark Crosby, Daniel Swain and others, a 21-gun salu , Brig. Gen. Mark A. Crosby, Commander of Joint Domestic Operations, Oregon National Guard, pledges allegiance to the U.S. flag alongside Tigard Police Department's Daniel Swain, a member of the Air Force Reserve's 304th Rescue Squadron based out of Portlan
***Names Released*** Motorcyclist Killed, Another Injured In Crash On Interstate 5 - Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/30/16 2:32 PM
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The operator of the 2008 Harley Davidson, John J SOULE III, age 39, of Gold Hill was declared deceased on scene. The operator of the 2012 Harley Davidson, Joshua J MACDONALD POSE, age 29, of Medford was taken to Providence Medical Center with serious injuries.

Another driver who had been following the motorcycles stopped at the scene. This driver, Mitchel W HENSLEY, age 33, of Gold Hill, was subsequently arrest for DUII -- Alcohol.

No further information to release at this time.

End Release

Previous Release:
On May 29, 2016 at about 11:00pm OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of two motorcycles crashing on Interstate 5 southbound near milepost 44 (4 miles south of Rogue River).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2008 Harley Davidson motorcycle and a 2012 Harley Davidson motorcycle were southbound on Interstate 5 and left the roadway as they entered a right hand curve. One of the riders, a 29 year old male, was transported to Providence Medical Center with serious injuries. The other rider, a 39 year old male, was declared deceased on scene by emergency personnel.

OSP was assisted by the Jackson County Sheriff's Office, the Oregon Department of Transportation, the Jackson County District Attorney's Office and the Rogue River Fire District. Alcohol and speed are believed to be contributing factors in the crash.

More Information will be released after the family of the deceased has been notified.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1002/94836/20160530_013201.jpg , 2016-05/1002/94836/20160530_013132.jpg
Sun. 05/29/16
***Names Released*** Two Killed In Early Morning Crash On Highway 126 East Of Springfield - Lane County
Oregon State Police - 05/29/16 4:38 PM
The driver of the Mazda was identified as Brett V WILDGEN, age 46, of Springfield. The driver of the Honda was identified as Kenndra J HANEY, age 21, of Springfield. The passenger of the Honda was identified as Chase T HOLDEN, age 19 of Springfield.

More information will be released when appropriate as this is an ongoing investigation.

End Release

Previous Release:
On May 29, 2016 at about 12:40AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle head-on crash on Highway 26 near milepost 26 (near Leaburg).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 1990 Mazda pickup was traveling eastbound on Highway 126 when it crossed the centerline and struck a westbound 2004 Honda Civic head-on. Both drivers were declared deceased on scene by emergency personnel. A male passenger in the Honda was taken to Sacred Heart Riverbend for treatment of life threatening injuries.

The highway was shut down for approximately one hour. McKenzie Fire assisted with medical transport and extrication of the occupants. The Oregon Department of Transportation also assisted. Alcohol consumption by the driver of the Mazda is being considered as the contributing factor in the crash.

More information will be released after families have been notified.
Fri. 05/27/16
Oregon State Library Board Meeting, Salem, 6/10/16
Oregon State Library - 05/27/16 2:35 PM
The Oregon State Library Board will meet at the State Library in Salem on Friday June 10, 2016 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Aletha Bonebrake of Baker City will chair the meeting.

At the meeting on June 10th, the board will hold public hearings on proposed administrative rules and consider adoption of those rules. They will also consider recommendations of the Library Services and Technology Act Advisory Council and the Talking Book and Braille Library Advisory Council. An open forum is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. Anyone may address the board on any topic at the open forum.

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested prior to 48 hours before the meeting; notice prior to 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats prior to 72 hours before the meeting. Requests may be made to Jessica Rondema at 503-378-2464.



OREGON STATE LIBRARY BOARD MEETING
June 10, 2016
Oregon State Library
Room 103
Salem, OR
Aletha Bonebrake, Chair

Agenda


9:00 a.m. Approval of the Minutes of the April 20, 2016 Meeting Bonebrake

9:05 Reports of Board Chair and Members Bonebrake
Nominating Committee Report Malkin

9:30 Public Hearing for OAR 543 (State Library Board) Bonebrake

10:00 Public Hearing on OAR 543 (Government Information Services) Bonebrake

10:30 Staff Reports

11:30 Open Forum Bonebrake

Noon Lunch

1:00 New Business:
2017-2019 Budget Request Dahlgreen/Range
Adoption of OAR 543 Bonebrake
Library Services and Technology Act Advisory Council Recommendations Ibsen/Westin
Talking Book and Braille Advisory Council Recommendations Westin


3:00 Adjournment Bonebrake


Any person may address the Oregon State Library Board at this meeting on any topic.


NOTE: The times of all agenda items are approximate and subject to change.
Client and Staff Safety Task Force to meet Tuesday, May 31 in Salem -- agenda now available
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/27/16 12:21 PM
The Client and Staff Safety Task Force meeting is planned for Tuesday, May 31, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Oregon State Capitol, 900 Court Street NE Salem in Hearing Room B. This meeting is open to the public.

The conference phone number for those who can't attend in person is: 1-877-873-8017; enter participant code: 772325# when prompted.

The task force, which was created by Senate Bill 226, is directed to make recommendations on staff safety, resident care, and operation of the Stabilization and Crisis Units. The task force will meet approximately six times and provide a report to the Legislature by September 15, 2016.

The task force will consider and make recommendations for:
Ensuring the dignity and self-determination of each resident in a Stabilization and Crisis Unit;
Improving the safety of staff employed by a Stabilization and Crisis Unit;
Improving the training and support for staff;
Staffing levels;
Reducing incidents of aggressive and assaultive behavior by residents;
Reducing the need for staff to work overtime;
Improving access to appropriate mental health supports and intervention methods;
Ensuring the timely transition of residents in Stabilization and Crisis Units when ready to be placed with a residential service provider in the community, including recommendations for building capacity in community-based care settings.

An agenda is attached.

All meetings of this Task Force are open to the public and will conform to Oregon public meetings laws.

Request for an accommodation for a person with disabilities should be made to Angie Allbee at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting. For more information, contact Angie Allbee, DHS Legislative Coordinator, at 503-689-5034.


Attached Media Files: Agenda
Oregon Air National Guard flyovers scheduled for Memorial Day holiday (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 05/27/16 11:48 AM
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SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Air National Guard is scheduled to conduct Memorial Day flyovers for ceremonies at locations throughout Oregon.

F-15 Eagle fighter jets from both the 173rd Fighter Wing in Klamath Falls, Oregon, and the 142nd Fighter Wing in Portland, Oregon, are scheduled to conduct flyovers at the following community locations at or near the designated times on Monday, May 30.

"We'd like to give a special thank you to the approving authorities this year, authorizing our Oregon communities across the state to commemorate this Memorial Day with flyovers in remembrance of our fallen heroes," said Stephen Bomar, Director of Public Affairs for the Oregon Military Department.

Memorial Day, or Decoration Day as it was originally called, was first observed on May 30, 1868 as a day to place flowers on the graves of Union and Confederate Soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery. The holiday's name was later changed to Memorial Day in 1971 and became a federal holiday to be observed on the last Monday in May.

The 173rd Fighter Wing is scheduled to conduct the following flyovers:
11:03 a.m., NCAA Men's Golf Championship, Eugene, Oregon.
11:20 a.m., Memorial Day Ceremony, Eagle Point, Oregon.
11:35 a.m., Memorial Day Ceremony, Klamath Falls, Oregon.
11:50 a.m., Veterans Memorial Ceremony, Gold Beach, Oregon.
12:10 p.m., Memorial Day Ceremony, Riverside Park, Grants Pass, Oregon.
12:20 p.m., Memorial Day Ceremony, Grants Pass, Oregon.

The 142nd Fighter Wing is scheduled to conduct the following flyovers:
10:12 a.m., Willamette National Cemetery Memorial Day Program, Portland, Oregon.
10:30 a.m., City of Wasco, Wasco, Oregon.
11:10 a.m., Memorial Day Ceremony Veterans Memorial Park, Beaverton, Oregon.
11:15 a.m., Crescent Grove Cemetery Memorial Day Ceremony, Tigard, Oregon.

All passes will be approximately 1,000 feet above ground level and about 400 mph airspeed. Flights could be canceled or times changed due to inclement weather or operational contingencies.

The Oregon Air National Guard has been an integral part of the nation's air defense since 1941 proudly committed to honor communities for 75 years. The 142nd Fighter Wing guards the Pacific Northwest skies from northern California to the Canadian border, on 24-hour alert as part of the North American Air Defense system. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15 pilot training school.

PHOTO CAPTION: Oregon Air National Guard F-15 Eagle fighter jets from both the 173rd Fighter Wing in Klamath Falls, Oregon, and the 142nd Fighter Wing in Portland, Oregon, are scheduled to conduct Memorial Day flyovers for ceremonies at locations throughout Oregon. (Courtesy photo by Scott Wolff of FighterSweep.com)


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/962/94800/142FW_and_173FW_F-15_flight.jpg
Governor's Commission on Senior Services will meet Thursday, June 9 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/27/16 10:50 AM
The Governor's Commission on Senior Services will meet on Thursday June 9, 2016 from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, 500 Summer St. NE, Room 166, Salem.
The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes: planning for the commission's October 12 conference at the CH2M HILL Alumni Center at Oregon State University in Corvallis; budget discussion; upcoming executive committee elections; public comment, regular commission business; general announcements and upcoming events.

People can also call into the meeting or attend through a webinar: The conference line is: 1-888-363-4735; code: 3439085; or https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/815560469.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Kelsey Gleeson at Kelsey.Gleeson@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For questions about the meeting, please contact: Rebecca Arce, policy analyst at Rebecca.E.Arce@state.or.us.
# # #
DOGAMI Governing Board to meet June 10 in Portland
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 05/27/16 10:48 AM
PORTLAND, Ore. - The Governing Board of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) will meet at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, June 10 at DOGAMI's Portland offices, 800 NE Oregon St., Ste. 965.

The meeting agenda is available at www.OregonGeology.org

The DOGAMI Governing Board sets policy and oversees general operations, and adopts a strategic plan every six years to guide DOGAMI's mission and objectives. The Board meets at least quarterly. As active members of their communities, Board members provide an important connection between Oregonians and DOGAMI's mission of providing earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous.
Thu. 05/26/16
Homicide Investigation Continuing In Milton-Freewater - Umatilla County
Oregon State Police - 05/26/16 8:06 PM
On Thursday May 26th, 2016 at approximately 10:20am Milton-Freewater Police were dispatched to 362 NE 13th Avenue in Milton-Freewater for a reported stabbing. Upon arrival officers located an adult male, an adult female, a two year old male child and a four year old female child suffering from stab and cut wounds.

The adults and children were transported to St. Mary's Hospital in Walla Walla with differing levels of injuries. At the request of the Milton-Freewater Police Department, the Oregon State Police assumed lead of the investigation and activated the Umatilla County Major Crime Team.

Preliminary investigation revealed the adult male was identified as Oscar VILLEGAS GARCIA, age 26, of Milton-Freewater suffered serious cuts wounds which are believed to be self-inflicted. Maria VILLEGAS, age 24, of Milton-Freewater suffered from stab wounds and died as a result of her injuries at St. Mary's Hospital. The four year old female child was transferred via air ambulance to Sacred Heart Hospital in Spokane Washington for further treatment. The two year old male child was treated at St. Mary's.

Oscar VILLEGAS GARCIA was treated and released from St. Mary's. Upon his release, VILLEGAS GARCIA was taken into custody by the Walla Walla Police Department related to this incident and lodged at the Walla Walla County Jail.

Agencies assisting in the investigation are the Umatilla County District Attorney's Office, Milton-Freewater Police Department, Hermiston Police Department, Pendleton Police Department, Umatilla County Sheriff's Office, Walla Walla Police Department, Walla Walla County Sheriff's Office, Spokane Police Department, Oregon Department of Humans Services and Washington Department of Child Protective Services.

No further information will be released at this time. Any further information will only be released by the Umatilla County District Attorney.
Search Warrant execution yields heroin arrest
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/26/16 5:01 PM
Released by: Sgt. Deke De Mars

Date of incident: 5/26/16

Time: 11: 16 a.m.

Location: 19609 Manzanita Ln., Bend, Oregon

Arrested Person #1: Prader, Jason age: 38
Bend, Oregon

Charges:

Probation Violation, no bail
Unlawful Delivery of Heroin, bail $ 20,000.00

Unlawful Possession of Heroin, bail $15,000.00

On 5/26/16, Deputies assisted the Detectives with the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Street Crimes Unit with the execution of a search warrant at 19609 Manzanita Ln in Deschutes River Woods. The residence was part of a short term investigation regarding the street level sales and possession of methamphetamine and heroin.

During the search warrant Prader was found to be in possession of street level quantities of heroin. Prader was arrested on the listed charges. During a search of the property detectives also located digital scales, methamphetamine and paraphernalia. Evidence of a small inactive butane honey oil operation was located as well. "Butane honey oil" is an extremely potent form of hashish (marijuana). Its "dabs" of oil can be vaporized and inhaled for an intense high, without marijuana's pungent smell. The manufacture of Butane Honey Oil (BHO) is illegal by Oregon Revised Statue unless the manufacturer is a licensee or licensee representative which is acting in compliance with ORS 475B.245. Violation is a Class B Felony.

This investigation is ongoing.


The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Street Crimes Unit focuses enforcement on street level drug cases and quality of life issues connected to property crimes, such as theft and burglaries throughout Deschutes County. The Street Crimes Unit works in partnership with law enforcement agencies throughout Deschutes County to detect and deter the flow of illegal drugs into our community.
OSP Continuing Investigation into Fatal Motorcycle Crash - Gilliam County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/26/16 4:55 PM
Photo
Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1002/94781/thumb_DSC_0137.jpg
Oregon State Police troopers from The Dalles Area Command are continuing their investigation into a fatal motorcycle crash that took the life of an Edmonton, Alberta man.

On May 25, 2016 at about 3:45 PM, DARCY DUTERTRE, age 49 of Edmonton, Alberta Canada was driving a 2010 Yamaha motorcycle northbound on Highway 19 approximately 17 miles south of Arlington, Oregon. As DUTERTRE entered a sharp right hand curve, he drove into the oncoming lane and laid his bike over. DUTERTRE was struck by a southbound 2008 Dodge service truck driven by EDUARDO ZUNIGA-GONZALEZ, age 23 of Condon, Oregon.

While the crash remains under investigation, neither alcohol nor speed appears to have been a factor. High wind gusts were present during the time of the crash.

The Oregon State Police was assisted by the Gilliam County Sheriff's Office, the Oregon Department of Transportation, Gilliam County Fire and Rescue, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.


Attached Media Files: Photo
Lead levels drop, but hexavalent chromium persists in SE Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 05/26/16 3:50 PM
EDITORS: Brian Boling and Keith Johnson of DEQ, and David Farrer of OHA are available today to discuss air monitoring results and health risks. Contact their agencies' communications staffers to set up an interview.

May 26, 2016

Slight increase in cadmium still below 24-hour screening levels

Levels of lead monitored for the period ending May 11 show that levels in the air decreased following spikes detected in monitors on May 9 and 10 that were likely connected to Bullseye Glass Co. in southeast Portland.

Results of monitoring on May 11 showed lead levels have returned to those seen in previous months of monitoring, and are well below the 24-hour screening level--the short-term concentration above which immediate negative health effects could occur.

Hexavalent chromium levels are still averaging above 12-month health goals, known as ambient benchmark concentrations. Investigators at the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality continue to seek the source of these emissions.

Levels of cadmium in the air at the Children's Creative Learning Center (CCLC) in southeast Portland showed an increase on three days--May 6, 9 and 10--during the monitoring period, but did not exceed the 24-hour screening level. The increase caused the average cadmium level to go above the long-term health-based goals. State officials will continue to watch these levels.

"We are investigating several aspects of how Bullseye operates, including its production processes, maintenance procedures and raw material handling, to better understand what the cause of these cadmium and hexavalent chromium readings may be," said Keith Johnson, manager with DEQ's Northwest Region.

Concentrations below short-term health risk levels

Arsenic continues to average above long-term health based goals. Both the increased cadmium and arsenic averages, however, remain well below the Oregon 24-hour screening level, and for arsenic, is consistent with levels that would typically be found in urban environments.

During the past week, lead levels have dropped from a high of 669 nanograms per cubic meter of air (ng/m3) to 65 ng/m3, which is below the threshold at which lead would pose any immediate risk to people.

10-week averages for metals

The attached table lists the 10-week average concentrations compared with what's expected in urban environments (urban background), and the health-based target (ambient benchmark).

Comparison values for metals in air are posted online at: http://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/TrackingAssessment/EnvironmentalHealthAssessment/Documents/metals/comparison-values-metals-in-air.pdf.

The air monitor at CCLC is one of five monitoring devices, operating 24 hours a day, that DEQ placed around southeast Portland near Bullseye to measure levels of heavy metals in the air. There is also one air monitor near Uroboros Glass in north Portland.

DEQ continues its search for the source of hexavalent chromium readings that have stayed elevated since March 1. The agency has visited several industrial sites, including a cement plant, rail yard, trucking facility and chrome-plating facilities near the southeast Portland air monitoring locations.

Bullseye is just one potential source of the higher hexavalent chromium, although it has not used the metal in glass production since mid-February.

Weekly air monitoring data from southeast and north Portland are reported each week by the interagency group that includes DEQ and OHA, and published at SaferAir.Oregon.gov. For information about the Cleaner Air Oregon initiative to align industrial air toxics regulations with human health, visit CleanerAir.Oregon.gov.

DEQ reaches agreement with Uroboros Glass

DEQ on Wednesday executed a Mutual Agreement and Final Order (MAO) with Uroboros that requires the glass-maker to take additional steps to limit its emissions of certain hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) including metals. The MAO was prompted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's determination that the company operates furnaces that are subject to regulation under federal air quality rules.

# # #
Housing Stability Council Monthly Meeting - June 3, 2016
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 05/26/16 11:04 AM
June 3, 2016 | 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Oregon Housing and Community Services, Room 124 A&B
725 Summer St NE | Salem OR 97301
Call-In: 1-877-273-4202 | Participant Code: 4978330

AGENDA:
9:00 Meeting Called to Order
9:05 Public Comment
9:15 Draft Meeting Minutes - May 6, 2016
9:20 Residential Loan Program Consent Calendar
9:30 Housing Trust Fund
9:45 Single Family -- Homeownership Center RFA Awards
10:00 LIFT Update
10:15 Agency Request Budget update
10:45 Report of the Director
11:10 Report of the Chair
11:30 Meeting Adjourned
DHS Town Hall meetings coming to Portland, Salem, Eugene, Medford, Bend and Pendleton in June
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/26/16 10:39 AM
You are invited to provide input and feedback to the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) on our programs, services and priorities for our 2017 budget and legislative session. We've been doing these meetings for several years, and they are a great way to hear directly from the people and communities DHS serves.

Local reporters are encouraged to attend, too!

The Town Hall will cover programs and services in the following areas:
Child Welfare
Aging and People with Disabilities
Intellectual/Developmental Disability Services
Self Sufficiency Programs
Vocational Rehabilitation
DHS Director's Office and other Central Services

Your participation is extremely valuable to us as we make plans to move forward, so make plans to attend a meeting in your local area!

Monday, June 20
PORTLAND: Creston Elementary School, Auditorium, 4701 SE Bush Street, right off Powell Blvd
1:00 pm -- 3:00 pm
Please let us know if you plan to attend: DHS Director's Office -- Use subject line PORTLAND

Tuesday, June 21
SALEM: Chemeketa Community College, Auditorium, 4000 Lancaster Drive NE
1:00 pm -- 3:00 pm
Please let us know if you plan to attend: DHS Director's Office -- Use subject line SALEM

Wednesday, June 22
EUGENE: Lane Community College, Center for Meeting & Learning #104, 4000 E 30th Avenue
1:00 pm -- 3:00 pm)
Please let us know if you plan to attend: DHS Director's Office -- Use subject line EUGENE

Thursday, June 23
MEDFORD: North Medford High School, Auditorium, 1900 N Keene Way Drive
(10:00 am -- 12:00 noon)
Please let us know if you plan to attend: DHS Director's Office -- Use subject line MEDFORD

Monday, June 27
BEND: The Riverhouse Convention Center, Cascade AJ Room, 3075 N. Business 97
10:00 am -- 12:00 noon
Please let us know if you plan to attend: DHS Director's Office -- Use subject line BEND

Tuesday, June 28
PENDLETON: Vert Auditorium, 480 SW Dorion Avenue
1:00 pm -- 3:00 pm
Please let us know if you plan to attend: DHS Director's Office -- Use subject line PENDLETON

###
Wed. 05/25/16
Evergreen Museum to host Wall of Honor May 26 - May 30
Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum - 05/25/16 8:36 PM
MCMINNVILLE, ORE. (May 25, 2016) -- Evergreen Museum is humbled to display the Wall of Honor in the Evergreen Theater from May 26 -- May 30.

This exhibit has been brought to the Museum by American Legion Post 21 and KLYC radio.

"With over 250 volunteers, some of which served in conflicts back to WWII, we do all we can to show our support for those who lost their lives in combat or fought gallantly for our country," said Ann Witsil, Interim Executive Director for the Museum. "Guests will walk through our Oregon Aviation Hall of Honor, a display that recognizes aviators from Oregon that have made a significant impact on aviation, to the Wall of Honor, a display of photos and names of all those that have lost their lives since 9/11. The Wall of Honor is an amazing tribute that we are thrilled to have on the Museum Campus."

Special Events around The Wall of Honor:

May 26 Opening Day Ceremony 9am Compass Rose near Evergreen Theater
May 30 Memorial Day Service 2:30pm

Location of the Wall: Evergreen Theater - 1st floor Conference Room
Date: May 26 - May 30, 2016
Cost: Free of Charge
Hours:
9am - 5pm Daily Accessible through the front doors of the Theater
Friday, May 27 5pm - Midnight
Saturday, May 28 12:01am - Midnight
Sunday, May 29 5pm - Midnight
Monday, May 30 9am - 5pm
After 5pm you must enter through the west ramp of theater through the side door.

Thank you to the Sea Cadet Honor Guard from Friday 7pm to Saturday 7pm. Come! Be Inspired!


About the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum
Located in the heart of Oregon's Willamette Valley wine country, the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum ("EASM") is the home of the world's largest wooden flying boat, the "Spruce Goose," the SR-71 "Blackbird," and the Titan II SLV Missile. Located on over 200 acres and encompassing four massive and magnificent buildings, the EASM exhibits more than 200 historic aircraft, spacecraft, accessible to visitors of all ages and enhanced with artwork and traveling exhibits. The Museum values its educational mission "to inspire and educate" and it's partnerships with the Academy of Model Aeronautics, the NASA Jet Propulsion Lab, the Oregon Space Consortium and the Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program, and scores of regional educational institutions.

The Museum facility is located at 500 NE Captain Michael King Smith Way, across the highway from the McMinnville Airport and about three miles southeast of McMinnville, Ore., on Highway 18. The Museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Regular visitor admission is required. Call 503-434-4180 or visit www.evergreenmuseum.org for more information.

####
BPA celebrates 75th anniversary of Woody Guthrie's Columbia River songs (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 05/25/16 3:11 PM
In celebration of the 75th anniversary of Guthrie's Columbia River songs, BPA is a community sponsor of the "Woody Guthrie Day" event at Grand Coulee Dam, Saturday, May 28.
In celebration of the 75th anniversary of Guthrie's Columbia River songs, BPA is a community sponsor of the "Woody Guthrie Day" event at Grand Coulee Dam, Saturday, May 28.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1236/94736/thumb_Woody-Guthrie-Day-Event-Poster.jpg
Folksinger wrote 26 songs promoting the Columbia River, benefits of new hydroelectric dams

Portland, Ore. - Seventy-five years ago, legendary folksinger and songwriter Woody Guthrie wrote 26 songs for the Bonneville Power Administration. During his month of employment in the spring of 1941, Guthrie traveled across Oregon and Washington and visited towns, farms, Native American locales and the construction site of Grand Coulee Dam in northeast Washington. Inspired by the people he met and his own observations and experiences, Guthrie wrote a collection of songs about the Columbia River and the benefits new federal hydroelectric dams would bring to the people of the Northwest.

"He plucked tunes about the people, the mighty Columbia River, the beautiful Northwest landscape, and the promise of prosperity from new hydroelectric dams," said Libby Burke, archivist in BPA's library. "The construction of the Grand Coulee and Bonneville dams brought electricity, irrigation for crops and jobs at a time when many folks were desperate for work following the Great Depression."

The songs Guthrie wrote in his employment at BPA are known collectively as "The Columbia River Songs." The titles include, "Roll On, Columbia," "Grand Coulee Dam," "Pastures of Plenty" and "The Biggest Thing that Man has Ever Done," and some later became part of Northwest and American musical tradition.

In celebration of this 75th anniversary, Washington Governor Jay Inslee proclaimed May 28 as "Woody Guthrie Day" in the state of Washington. BPA is one of the community sponsors of the "Woody Guthrie Day" event (www.woodyguthrieday.com) at Grand Coulee Dam, Saturday, May 28.

"We're excited to celebrate the music of this great American songwriter and his 30-day employment with us back in 1941," Burke added.

The free event includes music all day on the big lawn, film screenings, a booth highlighting the history of Guthrie's songwriting for BPA, historical presentations, and readings and signings of "26 Songs in 30 Days: Woody Guthrie's Columbia River Songs and the Planned Promised Land in the Pacific Northwest," a new book by Seattle KEXP radio host Greg Vandy that was researched at BPA's library in Portland, Ore. This will also be the opening weekend of the Grand Coulee Dam laser show, which will follow the programs.

BPA is also hosting an anniversary celebration of the Columbia River songs on Woody Guthrie's 104th birthday, July 14, from 2 to 3:30 p.m. at its headquarters in Portland. The event, which is open to the public, will feature a presentation about Guthrie's songwriting for BPA, screening of film clips, an interview with author Greg Vandy and BPA researcher Libby Burke, as well as a book signing by Vandy. Half of the sales of his "26 Songs in 30 Days" book will benefit the Northwest Federal Employees Association's scholarship fund.

Woody Guthrie was hired to write music for a BPA-produced movie about Columbia River power. The film called, "The Columbia," was abandoned before completion due to the start of World War II. It was finally finished in 1949, after footage of the Vanport flood offered the writer and producer, BPA's Stephen B. Kahn, an opportunity to include flood control in the film as a case for continued federal dam building. However, all the film prints that were known -- along with the 1939 film, "Hydro," and many public power promotional pamphlets and materials -- were destroyed in 1953 and for the most part forgotten.

Four decades later, employee Bill Murlin, who worked in BPA's public affairs office, discovered Guthrie's name in the film credits while looking for material for BPA's 50th anniversary. Over the next several years, Murlin researched Guthrie's wildly productive month of songwriting, ultimately leading to BPA's release of a songbook and the recordings.

BPA recently released two collections of films that include "The Columbia" and the 1987 film "River of Power," which features some of Guthrie's original demo recordings tracked down by Murlin. To view or learn more about BPA's films, visit: www.bpa.gov/goto/films. Free DVD copies may be ordered from the BPA Library and Visitor Center.

For a gallery of Guthrie images, go to: https://flic.kr/s/aHskAr8NYu. To watch a video that showcases his music from the 1949 film "The Columbia," go to: https://youtu.be/H3muvp154_k.


Attached Media Files: In celebration of the 75th anniversary of Guthrie's Columbia River songs, BPA is a community sponsor of the "Woody Guthrie Day" event at Grand Coulee Dam, Saturday, May 28. , The 26 songs Woody Guthrie wrote for BPA in 1941 are known today as "The Columbia River Songs."
Precautions Urged to Help Save Bats (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 05/25/16 1:34 PM
Close up photo of little brown bat confirmed with white-nose syndrome from King County, Washington Photo credit: Progressive Animal Welfare Society (PAWS)
Close up photo of little brown bat confirmed with white-nose syndrome from King County, Washington Photo credit: Progressive Animal Welfare Society (PAWS)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/5514/94734/thumb_25885296590_b14b9b1428_o.jpg
Portland, Ore. - This Memorial Day weekend, visitors using public lands are encouraged to help fight the spread of white-nose syndrome and save bats in the Pacific Northwest.

White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a fungal disease that has devastated bat populations in eastern North America, killing an estimated six million bats since 2006. In March 2016, Washington's first case of WNS was confirmed 30 miles east of Seattle.

WNS is primarily spread by bat-to-bat contact. Pets, other animals, and humans and their equipment - including clothing, footwear, and gear - can transfer spores of the fungus to new locations. The disease is not known to pose a threat to humans, pets, or other animal species.

To avoid the spread of WNS, federal land management and state wildlife agencies ask that visitors to bat-friendly locations - such as caves, rock cliffs, buildings, talus areas, talus caverns, mines, or human-made structures - follow these important recommendations:

- Whenever possible, avoid disturbing bats and entering areas where bats may be living. This includes abandoned mines, caves, and abandoned buildings and structures.

- Do not handle bats, as they have reduced energy and fat stores in the spring following a lengthy hibernation. Some bats can carry the rabies virus, a deadly disease carried by less than 1% of Pacific Northwest bats.

- Report sick, injured, and dead bats, or groups of bats. In Washington, report such findings to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife at www.wdfw.wa.gov/bats. In Oregon, report to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife at http://www.dfw.state.or.us/wildlife/health_program/WNS/reporting.asp or call the ODFW toll free line at 866-968-2600.

- Prohibit dogs from accessing areas where bats may be roosting.

People who come into contact with areas where bats live should follow these steps to keep from spreading the WNS fungus:

- Clean shoes and clothing of any dirt or mud before entering and after exiting a cave or climbing area, and change into clean clothing and shoes before entering a vehicle to leave.

- Wear different footwear at each visit to a cave or climbing area, unless completely cleaned after each visit.

- Wash hands and exposed skin after each visit to a cave or climbing area.

- Wash clothing, hats, gear, and shoes worn in caves in hot, soapy water at 131ºF (55ºC) or hotter for at least 20 minutes. Clean equipment that cannot be washed with alcohol wipes if the wipes will not damage the equipment.

Wildlife agencies including the WDFW, ODFW, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - along with land management partners the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, and U. S. Geological Survey - are cooperating in the response efforts with many other state, local, and private organizations.

Bats play an important role in a healthy environment and economy, eating tons of crop and forest pests and saving farmers billions of dollars each year.

Additional resources and information may be found at www.whitenosesyndrome.org.

- END-


Attached Media Files: News Release , Close up photo of little brown bat confirmed with white-nose syndrome from King County, Washington Photo credit: Progressive Animal Welfare Society (PAWS)
Drug arrest near Sisters yields over one pound of Methamphetamine and a Texas Fugitive (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/25/16 1:15 PM
Methamphetamine seized as evidence
Methamphetamine seized as evidence
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/5227/94733/thumb_Meth_arrest-_Suehs_and_Binkley.JPG
Released by: Sgt. Deke Demars, Detective Division, Street Crimes Unit

Date of incident: 5/25/16

Time: 8:30 p.m.

Location: Highway 20 West at Suttle Lake, 12 miles west of Sisters, Oregon

Arrested Person #1: Suehs, Mason age: 34
Portland, Oregon

Charges: Unlawful Manufacture of Methamphetamine, bail $15,000.00
Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine, bail $15,000.00
Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine, bail $10,000.00


Arrested Person #2: Binkley, Tyler age: 29
Portland, Oregon

Charges: Unlawful Manufacture of Methamphetamine, bail $15,000.00
Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine, bail $15,000.00
Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine, bail $10,000.00
Warrant- Possession of a controlled substance, out of Texas, bail $6000.00

Vehicle:


On 5/24/16, Detectives with the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Street Crimes Unit developed information that Mason Suehs would be traveling from the Portland area with a commercial quantity of methamphetamine, which he planned to sell within Deschutes County.

With the assistance of the CODE team (Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team), Street Crimes Detectives stopped Suehs on Highway 20 at the entrance to Suttle Lake, approximately 12 miles west of Sisters.

Suehs and his passenger, Tyler Binkley, were found to be in possession of over one pound of methamphetamine. This amount of methamphetamine has an approximate street value of $15,000 to $20,000. The methamphetamine was destined to be delivered to smaller user quantity dealers throughout Deschutes County. They were also in possession of digital scales and packaging materials, which are used to weigh drugs and break down into smaller quantities for sale.

Suehs was arrested and lodged at the Deschutes County Adult Jail on the following charges: Unlawful Manufacture of Methamphetamine, bail $15,000.00, Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine, bail $15,000.00 and Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine, bail $10,000.00.

Binkley was arrested and lodged at the Deschutes County Adult Jail on the following charges: Unlawful Manufacture of Methamphetamine, bail $15,000.00, Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine, bail $15,000.00 and Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine, bail $10,000.00.

In addition to the drug charges on Binkley, he was wanted out of Texas on a warrant for the Possession of a Controlled Substance, with a bail of $6000.00. Binkley will remain in custody, awaiting extradition proceedings regarding the warrant out of Texas.

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Street Crimes Unit focuses enforcement on street level drug cases and quality of life issues connected to property crimes, such as theft and burglaries throughout Deschutes County. The Street Crimes Unit works in partnership with the CODE team and law enforcement agencies throughout Deschutes County to detect and deter the flow of illegal drugs into our community.


Attached Media Files: Methamphetamine seized as evidence
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Earns A 100% on Jail Standards Re-Certification
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/25/16 12:12 PM
Released by: Sheriff L. Shane Nelson
May 25, 2016


The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Adult Jail earned re-certification on April 28 and 29th, the Deschutes County Adult Jail passed compliance of jail standards as established by the Oregon State Sheriffs' Association (OSSA). The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office received 100% compliance of all 309 jail standards including staff review, revision, training and implementation of over 225 policy and procedures for the Deschutes County Adult Jail, and demonstrated superior professional practices in the performance of its responsibilities.

A five-member team of trained jail inspectors from Klamath, Lane, Benton and Washington counties and NORCO (Northern Oregon Regional Correctional Facilities) determined the Deschutes County Jail to be in full compliance of the jail standards as set by the Oregon Sheriff's Jail Command Council and OSSA. In 2010 and 2014, the jail was also found to be 100% compliant of all jail standards.

The inspection team was very impressed with the cleanliness of the facility, deputy's interactions with the inmates, and the amount of time and dedication spent on organizing the standard files.

Lead Jail Inspector, Lt. Jeanette Davidson, Klamath County Sheriff's Office stated, "The Oregon State Sheriffs' Association Inspection Team 6 conducted an Oregon Jail Standards compliance inspection of the Deschutes County Jail on April 28th and 29th. We found the Deschutes County Jail to be 100% compliant with Oregon Jail Standards. The policy and proof provided was top notch. There were several levels of proof that demonstrated that the jail staff complied with their own practice and policy and therefore complied with the particular standard being reviewed."

"The Deschutes County Jail was in great shape as far as the physical plant and the cleanliness and sanitation that was evident during our inspection. Of particular note was the new addition to the jail. It was obvious that the design was made with input from the staff who would be running the operation in that area. Several inspectors commented on the attention to details that would make the new addition a particularly safe and secure place for both staff and inmates," Lt. Davidson said.

Lt. Davidson concluded, "Staff at the Deschutes County Jail was very professional and courteous to the inspection team, to inmates and to each other. It was obvious to our inspection team that the Mission of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office is not merely words on paper, but the Mission is an integral part of the character and integrity of the staff that work for the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office."

In 1998, the Oregon Sheriff's Jail Command Council developed the best practice and best professional standards for Oregon jails. The goal of these standards is to ensure that jails are operated safely and efficiently. In addition, jails are reviewed for quality of care of inmates, use of resources and safe operations for inmates as well as correctional staff.

"Through consistent application of the Oregon Accreditation Alliance standards and the Oregon Jail Standards professional standards for Oregon jails, the employees of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office are well-trained and well-prepared. We are dedicated to earning the public's trust. The evaluations as set by the Oregon Accreditation Alliance standards and the Oregon Jail Standards are the guiding light for our agency. This is an outstanding accomplishment for our Sheriff's Office and the citizens of Deschutes County. We 'Proudly Serve Our Community'," said Sheriff Nelson.
Fireworks and Exploding Targets Ban
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 05/25/16 11:27 AM
Portland, Ore. -- As we approach Memorial Day, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service want to remind everyone that the use of fireworks and exploding targets is prohibited on all BLM-managed public lands and U.S. National Forests throughout Oregon and Washington.

So far this year we've already seen 288 fires that have burned over 1,500 acres. In recent years we've had longer fire seasons and fires are burning hotter and longer fueling the costs of fire suppression.

Those who ignite fireworks or exploding targets on BLM-managed lands can be fined up to $1,000, receive a prison term of up to one year, or both. In addition, individuals responsible for starting wildland fires on federal lands can be billed for the cost of fire suppression.
The BLM and the U.S. Forest Service cooperates with the Pacific Northwest Wildfire Coordinating Group to fight wildland fires in the Pacific Northwest. The Geographic Area Coordination Center offers updates on the fire potential regionally and nationally and the NW Coordination Center provides updates in the Pacific Northwest.

To keep up on the latest fire news in the Pacific Northwest be sure to tune in to the weekly Wildland Fire Minute: http://blm.gov/ksmd


Attached Media Files: 2016 Fire Prevention Order , Fireworks Exploding Targets Ban
New state forest recreation rules in place for the summer, aim to reduce conflict and protect resources (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/25/16 10:48 AM
A new bridge in the Tillamook State Forest provides hikers a safe and accessible hike through the forest.
A new bridge in the Tillamook State Forest provides hikers a safe and accessible hike through the forest.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1072/94719/thumb_Elliott_Creek_Trail_Bridge_034.jpg
This release has been posted to the ODF Newsroom here:
http://oregonforestry.wpengine.com/

On any hot summer day, it's not uncommon to find a line of dusty cars and trucks waiting for a riverside spot in the Tillamook State Forest off of Highway 6. Music blares from a packed parking lot as the Wilson River's banks swell with day-trippers cooling off in the water. Jennifer Magby from ODF, and a Tillamook County sheriff direct traffic and answer questions as the line of people zigzag searching for a parking spot.

As state wildfire officials prepare for the summer after three severe wildfire seasons, ODF recreation staff are working nonstop to ensure the increasingly-popular Tillamook, Clatsop and Santiam State Forests are enjoyed by families and twenty-somethings alike, as once-hidden gems now fill with hundreds of visitors.

Through a series of advisory group meetings representing recreation groups and community leaders, public hearings, and an overdue evaluation of the agency's recreation fee structure and campsite capacity, fee revisions and capacity limits have been applied for this summer and beyond.

To continue providing a great experience that visitors have come to expect, ODF revised these recreation rules to keep up with increasing and unsustainable demand for state-owned recreation areas----demand which has outpaced capacity and resources available for management----often resulting in conflicts between user groups and creating major issues for sanitation and the environment, safety, and vandalism.

The new rules provide solutions for alleviating short-term concerns, while providing the tools necessary to address long-term issues.

"As we continue to host significantly more people at our state forest recreation areas, we've worked to put rules and structure in place to create an enjoyable experience for all of our visitors while protecting natural resources and seeking longer-term solutions," said Stephanie Beall, a long-time recreation coordinator for the ODF Forest Grove District. "These rule revisions help us to continue providing the same quality and high level service enjoyed by many over the years while limiting negative interactions with this beautiful area."

These fee revisions are the first in more than twenty years as ODF state forests continue to be the most financially equitable option for local communities looking to experience and enjoy the outdoors for a reasonable price. These fee revisions and camping rule changes include:

Revised fees: drive-in sites are $15 per night; walk-in sites are $10 per night; group sites are $50 per night. Extra vehicles will be charged $5 per night, per vehicle.

A campsite may not be occupied by more than eight people and two motor vehicles, unless otherwise posted.

Registered campers must physically occupy campsites each night during the entire length of their stay. Sites cannot be reserved in advance except for group campsites at select campgrounds.

Other revisions resulting from the rulemaking process include:

All large commercial events of more than fifty people, scheduled for longer than four hours, held on state forestland will require organizers to submit an application for a permit, which can be obtained through a local ODF district office. Office locations can be found here: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/AboutODF/Pages/MapOffices.aspx

All forage or feed used on state forestlands for horses or other animals must be certified weed-free, primarily to avoid introducing invasive species to the area.

ODF will assume custody and remove all abandoned property found after 48 hours in designated recreation areas.

ODF staff and law enforcement reserve the right to exclude or evict visitors not complying with recreation rules.

"Despite the rain and recent cloudy weather, it's still really dry out there," said Mike Cafferata, the district forester for the Forest Grove District. "It's critical that whenever you're enjoying Oregon's state forests, that you always practice fire safety, be aware of dry brush, and help keep your state forests green, safe and clean."

The ODF State Forests Division manages nearly 820,000 acres of state forestlands for greatest permanent value by law, requiring that these lands produce a range of economic, environmental and social benefits. Each year, public comment opportunities provide a forum for feedback on forest management activities, and formal advisory committees comprising of county representatives and forestry professionals meet regularly to guide this work with the Oregon Board of Forestry.

Additional resources

+Watch the video outlining these rules here: https://youtu.be/g5PB-SZPYGA

+Learn more about ODF recreation, including campground locations, trails and other information here: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Recreation/Pages/default.aspx

+Follow local state forest recreation updates in northwest Oregon through the Tillamook State Forest blog here: http://tillamookstateforest.blogspot.com/

+Read an outline of the rules here: http://arcweb.sos.state.or.us/pages/rules/oars_600/oar_629/629_025.html

+Learn more about the accomplishments and ODF contributions to state forest recreation in 2015 here: http://oregonforestry.wpengine.com/archives/1010

+Learn more about Oregon's weed-free forage program and find providers here: https://www.oregon.gov/ODA/programs/MarketAccess/MACertification/Pages/WeedFreeForage.aspx

###


Attached Media Files: A new bridge in the Tillamook State Forest provides hikers a safe and accessible hike through the forest.
Department of Human Services Advocacy and Development Unit will meet Wednesday, June 1 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/25/16 10:08 AM
The Department of Human Services Advocacy and Development Unit will meet with American Sign Language interpreters on Wednesday June 1, 2016 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Employment Department Auditorium, 875 Union St NE, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes an announcement of the Interpreter Services Request for Proposal that will contract with an agency to schedule and provide ASL interpreter services for state agencies. This will be followed by a question and answer session.

People can also call into the meeting: 1-888-808-6929; participant code: 4517555.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Kelsey Gleeson at Kelsey.Gleeson@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the event.

For questions about the meeting, please contact: Theresa Powell, policy analyst at Theresa.A.Powell@state.or.us.
# # #
SB 1515 Ensuring Children are Safe Rulemaking Session Scheduled
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/25/16 9:47 AM
The Oregon Department of Human Services is in the process of implementing Oregon Senate Bill 1515. The bill is designed to make residential care safer for children. It demands changes in the way the Department regulates child caring agencies and responds to reports of abuse or neglect to ensure children are safe.

Please join us for a briefing of SB 1515 on Wednesday, June 8, 2016 from 9-11a.m. in room 137A at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building (500 Summer Street NE) in Salem, Oregon. Attached you will find a draft "SB 1515 Road Map" showing the proposed rule and procedure changes taking effect July 1, 2016.

If you cannot attend in person please call 1-888-204-5984 Participant Code 9874695 to participate by phone. Program staff will be available to describe the planned changes and individuals, stakeholders and the public will have the opportunity to ask questions and provide feedback.

The road map is a work in progress and will change as we continue to solicit and incorporate feedback from internal and external stakeholders. DHS remains committed to providing the general public, individuals and organizations affected by proposed changes in Oregon Administrative Rule and opportunity to participate in the rule making process. Please participate and have your voice heard.

Please email your comments and suggestions to Rules Coordinator Kris.A.Skaro@state.or.us or call her at 503-945-6067.

Visit the SB 1515 web page for news, material and information. https://www.oregon.gov/DHS/CHILDREN/Pages/sb1515.aspx

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Attached Media Files: DRAFT SB 1515 Road map
Free camping and day use on Saturday, June 4 for State Parks Day
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/25/16 9:12 AM
State parks throughout Oregon invite the public to camp and play for free Saturday, June 4 in celebration of State Parks Day.

Camping is free the night of June 4 in traditional sites -- full hookup (sewer, electricity and water), electrical hookup (electricity and water), and tent sites. Parking is free both June 4 and June 5 at the 26 parks that charge a day-use parking fee.

Campsite reservations may be made by calling 800-452-5687 before 5 p.m. June 3. Or, reserve online at www.oregonstateparks.org. While the campsite rental is free, an $8 nonrefundable reservation fee still applies. Of the 52 state park campgrounds, 42 take reservations.

"State Parks Day is our way of thanking Oregonians for their commitment to our state parks," said Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Director Lisa Sumption. "We invite Oregonians to come out and explore a new park or visit an old favorite."

The Oregon State Legislature established Oregon State Parks Day in 1997 to focus public attention on Oregon's state park system. The event is always the first Saturday in June.

Parks throughout the state will host activities including guided hikes--Saturday, June 4 is also National Trails Day--plus open houses, tours, special barbecues and guest appearances by J.R. Beaver, Oregon State Parks mascot.

Silver Falls State Park east of Salem will have free refreshments, a guided waterfall tour and its annual Foot Race Challenge, with a 5K, 6-mile and kids' race. Stub Stewart State Park west of Portland will host a volunteer work party in the morning, followed by free lunch at Hilltop Day-use Area, a guided bike ride, scavenger hunt, skins and skulls display and more. See a fur trappers' encampment at Champoeg State Heritage Area. Walk among the tents and work stations, ask questions of the interpreters and watch demonstrations of trapping, shooting, cooking and packing for the fur trade.

Visitors will also be able to fish, crab and clam without a license June 4-5 for Oregon's Free Fishing Weekend, hosted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). ODFW will provide the gear, bait and instructions at parks around the state, including Benson State Recreation Area in the Columbia River Gorge and Jessie M. Honeyman Memorial State Park and Fort Stevens State Park on the coast. Other free fishing events are listed at www.dfw.state.or.us/education/angling/free_fishing.asp.

For a complete list of events, go to oregonstateparks.org and click on "Things to Do" or go to http://bit.ly/OPRDcalendar
Task Force on School Nursing meets June 3 in Salem
Oregon Health Authority - 05/25/16 8:00 AM
May 25, 2016

What: The monthly public meeting of the Task Force on School Nursing

Agenda: Explore and begin analyzing ideas to fund school nursing in Oregon

When: Friday, June 3, 12:30-3:30 p.m. The meeting is open to the public.

Where: Public Service Building, Basement Room A, 255 Capitol St., Salem

Details: The Task Force on School Nursing is a Governor-appointed task force legislatively mandated by SB 698 (2015). The task force is charged with:
-- Examining health care funding sources to support school health services.
-- Recommending sustainable funding sources for school health services.
-- Recommending standards of school nursing practices.
-- Recommending ways to create a coordinated school health services model that directs an appropriate level of funding to school nursing and school-based health centers.

For any questions related to the Task Force on School Nursing, contact Jamie Smith at 971-673-0724 or jamie.leon.smith@state.or.us.

# # #
Tue. 05/24/16
Department of Justice releases findings in Mays overdose death
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/24/16 5:11 PM
Released by: Sheriff L. Shane Nelson
May 24, 2016

Sheriff L. Shane Nelson today received the Oregon Department of Justice report finding no criminal conduct on the part of the Sheriff's Office deputies on duty on December 14, 2014 when Edwin Burl Mays III died from a methamphetamine overdose.

Sheriff Nelson thanks the Department of Justice investigators and attorneys for their hard work and diligence in this matter.

A copy of the report is attached.

"My condolences go to the Mays family for the death of their loved one. His overdose death is a reminder of the continuing threat of methamphetamine addiction in our community. The unprofessional behavior of deputies on December 14, 2014 was not acceptable and has been dealt with in personnel actions in April 2015," stated Sheriff Nelson.

Over the past year and a half the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office has made these following changes:

We have added full-time nurses for 24 hour/7 days a week staffing in the jail.
We have entered into an ongoing contract with a local ER physician, who has advised the Sheriff's Office in reviewing and developing procedures for nursing staff and deputies in both the corrections and patrol divisions.
We have purchased AliveLock Monitoring wristbands for use in the jail, which monitor heart rate and O2 saturation for inmates who need close medical attention.


We have added naloxone, an antidote for opioid overdoses, to kits for corrections and patrol deputies.
We have added additional automated external defibrillators to the jail and have upgraded the emergency bags in jail.
We added a medical/mental health section of the jail during the expansion, to increase the capacity and improve the monitoring of at risk inmates.

Statement from Sheriff Nelson

"As Sheriff, my job is to provide to Deschutes County the best public safety services we can with our available resources.

We will continue to improve and adjust our Sheriff's Office in striving to achieve this goal. I am proud of the Sheriff's Office employees who have worked hard implementing the changes listed above.

Every day, Sheriff's Office deputies in the jail and patrol deputies in the community face challenging situations requiring decisions with serious outcomes.

I support our Sheriff's Office deputies as they perform their sworn duties to proudly serve the citizens of Deschutes," said Sheriff Nelson.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/5227/94709/Mays_Report.pdf
2016 ODVA Memorial Day Ceremony and Statewide Events
Oregon Deptartment of Veterans' Affairs - 05/24/16 4:10 PM
SALEM -- As part of the annual Memorial Day celebrations statewide, the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs (ODVA) will host a memorial ceremony on Monday, May 30, at 2 p.m., on the department's grounds in Salem, 700 Summer St. N.E.

A military flyover is scheduled to open the public ceremony at the Afghan-Iraqi Freedom Memorial where the names of 142 Oregonians killed while serving in Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom will be read aloud by cadets from the Oregon State University ROTC program. Special guest speaker Col. Kevin Dial will deliver the keynote address.

The ceremony will also be broadcast live on ODVA's public Facebook page (www.facebook.com/odvavet) beginning at 2:00 p.m. and available for replay thereafter.

Memorial Day, or Decoration Day as it was originally called, was first observed on May 30, 1868 as a day to place flowers on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery. The holiday's name was later changed to Memorial Day in 1971 and became a federal holiday to be observed on the last Monday in May.

The most current list of statewide community Memorial Day events is available online: www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/2016-Memorial-Day-Events.aspx.


###
OSP Seeks Public's Assistance with Road Rage Incident on I-205 - Clackamas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/24/16 11:25 AM
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A reported road rage incident occurred May 24, 2016 at 6:10 a.m., at I-205 southbound near Sunnyside Road and Oregon State Police (OSP) is seeking the public's assistance in identifying witness(s) of the incident.

The two vehicles involved were described as a navy blue, 2014 Ford F150 pickup and a tan or light gray, 1987 Toyota SR5 pickup. Any information about the vehicles, resulting traffic disruption, weapons seen or the actions of the men driving the trucks would be sought. Photos of similar vehicles are attached to this release.

Please contact Senior Trooper Jason Bledsoe at (503) 731-3020 x407 or email: jason.bledsoe@state.or.us


Attached Media Files: Photo1 , Photo2
OFB's Bushue: Listen to locals in Owyhee monument debate (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 05/24/16 10:13 AM
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One thing all parties could agree on at a May 23 hearing about the Owyhee Canyonlands is that it is spectacularly beautiful.

But who's to thank for that?

"Today we've heard the words 'iconic' and 'awesome' to describe the Owyhee Canyonlands," said Oregon Farm Bureau President Barry Bushue before the House Rural Communities Committee at the state capitol. "I say to you that this is exactly because of the people I'm here representing today, the ranchers, the farmers, the local communities, and the businesses that have worked 150 years to make this land what it is."

Bushue testified against a potential designation by President Obama to make the Owyhee Canyonlands a national monument. This designation would affect a 2.5 million-acre area in the Owyhee Canyonlands along the Oregon-Idaho-Nevada border, an area larger than the states of Delaware and Rhode Island combined. It would cover about 40% of Malheur County's total land base.

Bushue beseeched the lawmakers to listen to the people who actually live and work near the canyonlands, the families whose lives would be directly impacted by a monument designation. At a ballot in March, an incredible 90% of voters in Malheur County opposed a national monument. A designation by the president without a vote by Congress would completely disregard these rural voices.

"This is about the people on the ground, the people you represent," Bushue told lawmakers. "Give these people the credit they so richly deserve."

An executive action for a monument also does not require that its economic impact be determined. A monument would decimate Malheur County's historic cattle industry, an essential economic driver and job creator for the region. It would limit grazing, open ranchers up to litigation, and likely put out of business families who have worked the land for generations.

"To reduce economic opportunity on an area in a state that is so desperately in need of jobs and dollars is blatantly irresponsible," wrote Bushue in submitted testimony. "In addition, this comes at a time when much-needed timber payments from the federal government have been uncertain in recent years. Rural Oregon can hardly afford to have any more losses."

At the hearing, a monument supporter noted that sellers of outdoor gear would benefit from increased sales if a designation were made. But at what cost to the deeply rooted agricultural community?

"Are we going to support [outdoor recreation] businesses at the expense of fifth-generation ranchers like Elias Eiguren? I'm incredulous that there are those who would prioritize the value of these businesses over the people who have made the region what it is today," Bushue told the committee.

Not only is cattle ranching an integral part of the economy and local culture, it keeps the land productive and balanced. The Owyhee Canyonlands are ecologically sound today thanks to over a century of responsible use. Without the benefits of grazing and local management, the region would be subject to invasive species, noxious weeds, and risk of wildfire.

"Oregon is more than 60% publicly owned, either by the state or federal government. Much of the federal land in Oregon isn't maintained, causing great harm to existing farmland and crops," said Bushue.

"As farmers and ranchers, we care deeply about the land. Not only do we live on the land, we enjoy and depend on the land. We raise our families here and have cared for it responsibly for generations. Our voices are united and opposed to an unnecessary monument declaration that will harm our families, our community and our way of life," said Bushue.

Oregon Farm Bureau is a proud member of the Owyhee Basin Stewardship Coalition. Sign and share the petition here http://ourlandourvoice.com/ and learn more about how the monument would harm this rural community.

> See OFB President Barry Bushue's written testimony: http://bit.ly/1qHcKwH

> Attached photo of OFB President Barry Bushue testifying before the House Rural Communities Committee at the state capitol on May 23.

###

Note to Editors: "Farm Bureau" is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

The state's largest general farm organization, Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing the interests of the state's farmers and ranchers in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon in 1919, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties and has 7,000 member families that are professionally engaged in agriculture.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Barry Bushue is a third-generation farmer raising a variety of vegetables and berries at a nearly century-old farm near Boring, Oregon. He is OFB's 15th president.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/5507/94682/barry_bushue_testifying.jpg
Volunteers needed for Oregon State Parks Let's Go Camping program
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/24/16 8:49 AM
Do you love to go camping? Would you like to share your love of the outdoors with others? The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department is seeking experienced campers to help volunteer at our Let's Go Camping events this summer. Volunteers will have the opportunity to teach outdoor camping skills, serve as mentors to new campers and camp for free during the events.

Events are scheduled at campgrounds throughout the state on weekends from June through August. More information and a list of events are at www.oregonstateparks.org.

For more information or to sign up as a volunteer, please contact Bobbie Lucas at 503-986-0751 or bobbie.lucas@oregon.gov.
Mon. 05/23/16
Missing Person out of La Pine, Oregon
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/23/16 9:45 PM
MEDIA RELEASE

Missing Person out of La Pine, Oregon

Released by: Sgt. William Bailey

Occurred: May 16, 2016

Location: La Pine, Oregon

Missing Person : Jimmy Alen Robins 64 year old male
La Pine, Oregon


UPDATE May 23, 2016 at 2130

On May 23, 2016, the Deschutes County Sheriff's was notified by a citizen of northern Lake County that Robins' vehicle had been located on his property. Generally, the vehicle had been located on private property off Frederick Butte Road, between Brothers and Christmas Valley.

Jimmy Alen Robins was later found deceased a short distance away from his vehicle. The Lake County Sheriff's Office is currently investigating the circumstances surrounding Robins' death, but at this time his death does not appear to be suspicious in nature.

Detectives with the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office were also at the scene assisting with the investigation.



NARRATIVE:

On May 16, 2016, at approximately 0400 hours, Jimmy Alen Robins left his residence in the 15000 block of Camino De Oro Ave. in La Pine. He was driving his 1985 Ford F150 pickup truck with Oregon license plate 982BSK. The pickup was further described as having two doors (single cab)and being two toned in color, blue on the bottom and white on the top. The pickup also has a large white grille guard on the front.

Robins is described as being 5'07" and 135 lbs and having partially gray hair and blue eyes. He was last seen wearing a red and yellow plaid shirt, blue jeans, tennis shoes and a cowboy hat.

It was reported by friends and family that Robins could have left his residence for the areas of Wickiup Reservoir or the upper Deschutes River. The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office has started to check possible locations in this area without success.

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office is asking for the public's assistance in locating Jimmy Alen Robins and his vehicle. If the public has seen Jimmy or his vehicle, or has any information on his current whereabouts, you are asked to contact the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office through non-emergency dispatch at 541-693-6911.

A DMV photo of Jimmy has been attached to assist with locating him. No picture of his pickup is currently available.
***Update*** OSP Continuing Shooting Investigation - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 05/23/16 4:56 PM
On May 20, 2016 at approximately 7:10 p.m., Oregon State Police troopers and emergency personnel responded to 906 Old Salem Road in Albany after receiving a call reporting a person with a gunshot wound was at the location.

Troopers arrived and discovered an adult male who had been shot and appeared to have a non-life threatening wound. The injured person was medically treated at the scene and was later transported to an area hospital.

Oregon State Police Criminal Division detectives are continuing to investigate the incident. No arrests have been made however a vehicle possibly related to this incident was described as a red or orange in color Dodge Neon.

The Oregon State Police was assisted by members of the Linn County Sheriff's Office, Albany Police Department, Marion County Sheriff's Office, Albany Fire Department and the Linn County District Attorney's Office.

OSP is seeking the public's assistance if anyone has knowledge identifying the operator of the Dodge Neon. Anyone will information is asked to call the Oregon State Police Detective Ted Moisan at (971) 718-6546.
Former Captain Scott Beard pled guilty today
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/23/16 3:45 PM
Released by: Sheriff L. Shane Nelson
May 23, 2016



Former Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Captain Scott Beard pled guilty today in U.S District Court in Eugene to two counts of Theft, and two counts of Money Laundering arising from a series of crimes that occurred while he was employed at the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office.

Sentencing is scheduled for August 23, 2016. Prior to the sentencing, the U.S. Probation Services will prepare a pre-sentence report for the court listing the details of the crime, Beard's background, and the impact of the crimes.

Sheriff L. Shane Nelson and other Deschutes County Sheriff's Office staff are expected to make statements to the court at the August sentencing.

The statutory maximum sentence for these crimes is 60 years in prison and a statutory maximum fine of $1.2 million. The U.S. Attorney's Office will be requesting Beard be sentenced up to 5 years in prison and will also request that the court order Beard to pay restitution to Deschutes County and the citizens of Deschutes County.

Beard's crimes came to the attention of Sheriff's Command and business staff during the transition audit ordered when Sheriff L. Shane Nelson took office in July 2015.



In September 2015 an internal audit found discrepancies in accounting records in the audit of County funds intended as use in drug investigations. Beard was placed on administrative leave after the discovery of the discrepancies.

Sheriff Nelson contacted the FBI and U.S. Attorney's Office for assistance in investigating after the audit discovered the discrepancies. Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Command and business staff assisted FBI investigators in compiling and analyzing Deschutes County Sheriff's Office business records and determined that Beard committed a series of thefts spanning a period from approximately January 2014 to September 2015.

The investigation revealed that Beard forged signatures and fraudulently altered documents to make it appear that funds and evidence were properly accounted for and lied to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office and other law enforcement personnel to conceal his crimes. Beard stole money designated for use in drug investigations and stole money and property seized in drug investigations. The total of the thefts is approximately $205,747.

The United States Attorney's Office indicted Beard in February 2016 for two counts of Theft Concerning Program Receiving Federal Funds, two counts of Money Laundering, one count of Passport Fraud, and two forfeiture allegations.

The investigation indicates that no other Deschutes County Sheriff's Office staff acted with Beard in committing these crimes.

"Thank you to the FBI and U.S. Attorney's Office for their hard work and effort in investigating and prosecuting this case, and also my thanks to my Deschutes County Sheriff's Office co-workers whose diligence in the audit brought these crimes to the attention of the Command Staff at the Sheriff's Office," stated Sheriff Nelson.

Sheriff Nelson concluded saying, "I am assured that this change of plea is a step towards holding him accountable for violating the public's trust. I want to thank the citizens of Deschutes County for their on-going support."
***Update*** Fatal Crash on Highway 26 North of Banks - Washington County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/23/16 2:00 PM
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On May 23, 2016 at about 6:44 a.m., Oregon State Police (OSP) troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle crash on Highway 26 near milepost 49 (north of Banks).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2003 Chevrolet pickup was traveling westbound on Highway 26 when it crossed over the centerline for unknown reasons. The Chevrolet collided head-on with an eastbound 1993 Peterbilt commercial motor vehicle towing a trailer loaded with logs.

The driver of the Chevrolet, Bradley Cole VANDEHEY, age 20, of Hillsboro, was pronounced deceased on scene by emergency personnel. The driver of the truck, Raymond Michael SCOTT, age 32, of Tillamook, was injured and transported to OHSU where he was treated and released.

Contributing factors to the crash are still under investigation.

Highway 26 was closed for over six hours with an established detour. OSP was assisted by the Oregon Department of Transportation, Banks Fire Department and Washington County Sheriff's Office.

More information will be released when it is available.

End Release

Previous Release:

Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel are on scene of a two vehicle crash, on highway 26, north of Banks (milepost 49). There is one confirmed fatality.

This is a preliminary release, more information to follow pending family notifications.

The highway is closed at this time and please visit tripcheck.com for up-to-date road status.


Attached Media Files: Photo1 , Photo2
Prevent your campfire from turning into a wildfire
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/23/16 10:01 AM
Sitting around a campfire is one of the special times we all enjoy, but campfires are also a major cause of wildfires. May is Wildfire Awareness Month, and Keep Oregon Green, the Oregon State Fire Marshal, and the Oregon Department of Forestry urge Oregonians to follow these basic outdoor safety tips:

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO -- Call your local forestry or fire district to learn if there are any current campfire restrictions at your recreation destination. An interactive map of Oregon's fire restrictions is available at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/Pages/Restrictions.aspx Tom Fields, ODF's fire prevention coordinator, said the map continues to improve and is "an excellent tool for folks to use from home or from their mobile device."
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KICK THE CAMPFIRE HABIT THIS SUMMER -- Portable camp stoves are a safer option to campfires at any time of year. Areas that prohibit campfires outside maintained campgrounds with established fire pits often will allow the use of camp stoves.
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SELECT THE RIGHT SPOT -- Where campfires are allowed, avoid building the fire near your tent, structures, vehicles, shrubs or trees, and be aware of low-hanging branches overhead. Clear the site down to mineral soil, at least five feet on all sides, and circle your campfire with rocks. Store your unused firewood a good distance from the fire.
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KEEP YOUR CAMPFIRE SMALL -- A campfire is less likely to escape control if it is kept small. A large fire may cast hot embers long distances. Add firewood in small amounts as existing material is consumed.
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ATTEND YOUR CAMPFIRE AT ALL TIMES -- A campfire left unattended for only a few minutes can grow into a costly, damaging wildfire. Staying with your campfire from start to finish until dead out is required by state law, to ensure that any escaped sparks or embers can be extinguished quickly.
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NEVER USE GASOLINE or other accelerants (flammable or combustible liquids) to start or increase your campfire. Once the fire is ignited, wait until the match is cold and then discard it in the fire.
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ALWAYS HAVE WATER AND FIRE TOOLS on site -- Have a shovel and a bucket of water nearby to extinguish any escaped embers. When you are ready to leave, drown all embers with water, stir the coals with the shovel, and drown again. Repeat until the fire is DEAD out. If it is too hot to touch, it is too hot to leave.
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Burn ONLY wood -- State regulations prohibit the open burning of any material that creates dense, toxic smoke or noxious odors.
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ESCAPED CAMPFIRES can be costly -- State law requires the proper clearing, building, attending and extinguishing of open fires any time of year. A first-time citation carries a $110 fine. But by far the biggest potential cost of having your campfire spread out of control is liability for firefighting costs. You are responsible for the expenditures on fire suppression, which can range from a few hundred to thousands of dollars.

During Wildfire Awareness Month visit the Keep Oregon Green website, www.keeporegongreen.org for other wildfire prevention tips.
Sun. 05/22/16
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office Locates Remains of Mark Johnson, Jr. - Corrected spelling
FBI - Oregon - 05/22/16 12:38 PM
Note spelling correction for victim's name. Should read "Candelaria Rhoan"

nvestigators have found the remains of Mark Kevin Johnson, Jr., in Deschutes County. FBI agents and Warm Springs Police Officers were trying to locate Johnson as part of the investigation into the violent death of his wife, Candelaria Rhoan. Warm Springs officers who were doing a welfare check on Ms. Rhoan found her body inside her Warm Springs home in the early morning hours of Thursday, May 19th.

At approximately 3 pm on Saturday, May 21, 2016, Deschutes County Sheriff's deputies were dispatched to a vehicle over the cliff in the Deschutes River Canyon near Lower Bridge Way (Terrebonne, OR). Deputies arrived and determined a single male occupant of the vehicle was deceased. The vehicle was located more than 100 feet down the slope below a 50-foot sheer cliff. Sheriff's Detectives responded to the scene to investigate.

Due to the nature of the terrain, Deschutes County Search and Rescue was called out to recover the body. For safety reasons, that recovery was delayed until this morning. On Sunday, May 22nd, 21 Search and Rescue volunteers and two Special Services (SAR) deputies assisted investigators with recovering the body of the deceased. The recovery involved a ropes system to raise the body to the top of the canyon.

Deschutes County Sheriff's Detectives continue to investigate the vehicle incident in cooperation with other agencies, including the FBI, Warm Springs Police Department and the Jefferson County Sheriff's Office.

Both Johnson, Jr., 33, and Ms. Rhoan, age 30, were members of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs.
***Corrected Name*** Coos Bay Motorcyclist Killed In Highway 126 Crash - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/22/16 10:41 AM
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Corrected the name of the driver of the Lexus:

On May 21, 2016 at about 4:45PM OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a vehicle crash involving a motorcycle and passenger vehicle on Highway 126 near milepost 26 (7 miles west of Walton).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2006 Harley Davidson motorcycle was traveling eastbound on Highway 126 when it failed to negotiate a sweeping right curve. The motorcyclist crossed the centerline and into the path of a westbound 1992 Lexus sedan where a collision occurred. The motorcyclist was thrown from his motorcycle and landed on the highway. The motorcycle traveled off the roadway where it caught fire.

The motorcyclist, Khris M SACKET, age 59, of Coos Bay, was pronounced deceased on scene by emergency personnel. The driver of the Lexus, Toby Lee GRAY, age 45, of Florence, received minor injuries and was taken by ambulance to Peace Harbor Medical Center in Florence.

Highway 126 was closed for about an hour while the investigation was conducted. OSP was assisted by the Oregon Department of Transportation and Lane County Fire. More information will be released when it becomes available as this is an ongoing investigation.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1002/94646/IMG_1298.JPG
Sat. 05/21/16
OSP Continuing Shooting Investigation - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 05/21/16 7:52 AM
On May 20, 2016 at approximately 7:10 p.m., Oregon State Police troopers and emergency personnel responded to 906 Old Salem Road in Albany after receiving a call reporting a person with a gunshot wound was at the location.

Troopers arrived and discovered an adult male who had been shot and appeared to have a non-life threatening wound. The injured person was taken to an area hospital for treatment.

Oregon State Police Criminal Division detectives are continuing to investigate the incident. No arrests have been made. The Oregon State Police was assisted by members of the Linn County Sheriff's Office, Albany Police Department, Marion County Sheriff's Office, Albany Fire Department and the Linn County District Attorney's Office.

This is a preliminary release. More information will be released when it becomes available.
Man Killed In Single Vehicle Crash Near Wolf Creek - Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 05/21/16 7:45 AM
On May 20th at about 10:30PM, OSP responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Lower Wolf Creek Road in Josephine County.

Preliminary investigation revealed a 1985 Nissan pickup was traveling on Lower Wolf Creek Road when its operator, Corey Clifford Ray STEWARD, age 21 of Wolf Creek, lost control of the vehicle. The Nissan rolled four to five times before coming to rest on the south shoulder.

Wolf Creek Fire and Rescue and AMR responded to the scene and began medical treatment on STEWARD. Several people showed up at the scene and became confrontation to medical personnel prior to OSP arrival. All the subjects had left the area upon arrival of the Trooper.

While AMR was transporting STEWARD to the hospital, an unknown vehicle operating with its headlights off began to follow the ambulance. According to the ambulance crew, the vehicle began to harass the ambulance by tailgating and driving recklessly near it. As the original Trooper was on scene of the crash, OSP dispatched another Trooper to intercept the reckless driver. Prior to a Trooper being in position the suspicious vehicle turned around and the ambulance crews lost sight of it.

STEWARD was taken to Rouge Regional Medical Center where he died from his injuries. Alcohol is being considered a contributing factor to the crash. It was also learned STEWARD had a suspended Oregon driver's license. This is an ongoing investigation. More information will be released when it becomes available.
OSP Continuing Investigation After Triple Fatal Crash - Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/21/16 7:08 AM
2016-05/1002/94638/IMG_1446.JPG
2016-05/1002/94638/IMG_1446.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1002/94638/thumb_IMG_1446.JPG
On Friday May 20th at about 7:30PM, a head-on crash occurred on O'Brien Road in Josephine County.

Preliminary information revealed a 1997 Subaru Legacy was eastbound on O'Brien Road from Highway 199 lost control on a corner and crossed the centerline (near Waldo Road). The Subaru struck an westbound Mazda Protégé head-on.

The driver of the Subaru, Tommy E DODSON, age 69, of Cave Junction was pronounced deceased at the scene. The driver of the Mazda, Michael T KENNEDY, age 62 and his passenger Tammy L BLIND, age 51 (both of O'Brien) were both pronounced deceased on scene. A dog in the Mazda was also killed.

Speed and alcohol consumption are being considered a contributing factor in the crash. Additionally it was discovered DODSON had a suspended Oregon driver's license. The roadway was closed for about 3 hours as the Troopers from the Grants Pass Office conducted their investigation. OSP was assisted by Illinois Valley Fire. This is a preliminary release. More information will be released when it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1002/94638/IMG_1446.JPG
Fri. 05/20/16
Lou Savage to lead Oregon Workers' Compensation Division
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 05/20/16 1:42 PM
(Salem) -- Lou Savage is the new administrator for the Workers' Compensation Division, Department of Consumer and Business Services Director Patrick Allen announced today.

Savage replaces long-time administrator John Shilts, who retired in December 2015.

The division oversees the workers' compensation system, to ensure injured workers receive the benefits they need to recover while keeping costs low for employers.

Savage recently returned to Oregon after spending two and a half years providing consulting and training on law reform issues to attorneys in North Africa and the Middle East. A member of the Oregon State Bar, he has spent his career working on consumer and business issues in the nonprofit, private, and public sectors. He served as Oregon insurance commissioner from 2012 to 2013 and directed DCBS' legislative activity as senior policy advisor from 2003 to 2012. Before joining the state, Savage served as director of Multnomah County Legal Aid and state director for Oregon Congressman Ron Wyden's office. He also spent 10 years in private law practice.

"We are thrilled to have Lou back at DCBS in this important role," Allen said. "His depth of experience in worker and business issues and strong ability to bring people together and build consensus will help our workers' compensation system continue its history of success and innovation."

Oregon employers pay, on average, the eighth lowest workers' compensation premium rates in the nation. Rates have stayed low while the average benefits paid to or on behalf of workers have increased.

Savage has a law degree from Lewis & Clark College and a bachelor's degree from the University of Oregon.

"I am looking forward to working closely with workers, businesses, and other stakeholders to build on Oregon's workers' compensation success story and address the emerging needs of Oregon's changing workplaces," Savage said.

Savage's appointment is effective immediately. He has been serving as acting administrator since January.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit dcbs.oregon.gov.
VA Veterans Town Hall & Claims Clinic - 26 May in Portland and at 6 clinics (Photo)
VA Portland Health Care System (VAPORHCS) - 05/20/16 1:41 PM
VAPORHCS Logo
VAPORHCS Logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/628/94630/thumb_Excellence_JPG_Small_VAPORHCS_logo.jpg
Veterans, family members, interested community members, and members of the media are invited to join Portland area VA leaders and staff for a VETERANS TOWN HALL and Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) Claims Clinic on Thursday, May 26, at the Portland VA Medical Center auditorium. The address is 3710 SW U.S. Veterans Hospital Rd., Portland, OR 97239 on the 2nd floor in building 100.

A Claims Clinic starts at 4 p.m. with both VBA and VA Portland Health Care System (VAPORHCS) staff who can answer specific Veteran questions and address issues about benefits or health care. The Veterans Town Hall runs from 5 -- 6:30 p.m. and is co-hosted by VAPORHCS & VBA Portland Regional Office Directors.

Veterans can also attend the 5 p.m. VETERANS TOWN HALL by video teleconference at the Bend, Salem, N. Coast, West Linn, Hillsboro, The Dalles CBOCs. The clinic locations can be found on the VAPORHCS Web site at http://www.portland.va.gov/locations/index.asp.

Contact the Public Affairs Office with any questions at (503) 402-2975 or by email at VHAPOR-PublicAffairs@med.va.gov


Attached Media Files: VAPORHCS Logo , VA Town Hall
Monitoring shows metals above air quality targets near Precision Castparts
Oregon Health Authority - 05/20/16 12:04 PM
EDITORS: Brian Boling, DEQ laboratory program manager, and David Farrer, OHA toxicologist, are available today between 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. to discuss air monitoring results. Contact their agencies' communications staffers to set up an interview.

May 20, 2016

Media contacts:
Jennifer Flynt, DEQ, 503-730-5924, flynt.jennifer@deq.state.or.us
Jonathan Modie, OHA, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Monitoring shows metals above air quality targets near Precision Castparts
Agencies find nickel, hexavalent chromium, arsenic above health-based goals

The first set of data from an air monitor placed near industrial manufacturer Precision Castparts Corp. in southeast Portland show levels of heavy metals nickel, hexavalent chromium and arsenic above health-protective air quality goals.

The data is the first of 35-day monitoring results from one of three monitors the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality set up at Southeast 45th Avenue and Southeast Harney Drive, just northwest of Precision Castparts. The data show arsenic levels were more than four times above the health-based target--ambient benchmark concentration--for the metal, although still within what's found in urban environments (urban background) for the area, while nickel was almost two times above target, and hexavalent chromium was just over one time above target.

Though the levels of the metals are above health-based target concentrations, they are below Oregon 24-hour screening levels, so there is no indication of an immediate public health threat, according to a toxicologist at the Oregon Health Authority. They also do not indicate the need for any special precautions on the part of residents in the area.

Oregon 24-hour screening levels, short-term concentrations below which immediate health effects are not expected to occur, are 200 ng/m3 for nickel, 36 ng/m3 for arsenic and 36 ng/m3 for hexavalent chromium. Comparison values for metals in air are at: http://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/TrackingAssessment/EnvironmentalHealthAssessment/Documents/metals/comparison-values-metals-in-air.pdf.

The following table link lists the 35-day average concentrations compared with what's expected in urban environments (urban background), and the health-based target (ambient benchmark); data are listed in nanograms per cubic meter, or ng/m3:

Table: http://1.usa.gov/1U5t15R

The company has informed DEQ that as of May 16 it has installed additional pollution control devices, including four HEPA filters and one baghouse. These supplement the existing 32 baghouses and two HEPA filters. The data being reported today is for between March 30 and May 4.

The data from two additional monitors placed near Precision Castparts will be available in mid-June. Air monitoring is continuing daily, and the devices are operated 24 hours a day. Data that is complete will continue to be released as it is available.

An interagency group that includes DEQ and Oregon Health Authority is releasing today's data as part of the Cleaner Air Oregon initiative to align industrial air toxics regulations with human health. More information about Cleaner Air Oregon can be found at http://CleanerAir.Oregon.gov.
Agencies Release Study of 'West-Wide' Energy Corridors
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 05/20/16 11:48 AM
WASHINGTON -- The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) today released a study that provides a foundation for upcoming regional reviews of energy corridors on western public lands to assess the need for revisions and provide greater public input regarding areas that may be well suited for transmission siting. The regional reviews will begin with priority corridors in southern California, southern Nevada and western Arizona, and provide more opportunities for collaboration with the public and Federal, Tribal, state and local governmental stakeholders.

The study examines whether the energy corridors established under Section 368(a) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 are achieving their purpose to promote environmentally responsible corridor-siting decisions and to reduce the proliferation of dispersed rights-of-way crossing Federal lands. With the aim of encouraging more efficient and effective use of the corridors, the study establishes baseline data and presents opportunities and challenges for further consideration during the periodic regional reviews that BLM and USFS will conduct.

The corridors address a national concern by fostering long-term, systematic planning for energy transport development in the West; providing industry with a coordinated and consistent interagency permitting process; and establishing practicable measures to avoid or minimize environmental harm from future development within the corridors. Section 368(a) directed several federal agencies to designate corridors on federal lands in the 11 contiguous western states to provide linear pathways for siting oil, gas and hydrogen pipelines and high voltage transmission and distribution facilities. The contiguous states are Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

The BLM, USFS, and DOE, among others, undertook an unprecedented landscape scale effort, including a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, starting in 2006 and completed in 2009, that designated nearly 6,000 miles of corridors, issuing two Records of Decisions and associated land use plan amendments

As required by a 2012 Settlement Agreement that resolved litigation about the corridors identified, the BLM, USFS and DOE established an interagency Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to explain how the agencies will review the Section 368 (a) corridors on a regional basis. The MOU, signed in June 2013, describes the interagency process for conducting the reviews, the types of information and data to be considered, and the process for incorporating resulting recommendations in BLM and USFS land use plans.

The full-text of the corridor study is available online at:
http://corridoreis.anl.gov

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's mission is to manage and conserve the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations under our mandate of multiple-use and sustained yield. In Fiscal Year 2015, the BLM generated $4.1 billion in receipts from activities occurring on public lands.


Attached Media Files: Agencies Release Study of ‘West-Wide’ Energy Corridors
DPSST Fire Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Oregon Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/20/16 10:43 AM
OREGON DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY
STANDARDS AND TRAINING
4190 Aumsville Hwy SE
Salem, OR 97317
Contact: Kristina Follis Mwepu
(503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting
The Fire Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting on, May 25, 2016 at 9:00 a.m. in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910
If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group. Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.


Agenda Items:
1. Minutes
Approve August 26, 2015 meeting minutes

2. OAR 259-009-0087- Proposed Rule: Accreditation of Fire Service Agency Training Programs
Presented by Julie Olsen-Fink

3. Draft R-1 Form
Presented by Julie Olsen-Fink

4. OAR 259-009-0070- Proposed Rule Change: Updates rule language to provide clarification
Presented by Jennifer Howald

5. OAR 259-009-0010, 259-009-0059, 259-009-0062- Proposed Rule Change: Personnel/Agency Form
Presented by Jennifer Howald

6. Colby McCormick #F08057- Fire Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

7. Jamus Quintana #F28458- NFPA Fire Fighter I Certification, Eligibility Determination
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

8. Robert Norris #F25799- NFPA Fire Fighter 1, Fire Fighter Type 2, and NFPA Apparatus
Drive/Operator Certifications, Eligibility Determination
Presented by Kristen Hibberds



9. Aaron Bentley #F22508- NFPA Driver and NFPA Fire Fighter 1
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

10. Mark James Burns- Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial Wall Nomination
Presented by Eriks Gabliks

11. Next scheduled FPC meeting -- August 24, 2016 at 9:00 a.m.
County advisory group to state forestry will meet May 26, testimony for Board of Forestry on agenda
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/20/16 9:04 AM
A group of county commissioners representing Oregon counties where state forestlands are located will meet May 26 in Salem.

Items on the Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee agenda include an overview of the agenda for the June 8, 2016 Board of Forestry meeting and discussion on drafting testimony related to proposed policy option packages and a Gilchrist State Forest land exchange proposal.

Commissioners will meet via conference call from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. and members of the public can attend in person in the Santiam Room, Building D at the Oregon Department of Forestry campus, 2600 State St., in Salem. An opportunity for public comment will be provided and recorded audio will be available following the meeting.

The FTLAC is a legally mandated committee of county commissioners representing counties that deeded lands to the state. The committee advises the Board of Forestry on matters in which counties may have a role related to forestland managed by ODF. This collaborative relationship between county governments and ODF has existed since 1986.

The FTLAC is made up of seven members representing the 15 counties that have state forestland within their county boundaries. The counties include: Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Douglas, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk, Tillamook and Washington.

Learn more about the FTLAC and ongoing collaboration facilitated by the state:
http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/FTLAC.aspx

Learn more about ODF's $54.9 million annual contribution in 2015 to county governments and other state forest management accomplishments:
http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Documents/WorkingForests/2015CFTLCAnnualReport.pdf

###
Thu. 05/19/16
Verdict Rendered in the 2014 Shooting of a Klamath County Deputy
Oregon State Police - 05/19/16 4:45 PM
On August 27, 2014, Klamath County Sheriff's Deputy Jason Weber was shot multiple times while conducting a traffic stop in Klamath Falls. The Klamath County Major Crime Team was activated to investigate the shooting. The following day, William Jack PARKERSON, age 31, from Klamath Falls, was taken into custody for shooting Deputy Weber.

The trial began on May 10, 2016 and concluded on May 18, 2016. The jury deliberated for approximately 30 minutes before returning with a guilty verdict. PARKERSON was convicted of Attempted Aggravated Murder and Assault 1.

###
Commercial Truck Driver Arrested for DUII on Interstate 5 near French Prairie Rest Area - Clackamas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/19/16 2:55 PM
Photo2
Photo2
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Oregon State Police (OSP) arrested Stephen Augustus ROHAN, age 35, from Salem, who was operating a set of doubles (commercial motor vehicle) for Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants (DUII) and other traffic-related offenses following an early Tuesday morning citizen's reported driving complaint.

Preliminary information indicates that on May 17th, 2016, at 5:40 a.m., OSP Northern Command Center Dispatch was notified of a driving complaint about a commercial truck pulling a set of doubles, traveling southbound on Interstate 205 near milepost 7, of failing to drive within a single lane and varying its speed. OSP troopers located the semi and stopped the vehicle on Interstate 5, near milepost 285 southbound (French Prairie Rest Area) and identified the driver as ROHAN.

Subsequent investigation led to ROHAN's arrest and citation for DUII-Controlled Substances, Reckless Driving, Reckless Endangering, Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) driver in possession of a controlled substance (PCS), CMV driver in possession of alcohol and he was lodged at the Clackamas County Correctional Facility.

Suspected controlled substances were seized and PCS charges are pending crime lab results.

###


Attached Media Files: Photo2 , Photo1
Warm Springs Woman Deceased; FBI and Warm Springs Police Searching for Her Husband (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 05/19/16 2:05 PM
Mark Kevin Johnson, Jr.
Mark Kevin Johnson, Jr.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/3585/94588/thumb_Johnson_Jr._Mark_Kevin.jpg
-- Correction: Height should read 5'8"

Warm Springs Police Department officers who were conducting a welfare check found the body of Candelaria Rhoan, age 30, inside her home in the early morning hours of Thursday, May 19, 2016. Although the autopsy is pending, responding officers believe Ms. Rhoan (pronounced "Roan") died violently.

Warm Springs officers and FBI agents are now attempting to locate her husband, Mark Kevin Johnson, Jr., age 33. Johnson, Jr., was last seen at a friend's home on the Warm Springs Reservation at about 2 pm on Wednesday, May 18th. He is likely driving a 1998 maroon, 4-door Volkswagen Passat with an Oregon license plate of 223DXW. Johnson, Jr. may be suicidal, and he should be considered armed and dangerous.

Johnson, Jr., is:
Height: 5'8"
Weight: 190 pounds
Hair: Black
Eyes: Brown

The FBI's Evidence Response Team is responding to assist in the search of the home, and agents and officers from the FBI's Bend office and Warm Springs Police Department are investigating.

Anyone who has information about Johnson, Jr.'s whereabouts is asked to call 911. Those with general information about this investigation or the death of Ms. Rhoan should call the Warm Springs Police Department at (541) 553-1171 or the FBI at (541) 389-1202.

Both Ms. Rhoan and Johnson, Jr., are members of the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation.


Attached Media Files: Mark Kevin Johnson, Jr.
Insight school of Oregon - Painted Hills | Board of Directors Meeting
Insight School of Ore. - Painted Hills - 05/19/16 12:30 PM
Reminder: The ISOR-PH board will hold a regular meeting on May 26th at 4:00 PM.

Insight School of Oregon Painted Hills Board Members are hereby notified that the Meeting of the Board will be held at:

1.Via Teleconference:
Conference Call Number: 1-888-824-5783
Conference Code Number: 54433245# - Note this is a new pass code.

And

2.Via Web Conference
http://tinyurl.com/ISORPH-SchoolBoardMeeting

The Public has been invited to the Board Meeting with notices posted at the following locations:

A.FlashNet Newswire
http://flashalertbend.net/press-releases.html

B.Insight School of Oregon Painted Hills Office
603 NW 3rd Street
Prineville, OR 97754
Cascadia Rising Earthquake and Tsunami Response Exercise Scheduled for June 7-10 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 05/19/16 8:45 AM
2016-05/3986/94577/5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.png
2016-05/3986/94577/5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/3986/94577/thumb_5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.png
Recently, much media attention has focused on the Cascadia Subduction Zone, an area off the Pacific Coast that threatens to deliver the most destructive earthquake and tsunami in North American history. While the topic has recently gained interest from the public and media, state and federal partners have been working with city, county and tribal emergency management entities to plan for this real eventuality, and working for many years to hone response plans and to ensure emergency response partners are in sync to save lives and property when the "big one" hits.

Much of this planning will be put to the test over four days, June 7-10, when Cascadia Rising, a region-wide functional exercise, is conducted. It's called a functional exercise because it tests specific functions and capabilities emergency management agencies have in place to respond to such an event.

As an emergency preparedness exercise that encompasses all aspects of emergency response, the exercise brings together multiple states (Oregon, Washington, Idaho), and FEMA to prepare for a mega 8.0-9.0+ earthquake. Major Oregon cities, 23 counties, nine tribal nations, 17 state agencies and departments, the American Red Cross, and two private sector partner organizations have signed on to participate.

Emergency Operations and Coordination Centers (EOC/ECCs) at all levels of government will activate to coordinate simulated field response operations within their jurisdictions and with neighboring communities, state EOCs/ECCs, FEMA and a variety of military resources.

"Cascadia Rising will assess plans, processes, and our ability to communicate and coordinate to help to ensure that our emergency response partners across the region are working effectively and efficiently to protect lives, property and the environment during a catastrophic disaster," says Andrew Phelps, OEM director. "Specifically, it's an opportunity to provide decision makers with information to implement programs and policies that allocate and manage resources efficiently with urgency during a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake and tsunami, and other disasters."

Although Cascadia Rising is not geared toward public participation, Phelps notes that Cascadia Rising provides an opportunity to show the public that government agencies are diligently working to be prepared for emergencies. Phelps said this is fundamental to public safety and community resilience.

The public may be kept abreast of Cascadia Rising activities through social and traditional media, including a Cascadia Rising kickoff Twitter chat on June 6 using hashtags #CascadiaRising, #CascadiaEQ.

"Cascadia Rising is a perfect time for everyone to evaluate their family emergency plan and update or establish emergency kits," added Phelps. "Remind yourself and family members of established exit routes, contacts, meeting places and other components of your emergency plan that will be important after a disaster."


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/3986/94577/5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.png , 2016-05/3986/94577/map_cascadia_subduction_zone_v1.png
Eight western states proclaim May Wildfire Awareness Month
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/19/16 8:17 AM
The governors of eight western states have signed a proclamation recognizing May 2016 as Wildfire Awareness Month. The chief executives of Oregon, Washington, Nevada, California, Idaho, Utah, Montana and South Dakota encourage all citizens to "take steps to better prepare their home and communities for wildfires and work toward becoming a fire-adapted community."

These states, in partnership with fire prevention agencies and organizations, are working together to increase awareness of wildfires. This year's wildfire season is predicted to pose a substantial threat across Oregon. Gov. Kate Brown's office, along with the Keep Oregon Green Association, the Oregon Department of Forestry, and the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal, is seeking the public's assistance to help prevent human-caused wildfires this summer.

Gov. Brown has produced two public service announcements explaining how every Oregonian can take steps to keep our state safe over the summer.

View the PSAs at these links:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPrDy5MyAAs
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AG_i0GxNqd0

OREGON'S BACK-TO-BACK FIRE SEASONS AND CURRENT WILDFIRE RISK
In Oregon, approximately 70 percent of all wildland fires are human-caused. 2013 was an epic wildfire year in terms of state-protected acreage burned (103,809) and suppression costs ($122 million). 2014 was another endless season of fire, with 712 human-caused fires burning nearly six times the 10-year average acreage (20,052). The high cost prompted a substantial change to Oregon's wildland fire insurance policy, doubling the annual deductible to $50 million and nearly doubling the premium to $3.75 million. Adding insult to injury, Oregon faced another record-breaking fire season in 2015 with record low snowpack, the driest conditions in 25 years, more than 800 human-caused fires, and $76.5 million spent on suppression.

During May, Keep Oregon Green along with federal, state, tribal and local fire agencies, will continue to promote wildfire prevention topics via traditional and social media each week to help homeowners and recreationists learn how to ensure their outdoor activities do not spark the next wildfire. For more information, visit these websites: Keep Oregon Green, www.keeporegongreen.org; Oregon Dept. of Forestry, www.oregon.gov/odf; Office of the State Fire Marshal, www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/pages/index.aspx

Follow Oregon wildfire news and prevention updates on social media: Twitter @keeporegongreen, @ORDeptForestry and Facebook https://www.facebook.com/keeporegongreen; https://www.facebook.com/odfprevention/?fref=ts
Wed. 05/18/16
Patrol Lieutenant on Administrative Leave
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/18/16 3:53 PM
From: Sheriff L. Shane Nelson

Yesterday, I placed Lt. Tim Leak on paid administrative leave for allegations of violating Sheriff's Office policies. The alleged policy violations are not criminal in nature. Because our investigation into this matter is ongoing, I am limited in what I can share.

I became aware of these alleged policy violations as a result of the ongoing administrative investigation by Captain John Bocciolatt. Lt. Leak was placed on leave after new information came to the attention of Command Staff in the last week.

As your Sheriff, if there is an issue within this organization, I will take care of business.

We have faced challenging issues and, in response, we have added layers of oversight to help us identify, investigate and address issues within the Sheriff's Office.

Right now, we are continuing to work through a period of change. We remain committed to doing the right thing and to being as transparent as possible with the citizens we serve.
Advisory: National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors to host Republican Gubernatorial Candidates from both Oregon and Washington at State Convention
VanNatta Public Relations - 05/18/16 3:34 PM
What: The National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors (NAIFA) Oregon and Washington State Convention.

Who: Salem, Oregon oncologist and Oregon Republican gubernatorial candidate, Bud Pierce, Ph.D., M.D will join Washington Republican gubernatorial candidate Bill Bryant in a panel discussion. (Note: Washington Governor Inslee and Oregon Governor Brown declined invitations to attend).

When: Sunday, May 22, 10 a.m.

Where: Skamania Lodge, Stevenson Ballroom, 1131 SW Skamania Lodge Way, Stevenson, WA 98648

Format: Candidates will share vision for their state and discuss issues of interest to the NAIFA membership.

Visuals:Two Republican candidates, Dr. Bud Pierce and Bill Bryant, will appear together on a panel. Pictures and biographies can be found at http://naifaoregon.org/Speaker-Information.

About NAIFA: Founded in 1890 as The National Association of Life Underwriters (NALU), NAIFA is one of the nation's largest associations representing the interests of insurance professionals from every Congressional district in the United States. NAIFA members assist consumers by focusing their practices on one or more of the following: life insurance and annuities, health insurance and employee benefits, multiline, and financial advising and investments. NAIFA's mission is to advocate for a positive legislative and regulatory environment, enhance business and professional skills, and promote the ethical conduct of its members.
Most bond elections pass as schools seek state matches
Ore. School Boards Assn. - 05/18/16 2:14 PM
Thirteen of 22 Oregon school districts passed local bond measures Tuesday in the largest such field since 2008.

Last November, no local districts sought bonds, as they were waiting until this election to take advantage of new matching funds available under the Oregon School Capital Improvement Matching (OSCIM) program.

The 2015 Legislature authorized $125 million in state matching bonds to provide incentives to local school districts seeking approval of capital projects. Seven districts that were approved for the initial matching grants passed their bonds Tuesday: Nyssa, Echo, Adrian, Milton-Freewater, Mapleton, Athena-Weston and Yamhill Carlton.

Among OSBA's legislative priorities in 2015 was finding a statewide solution to pay for school construction and renovation. The resulting legislation created OSCIM.

Betsy Miller-Jones, executive director of the Oregon School Boards Association (OSBA), said she was pleased to see local voters approve bond proposals.

"That is what we had hoped for in asking the state to created added incentives for communities to invest in their schools," she said.

Among two community college bond elections, one (Rogue CC) passed and the other (Mount Hood CC) did not.

A full listing of the election results can be found at http://www.osba.org/Resources/Article/Budget_and_Finance/Election-Recent_Bond-Local_Option_Election_Results.aspx?d=5/17/2016

OSBA is a member services agency for more than 200 locally elected boards serving school districts, education service districts and community colleges. It also provides services to charter schools and their boards.
***Update - Fourth Occupant Dies from Injures*** Highway 97 Crash Takes Three Lives South Of Madras - Jefferson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/18/16 12:34 PM
2016-05/1002/94527/overall_scene.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1002/94527/thumb_overall_scene.jpg
OSP learned today that the 10 year old male passenger succumbed to his injuries while being treated at Saint Charles in Bend.

No further information is available for release at this time.

End Update

Previous Release:

On May 17, 2016 at about 2:09PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a multiple vehicle crash on Highway 97 near milepost 100 (intersection of Bear Lane, south of Madras).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2003 Pontiac van was traveling northbound on Highway 97 when it stopped in the lane of travel in preparation to make a left turn onto Bear Lane (waiting for southbound traffic to pass).

While waiting to make a left turn, an unknown vehicle that had also been traveling northbound on Highway 97 almost rear-ended the Pontiac but passed it on the right shoulder. Another northbound vehicle, a 2015 Ford van, could not avoid the Pontiac and rear-ended it at highway speeds. This impact forced the Pontiac into the southbound lane of travel where it collided with a southbound 2008 Honda Accord.

The driver of the Pontiac, Anita J BEMROSE, age 49, of Madras was taken by air ambulance to Saint Charles Bend where she died from her injuries. A 10 year old male passenger was also taken to Saint Charles Bend for life threatening injuries. Two other passengers, a 12 year old male and 14 year old male, were pronounced deceased on scene. All passengers were sons to the deceased driver.

The driver of the Honda, Shirley AYRES, age 69, of Madras was transported to Saint Charles Madras for non-life threatening injuries. The driver of the Ford, Bryan MCDONALD, age 41, of Redmond, was taken to Saint Charles Redmond for non-life threatening injuries.

OSP is seeking the public's assistance if anyone has knowledge identifying the operator of the unknown vehicle who nearly collided with the stopped Pontiac. Anyone will information is asked to call the Oregon State Police at 503-375-3555.

This is a preliminary release. More information will be released when it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1002/94527/overall_scene.jpg , 2016-05/1002/94527/Bear_Lane_Honda_Accord.jpg , 2016-05/1002/94527/Bear_Lane_Ford_Van.jpg , 2016-05/1002/94527/Bear_Lane__Pontiac_van.jpg
Oregon Hospitals Offer Cost Estimates Within Three Days
Oregon Assn. of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 05/18/16 10:35 AM
Today, the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems announced that every Oregon hospital can provide a cost estimate for hospital services for a scheduled procedure within three business days. This voluntary policy helps uninsured or out-of-network patients to understand their potential costs for services provided at the hospital. Most insured patients, however, will find more useful information on costs by contacting their insurer, who can provide specific estimates based on their particular plan.

To facilitate access to this information, OAHHS also announced that the OregonHospitalGuide.org website now features a "Cost Estimates" section for each hospital in the state. This new section provides comprehensive information for consumers to contact hospital cost estimate and billing departments. It also links directly to each hospital's financial assistance policy, which can be helpful for people who need help paying their bill.

"Patients, whether they are insured, out of their health plan's network or lack insurance all together, should be able to get a good faith estimate directly from their hospital for the cost of a procedure ahead of time. And, when coupled with the corresponding commitment of Oregon's health plans to provide costs estimates for the vast majority of our state's residents who are now insured, every Oregonian, whether insured, uninsured or out-of network can get the financial information they need to make better healthcare decisions for themselves and their families," said Andy Davidson, OAHHS President and CEO. "We are very proud of this pro-consumer commitment by Oregon hospitals."

"We commend OAHHS and its member hospitals for their accomplishments and for their commitment to improving price transparency," said Healthcare Financial Management Association President and CEO Joseph J. Fifer, FHFMA, CPA. "Oregon is among the first hospital associations in the nation to adopt the recommendations in the HFMA Price Transparency Task Force Report, which reflect the industry consensus on price and quality transparency."

This pro-consumer initiative is part of a larger transparency effort designed and led by OAHHS and complements the comparable hospital quality data already available on OregonHospitalGuide.org website. In addition to this new information, the website, which launched in March of 2015, also provides searchable, comparable hospital financial and utilization data for every hospital in the state, as well as quality of care data -- all of which patients can use to learn about their local community hospital.

Key data features on OregonHospitalGuide.org:
-- Contact information and direct links to hospital billing and financial assistance policies
-- Searchable quality of care data reported to the federal government
-- Key indicators in graph form for individual hospitals including operating margins, payer mix, and uncompensated care in percentage and dollars
-- Key indicators for comparing one or more hospitals including:
-- Average length of stay, average daily census, occupancy rate, surgery mix, and FTEs per adjusted occupied bed
-- Charity care as a percentage of total charges, total uncompensated care as a percentage of total charges, collected charges as a percent of total charges, operating margin, and total margin

At the time of launching the site, OAHHS reminded patients that despite all the comparisons and research that this site enables, the best way to make informed health care decisions was still in consultation with their medical professional team.

To learn more, visit OregonHospitalGuide.org.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1635/94540/ORHospitalGuide-cost-estimates.pdf
DOJ Settlement Highlights Importance of Understanding Facts about 9-1-1 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 05/18/16 8:28 AM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/3986/94532/thumb_5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.png
The Oregon Department of Justice recently reached a settlement with "Alert911," a dba of ConnectAmerica.com, which sells a device that can contact 9-1-1 during an emergency. While doing business in Oregon, the company misrepresented to Oregonians that the device would call an operator, who would monitor the call and dispatch emergency personnel from the correct 9-1-1 center, based on the customer's location. In reality, the device made a direct connection to the closest 9-1-1 center, which was neither intercepted nor monitored by an Alert911 operator, and the non-initialized device did not provide a location or a call-back number if the 9-1-1 call got disconnected.

As part of the settlement, the company must refrain from making any false representations in Oregon, and must correct all website content, print advertisements and phone solicitations to remove claims that the company monitors calls, provides an operator for calls, and dispatches local emergency medical services for its Alert911 device subscribers. All customers in Oregon who purchased the device and paid the monthly fee will be reimbursed, under the settlement.

"The device provided by this company to its subscribers was a wireless non-initialized device," said Mark Tennyson, the state 9-1-1 program manager for Oregon Office of Emergency Management. "This device is capable of contacting 9-1-1 but may not reach the appropriate 9-1-1 center for assistance. The Federal Communications Commission requires any wireless device to be able to reach a 9-1-1 center, but use of a non-initialized wireless device is not the recommended way to contact 9-1-1," Tennyson said.

He added that the device does not provide a call back number, and that if the 9-1-1 call gets disconnected, the 9-1-1 center would be unable to call back the caller to gain additional information. Furthermore, the device would not be able to provide location information for the 9-1-1 caller.

Due to the critical life safety services that 9-1-1 provides, it is important to be aware of the following:

Without a call back number and accurate location information, 9-1-1 call centers cannot efficiently provide the most helpful emergency services when needed.
The best way to contact 9-1-1 emergency services is by calling 9-1-1 directly, speaking with a dispatcher, and providing your location information.
Consumers should be aware of exactly what products and services they are purchasing and the abilities and limitations of those products and services, especially as it relates to 9-1-1.

"9-1-1 plays an extremely important role keeping citizens safe, and that's why everyone should be aware of the most efficient way they can contact 9-1-1," Tennyson explained.



PHOTO CAPTION:

20160329_153104
A 9-1-1 dispatcher takes a call in Jackson County, Ore. (Photo courtesy of Emergency Communications of Southern Oregon in Jackson County)


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/3986/94532/5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.png , 2016-05/3986/94532/20160329_153104.jpg
Hospital Performance Metrics Advisory Committee to meet May 20
Oregon Health Authority - 05/18/16 8:27 AM
May 18, 2016

Contact: Pamela Naylor, 503-559-2216 (meeting information and accommodations)

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority Hospital Performance Metrics Advisory Committee. Public testimony will be heard at 2:30 p.m.

When: Friday, May 20, 1-3:30 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room #210, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville

Attendees also can join through a listen-only conference line at 1-877-848-7030, participant code 695-684.

Agenda: Welcome and consent agenda; presentation: Healthy Families Oregon; public testimony; opioids measurement; wrap up, adjourn.

For more information, an agenda and hospital metrics meeting packet, visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/analytics/Pages/Hospital-Performance-Metrics.aspx.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. To request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations call the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet May 20 in Wilsonville
Oregon Health Authority - 05/18/16 8:24 AM
May 18, 2016

Contact: Pamela Naylor, 503-559-2216 (meeting information or accommodations)

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority Metrics and Scoring Committee. Public testimony will be heard at 11:40 a.m.

When: Friday, May 20, 9 a.m. to noon

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room #210, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville

Attendees also can join through a listen-only conference line at 1-888-204-5984, participant code 1277166.

Agenda: Welcome and consent agenda; disparity measurement discussion; stakeholder survey results and proposed new measures; public testimony; wrap up, adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at www.oregon.gov/oha/analytics/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx .

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. To request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations call the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Tue. 05/17/16
Memorial Day weekend marks reopening of Corps' Philippi Park (Photo)
US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District - 05/17/16 4:13 PM
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Partnership provides path to annual summer recreation on John Day River

Release No: 16-021
For Immediate Release:
May 17, 2016

PORTLAND, OREGON -- Philippi Park, a long-time favorite recreation area on the John Day River about 3 miles southeast of John Day Lock and Dam, will reopen to yearly summer use on May 27, 2016.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Portland District, through a new, long-term partnership with OPAL Foundation, will turn on the power and water systems, install boat docks, open the restroom/shower building and return the park to public use through the 2016 Labor Day weekend. The Corps closed the park prior to summer 2013 due to recreation budget reductions.

The park reopening will start with a boat parade from LePage Park to Philippi Park at 9 a.m., Friday, May 27, followed by a ribbon cutting ceremony at 10 a.m. The public is welcome to tour the park and enjoy a beach-side BBQ hosted by OPAL Foundation.

"Through positive collaboration with OPAL Foundation, we worked through details to improve and operate this popular destination park," said Kevin Moynahan, John Day-Willow Creek operations project manager. "Together we now can support sustainable recreation each summer for local communities and recreating visitors."

"We are excited to be part of opening the park to new generations of visitors," said Darrell McSmith of Beaverton, Oregon, and founder of OPAL Foundation. "The Corps and the community have our commitment to maintain, preserve and enhance recreational opportunities at Philippi Park."

OPAL Foundation, a non-profit organization comprised of individuals and organizations, will provide financial and material contributions and volunteer support to open and maintain Philippi Park each year from Memorial Day through Labor Day weekends. The Corps and OPAL Foundation will conduct a range of activities and projects that support recreational opportunities and protect and preserve the archeological, natural, cultural and environmental features at the park.

Philippi Park is accessible only by boat and is located approximately one mile up the John Day River from its confluence with the Columbia. Parking and boat launch facilities are available at LePage Park. For a list of Philippi Park amenities, including camping and fishing, and information on other recreation opportunities in the vicinity of John Day Dam, visit http://www.nwp.usace.army.mil/Locations/ColumbiaRiver/JohnDay.aspx. Learn about Opal Foundation at www.opal-foundation.org.

- 30 -


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/982/94520/20021010AQV191001..JPG
Committee for Family Forestlands meets May 23
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/17/16 1:47 PM
Contact:
Nick Hennemann, Public Affairs Specialist, Salem, 503-945-7248
Lena Tucker, Deputy Chief Private Forests Division, Salem, 503-945-7529


The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet Monday, May 23 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The committee will finalize its annual report to the Board of Forestry and 2016-17 work plan. The meeting will be at the Oregon Department of Forestry's Headquarters, Santiam Room, Building D, 2600 State Street, Salem.

The meeting will also include:
Updates on the Private Forests Division, streamside shade buffer rulemaking, the Asian Gypsy Moth eradication project, and the 2016 fire season
Discussions about the bald eagle rules, seedling supply and demand, and compensation for ecosystem services

The 13-member Committee for Family Forestlands researches policies that affect family forestland viability, natural resource protection and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and State Forester. You can find more information at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/CFF.aspx.

Public Meetings
The public is invited to attend the meeting. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. For more information about attending the meeting please contact Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

###
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon April 2016 News Release
Oregon Employment Dept. - 05/17/16 10:00 AM
Oregon's Payroll Employment Gains 5,700 in April

Oregon's payroll employment grew by 5,700 in April, following a revised gain of 3,800 in March. The April gain was close to the average pace seen over the past 12 months. Oregon's unemployment rate held steady at 4.5 percent in April, the same as it was in March, and down significantly from 5.7 percent in April 2015.

In April, several major industries added jobs at a brisk pace. Professional and business services hired the most, adding 2,400. Next in line was government, which added 1,500. Three other industries added close to 1,000: health care and social assistance (+1,100 jobs); construction (+1,000); and other services (+1,000).

Manufacturing dropped by 1,300 jobs in April. Most of those losses were in durable goods manufacturing; however, Oregon's semiconductor and electronic component manufacturing industry added jobs in April.

A record 64,100 nonfarm payroll jobs were added in Oregon over the past 12 months, for an annual growth rate of 3.6 percent. The next closest over-the-year gain--since at least 1990--occurred in May 1997 when 61,500 jobs were added.

Since April 2015, job growth has been rapid in construction (+7,900 jobs, or 9.6%), and in several industries that grew by more than 5 percent: professional and business services (+13,000 jobs or 5.8%); other services (+3,400 jobs or 5.7%); and health care and social assistance (+11,200 jobs or 5.1%). Furthermore, growth was widespread among other industries, with most adding more than 3 percent. No industry declined significantly since April 2015, although manufacturing did cut 100 jobs.

Oregon's labor force participation rate rose to 62.6 percent in April, from 62.3 percent in March, and up from 60.8 percent in April 2015. The labor force participation rate is the share of the population 16 years and older that is employed or unemployed. It has been trending upward since last year.

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the April county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, May 24th, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for May on Tuesday, June 14th.??NLG

Notes:
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted except for the detailed industry employment components.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month's release incorporates the October, November and December 2015 tax records data. In addition, data for July 2015 through September 2015 were revised upward by a total of 1,200 to 1,900 per month. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

The pdf version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon Centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program -- auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.


Attached Media Files: Employment in Oregon April 2016 News Release
Mon. 05/16/16
Crash On Highway 20 Sends Three To Hospital West Of Sisters- Jefferson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/16/16 3:44 PM
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On May 16, 2016 at about 6:54AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle head-on crash on Highway 20 near milepost 83 (east of Santiam Summit).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2005 Chevrolet Colorado was traveling eastbound on Highway 20 when it lost control while negotiating a corner on a wet roadway. The Chevrolet spun out and into the path of a westbound 2016 Kia sport utility. The Chevrolet struck the Kia nearly head-on and then rolled over after impact.

The driver of the Chevrolet, Fredi TORRES REYES, age 20, of Woodburn, was transported by ground ambulance to Saint Charles Bend for non-life threatening injuries. The driver of the Kia, Terje WALTHINSEN, age 71, and his passenger, Timothy J WALTHINSEN, age 38, (both of Redmond) were taken by ground ambulance to Sisters where they were transferred to air ambulance. Both currently are at Saint Charles Bend with life threatening injuries.

Speeding by TORRES REYES is being considered a contributing factor in the crash. It was also learned TORRES REYES has a suspended Oregon Driver's License.

The westbound lanes of Highway 20 were closed for about five hours while the investigation was conducted. OSP was assisted by the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, Black Butte Police Department, Black Butte Fire Department, Sisters - Camp Sherman Fire Department and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

More information will be released when it becomes available as this is an ongoing investigation.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1002/94492/IMG_0955.JPG
Cottage Grove Man Killed In Crash On Highway 99 - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/16/16 3:22 PM
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On May 16, 2016 at about 8:17AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle crash on Highway 99 near River Road (just north of Cottage Grove).

A 2004 Subaru wagon was traveling northbound on Highway 99 , when for unknown reasons, veered off the east shoulder of the highway and then crossed over into the southbound lane. A southbound 2014 Chevrolet van struck the Subaru on the rear passenger side.

The driver of the Subaru, Connor R FITCH, age 18, of Cottage Grove, was taken by ambulance to Cottage Grove Community Hospital where he later died from his injuries. The driver of the Chevrolet, Bryan A ROSS, age 25 of Eugene, was not injured.

Highway 99 was closed for three hours while the investigation was conducted. OSP was assisted by South Lane Fire, the Cottage Grove Police Department and the Oregon Department of Transportation. More information will be released when it becomes available as this is an ongoing investigation.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1002/94489/100_0653.JPG , 2016-05/1002/94489/100_0643.JPG
BLM Gathering Public Input on Coal Program at Six Public Meetings Public Participation is Next Step in Comprehensive Coal Program Review
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 05/16/16 3:02 PM
Washington, D.C.--As the next step in the Department of the Interior's comprehensive review of the federal coal program, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will solicit public input at six public meetings starting with Casper, Wyo., on May 17.

Meetings in Casper, Wyo., Salt Lake City, Knoxville, Seattle, and Grand Junction, Colo., will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. local time. The Pittsburgh meeting will be held from 1 to 7 p.m. local time. Specifics for all of the upcoming public scoping meetings can be found below:

May 17, 2016 Casper Events Center
1 Events Drive
Casper, WY 82601
Doors open for speaker registration at 8:30 a.m.; meeting 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

May 19, 2016 Salt Palace Convention Center
90 South West Temple
Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Doors open for speaker registration at 8:00 a.m., meeting 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

May 26, 2016 Tennessee Theatre
604 S. Gay Street
Knoxville, TN 37902
Doors open for speaker registration at 8:00 a.m.; meeting 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

June 21, 2016 Sheraton Seattle Downtown
1400 6th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
Doors open for speaker registration at 8:00 a.m.; meeting 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

June 23, 2016 Two Rivers Convention Center Avalon Theatre
645 Main Street
Grand Junction, CO 81501
Doors open for speaker registration at 8:00 a.m.; meeting 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

June 28, 2016 Pittsburgh Convention Center
1000 Fort Duquesne Boulevard
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
Doors open for speaker registration at 11:00 a.m.; meeting 1 to 7 p.m.
Please note this is a new date; the meeting originally scheduled for June 16, 2016, is now scheduled for June 28, 2016.

The meetings in Casper, Wyo., Seattle and Pittsburgh will be live-streamed at www.blm.gov/live,and; meetings in Salt Lake City, Knoxville, Tenn., and Grand Junction, Colo., will have a toll-free, listen-only audio link available via telephone.

Those who attend the meetings in person and who wish to speak will be asked to sign in. Speakers will be called upon on a first-come, first-served basis determined by sign-in order. Attendees wishing to speak will be accommodated to the fullest extent possible given the time available. The maximum speaking time per speaker is three minutes.

Written comments may be submitted until July 28, 2016, using one of the following methods:

Email: BLM_WO_Coal_Program_PEIS_Comments@blm.gov

Mail: Coal Programmatic EIS Scoping
Bureau of Land Management
20 M St. SE, Room 2134 LM
Washington, D.C. 20003

Please note that the deadline for submitting written comments was changed to July 28, 2016, due to the rescheduling of the Pittsburgh public scoping meeting.

Additional information on the PEIS can be found here, and additional information on the federal coal program can be found here. The Notice of Intent to prepare a Programmatic EIS can be found here.

-BLM-


Attached Media Files: BLM Gathering Public Input on Coal Program at Six Public Meetings
***Update- Family Contacted *** OSP Seeks Assistance In Contacting Deceased Man's Family - Wasco County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/16/16 2:44 PM
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DELAVERGNE's family has been contacted and OSP is no longer seeking the public's assistance. OSP is thankful to the media outlets who put this out to the public.
End Release

Previous Release:
On Tuesday, May 10, 2016 at approximately 7:30AM, Troopers from The Dalles Area Command, responded to a campsite off I-84 near milepost 79 (just west of The Dalles) to the report of a deceased male. The circumstances surrounding this death are not suspicious and are being investigated by the Wasco County Medical Examiner as being medically related.

This individual was a long time, local homeless resident to the area and is identified as 69 year old Donald Vernon DELAVERGNE, who most recently was using the last name of WONDER. DELAVERGNE was discovered by a local good-Samaritan who had befriended and had been assisting DELAVERGNE.

The OSP has taken extensive measures in an effort to locate and identify any possible next-of-kin without success. Information developed points to DELAVERGNE having lived in the Willamette Valley over 20 years ago, specifically in the Forest Grove area. It is also believed he may have relatives on the East Coast of the United States.

OSP is asking that anyone who might recognize or be familiar with DELAVERGNE or his next-of-kin, to contact Senior Trooper Michael Holloran at 541-296-9646 x 5330. The Oregon State Police was assisted by the Wasco County Sheriff's office, the Oregon Department of Transportation, the Wasco County District Attorney, and the Wasco County Medical Examiner and Spencer.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1002/94473/IMG_3731.JPG
OMMP introducing inventory reporting system during public meetings
Oregon Health Authority - 05/16/16 2:40 PM
May 16, 2016

New tool to allow growers, dispensaries, processors to report mandated medical marijuana production, transfer info online

The Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) at the Oregon Health Authority has scheduled a series of public meetings around the state to present its new online inventory reporting system for marijuana and marijuana products.

New reporting rules that took effect March 1--OAR 333-008-0630, 333-008-1248 and 333-008-1830--require growers, dispensaries and processors to report to OMMP information about the production and transfer of medical marijuana.

The first online submission is due July 10, 2016, for transfers that occurred during June 2016. Subsequent reporting is due on a monthly basis by the 10th of each month.

During May and June, OMMP staff members will offer several in-person state-wide presentations on the OMMP inventory reporting system. The presentations will provide guidance and training on how to use the system, what information must be reported, and clarification on transfer rules.

The presentations also will show growers how to register online. Each presentation will last about 45 minutes, with time afterward to assist growers with setting up online accounts. The presentations and trainings will occur on the following dates and locations:

-- May 24--Josephine County Public Library, 200 NW C St., Grants Pass, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Presentations: 10 a.m., 11:30 a.m.
-- May 25--Eugene Public Library, 100 W 10th Ave., 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Presentations: 11 a.m., 1:30 p.m.
-- May 27--Medford Public Library, 205 S Central Ave., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Presentations: 10 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 2 p.m.
-- June 2--Newport Public Library, 35 NW Nye St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Presentations: 11 a.m., 2 p.m.
-- June 3--Seaside Public Library, 1131 Broadway St., 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Presentations: 10 a.m., noon.
-- June 6--Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St. Room 1B, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Presentations: 10 a.m., noon, 2 p.m.
-- June 8--Downtown Bend Library, 601 NW Wall St., 1:30-5 p.m. Presentations: 1:30, 3, 4 p.m.
-- June 23-- Medford Public Library, 205 S Central Ave., 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Presentations: 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 2 p.m.

A new reporting web page will be available on the program's website at http://www.healthoregon.org/ommp starting May 20. A PowerPoint overview of the online reporting system also will be available by May 20 on the OMMP website.

Growers, dispensaries and processors that fail to comply with the new rules can have their registration card or certificate revoked or suspended. Civil penalties of up to $500 per day also can be imposed.

For more information and updates, visit the program's website at http://www.healthoregon.org/ommp

# # #
Backyard debris burning: How to do it safely
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/16/16 2:29 PM
May is Wildfire Awareness Month and the ideal time to reduce the excess vegetation around your home that could pose a wildfire threat. As you begin spring clean-up, Keep Oregon Green, the Oregon Department of Forestry and the Oregon State Fire Marshal urge you to consider chipping or recycling your yard debris. If burning is the only option to dispose of woody material, fire officials urge landowners to follow safe burning practices.

"If you do burn your debris, use common sense and follow safety rules," said State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. "This can prevent most debris burn-caused wildfires, and keep lives and property safe."

Escaped debris burns are the leading human cause of wildfire issues in Oregon, particularly during the early- and late-season periods when people think it is safe and permissible to burn. In 2015, backyard debris burns that escaped control resulted in 133 wildfires burning 224 acres at a cost of nearly $381,000.

Oregon experienced severe fire seasons in 2013-15. Extreme conditions those three years set the stage for any debris burn that got away to spread rapidly.

A burn pile is less likely to escape control if these simple safety tips are followed:
?,?
CALL BEFORE YOU BURN -- Burning regulations are not the same in all areas and can vary with weather and fuel conditions. If you're planning to burn, check with your local ODF district, fire protective association, or air protection authority to learn if there are any current burning restrictions in effect, and whether a permit is required.
?,?
KNOW THE WEATHER FORECAST -- Never burn on dry or windy days. These conditions make it easy for open burning to spread out of control.
?,?
CLEAR A 10-FOOT RADIUS AROUND YOUR PILE -- Also make sure there are no tree branches or power lines above.
?,?
KEEP YOUR BURN PILE SMALL - A large burn may cast hot embers long distances. Small piles, 4x4 feet, are recommended. Add debris in small amounts as existing material is consumed.
?,?
ALWAYS HAVE WATER AND FIRE TOOLS ON SITE -- When burning, have a charged water hose, bucket of water, and shovel and dirt nearby to extinguish the fire. Drown the pile with water, stir the coals, and drown again, repeating till the fire is DEAD out.
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STAY WITH THE FIRE UNTIL IT IS COMPLETELY OUT -- Monitoring a debris burn continually from start to finish until dead out is required by state law, to ensure that any escaped sparks or embers can be extinguished quickly. Go back and recheck old burn piles, as they can retain heat for several weeks and then rekindle when the weather warms and wind begins to blow.
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NEVER USE GASOLINE or other accelerants (flammable or combustible liquids) to start or increase your open fire. Every year, 10 to 15 percent of all burn injuries treated at the Oregon Burn Center in Portland are the result of backyard debris burning.

BURN ONLY YARD DEBRIS -- State regulations prohibit the open burning of any material that creates dense smoke or noxious odors.

ESCAPED DEBRIS BURNS ARE COSTLY -- State law requires the proper clearing, building, attending and extinguishing of open fires any time of year. A first-time citation carries a $110 fine. If your debris burn spreads out of control, you are responsible for the cost of fire suppression and very likely the damage to neighboring properties. This can range from a few hundred to thousands of dollars.

More tips on wildfire prevention, including campfire safety, use of motorized equipment, and fire-resistant landscaping can be found on the Keep Oregon Green site, www.keeporegongreen.org
Corrections Deputies and Officers to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Oregon Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/16/16 1:34 PM
The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of Basic Corrections Local #BCL022 on Friday May 20, 2016 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon.

We would like to invite you to join us in observing the ceremony and congratulating Basic Corrections #BCL022 on their successful completion of basic training.
The event will begin at 11 am with a reception to follow after the ceremony. Sheriff Mark Garton of the Polk County Sheriff's Office will be the guest speaker.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Members of Graduating Class BCL022

Deputy Sheriff Mark Albertson
Lake County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Stephen Berger
Tillamook County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Larry Black
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jamie Burch
Clatsop County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Joshua Chapman
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Martin Clark
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Corrections Officer Andrew Coffey
Warm Springs Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Daniel Ehrich
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Sheriff Benjamin Eide
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office


Corrections Officer Ramiro Flores-Ramos
Washington County Community Corrections

Deputy Sheriff Cody Fuhrman
Jackson County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Ethan Gilbert
Baker County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Joseph Halahuni
Benton County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Aaron Hatfield
Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Nicholas Hellman
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Max Hemphill
Douglas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Bradley Hern
Marion County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Donald Hofferber
Polk County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Skip Jones
Yamhill County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Steven Josephson
Jackson County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Trudy Kame
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Ryan Kirsch
Josephine County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Thomas LaRoque
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Dylan Lemieux
Lane County Sheriff's Office


Deputy Sheriff Brittany Lindquist
Clackamas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Robert Mosser
Lane County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Oliver Persons
Linn County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Brooke Peterson
Crook County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jeffrey Reinke
Klamath County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jordan Rhodes
Curry County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Shawn Rice
Malheur County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Daniel Rierson
Polk County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Matthew Ryan
Josephine County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Alexandra Steene
Polk County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Jenna Sukle
Linn County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Danielle Thurnbauer
Jackson County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Daren Tolley
Klamath County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Tessy Workman
Clatsop County Sheriff's Office


## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Chief Kent Barker of the City of Tualatin Police Department serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
Coalition of Local Health Officials meets May 19 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 05/16/16 1:12 PM
May 16, 2016

What: The monthly public meeting of the Coalition of Local Public Health Officials.

Agenda: Updates; Modernization Assessment Report; Reproductive Health Program element changes; Immunization Program element changes; marijuana revenue and prevention efforts. Agenda available on the coalition's website at http://oregonclho.org/about/clho-meetings/.

When: Thursday, May 19, 9:30 a.m. to noon. The meeting is open to the public. No conference call option is available for the public.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1E

The Coalition of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the rules and standards for public health specified in ORS 431.345 and 431.350.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. To request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations call the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For meeting information, contact Danna Drum at 971-673-1223 or danna.k.drum@state.or.us.

# # #
Independence Woman Killed In Crash West Of Monmouth - Polk County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/16/16 10:18 AM
2016-05/1002/94470/20160202_155635.jpg
2016-05/1002/94470/20160202_155635.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1002/94470/thumb_20160202_155635.jpg
On May 15, 2016 at about 12:50PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle, head-on crash on Highway 194 near milepost 6 (west of Monmouth on Fishback Road).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 1997 Dodge Neon was traveling eastbound on Highway 194 (also known as Monmouth Highway) when it crossed the centerline striking a 2006 Dodge pickup head-on. The driver of the Neon, Tara C KADELL, age 30, of Independence, was pronounced deceased on scene.

The driver of the pickup, Lacey C MCLAREN, age 23, of Portland, was not injured. Two other passengers, a four year old girl and a six year old girl, were also not injured. It was discovered MCLAREN had a felony warrant for Theft I issued by Linn County Sheriff's Office. She was arrested and lodged at the Polk County Jail.

A male passenger in the pickup, fled the scene prior to law enforcement arriving. He was later identified as Jason Lee GREER, age 33, of Oregon City. It was learned GREER had a misdemeanor warrant for his arrest. At the time of this release, GREER has not been located.

Witnesses reported observing the Neon driving at a high rate of speed prior to the crash. Highway 194 was closed for about five hours while the investigation was being conducted. OSP was assisted by Monmouth Fire, Polk County Sheriff's Office, Polk County District Attorney's Office and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1002/94470/20160202_155635.jpg , 2016-05/1002/94470/McLaren.png , 2016-05/1002/94470/Greer_-_photo_date_7-2010.JPG
Sun. 05/15/16
Evergreen Aviation Museum to celebrate the Oregon Air Guard's 75th anniversary (Date Corrected- May 21)
Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum - 05/15/16 5:25 PM
MCMINNVILLE - On Armed Forces Day, May 21, join the Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., as they celebrate the Oregon Air National Guard's 75th anniversary.

The public is invited to tour the museum and meet current and former Air National Guard members that have flown or maintained Oregon's fighter jets, and who have served in support of the Air Guard's statewide mission.

Oregon's Air Guard has been protecting the skies over the Pacific Northwest and Canada for nearly 70 years. For more than seven decades Oregon military air units in Portland and Klamath Falls have flown the F-15, F-4C, F-101, F-102, F-89, F-86, F-84 and T-33. All of these jets are on display at the museum.

"This is an opportunity for people to meet living military heroes from the past and present and see the aircraft that Oregon's Air Guard has flown over the years," said Melissa Grace, the museum's marketing and events director. "We're proud to honor and salute the Air Guard and these Oregon airmen for 75 years of distinguished service to our state and country."

The history of the Oregon Air National Guard began just prior to World War II as the United States monitored the wars raging in Europe and China. Soon, U.S. military leaders began to focus more on preparations for war.

In early 1941 Army Reserve Major G. Robert Dodson requested and received approval from the National Guard Bureau to activate the Oregon National Guard's first aviation unit. With 117 volunteers, the newly-formed 123rd Observation Squadron (OS) was activated on April 18, 1941.

Within hours of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on Dec. 7, 1941, air crews assigned to the 123rd OS flew aircraft from their training base at Gray Field, near McChord Field in Tacoma, Wash., to the Oregon and Washington coast lines and began aerial patrols. Sixty years later, on Sept. 11, 2001, similar air defense missions were flown throughout the Northwest by the Oregon Air Guard. These missions continued for many days following the attacks on America.

Statewide the Oregon Air National Guard has more than 2,200 volunteer airmen who serve. Today, as a vital asset to the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and Air Combat Command, the 142nd Fighter Wing at Portland Air Base maintains 24-hour Aerospace Control Alert in the Pacific Northwest while providing air superiority mission capabilities.

Oregon's 173rd Fighter Wing in Klamath Falls is the home for the U.S. Air Force's only base where pilots are trained to fly the F-15 Eagle.

The museum is a non-profit organization and is located at 500 NE Captain Michael King Smith Way in McMinnville, just off of highway 18. For more information go to www.evergreenmuseum.org.
Fri. 05/13/16
Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board to meet May 19 in Salem
Oregon Health Authority - 05/13/16 3:02 PM
Media contact: Susan Stigers, 503-884-7215, susan.stigers@state.or.us
Program contact: Jacee Vangestel, 503-945-2852, jacee.m.vangestel@state.or.us

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board to meet May 19 in Salem

What: Public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board

When: 1-5 p.m., Thursday, May 19

Where: Callan Conference Room, Kirkbride Building, third floor, Oregon State Hospital, 2600 Center Street NE. The public also can attend via toll-free conference line at 877-848-7030, participant code 297588.

Details: The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, agency director and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. To request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations, call the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For more information, see the board's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/osh/Pages/advisory-board.aspx.

# # #
Oregon Medicaid Advisory Committee to meet in Salem May 25
Oregon Health Authority - 05/13/16 1:33 PM
May 13, 2016

Contact: Alissa Robbins, 503-490-6590 (media inquiries)
Oliver Droppers, 503-507-2990 (meeting information and accommodation)

What: The monthly public meeting of the Medicaid Advisory Committee.

When: Wednesday, May 25, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Where: Oregon State Library, Room 102/103, 250 Winter St., NE, Salem. The meeting will also be available via webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5672779983090523140. The public also may join by a listen-only conference line at 888-398-2342, access code 3732275.

Details: Oregon Health Authority staff will present an update on Oregon's 1115 Waiver renewal including a brief presentation on the proposed Coordinated Health Partnership concept. The committee will hear formal public comments after the waiver presentation.

Also at the meeting Bruce Austin, MD, OHA's dental director, will discuss OHA's Oral Health Strategic Plan. The Oregon Health Authority has charged the Medicaid Advisory Committee with developing a framework for defining and measuring oral health access for Oregon Health Plan members.

For more information on the 1115 Waiver renewal, see the draft renewal application at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Documents/Oregon%27s%20Draft%20Waiver%20Application.pdf . For more on the Coordinated Health Partnership concept, see pages 23-32 in the application.

OHA is accepting public comment on the draft waiver through June 1. Comments may be submitted to Janna.Starr@state.or.us, or through an online survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QP7W23N.

For webinar information, meeting minutes, reports and updates, please visit the Committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPR/MAC/Pages/index.aspx.

# # #
Oregon holding onto forests, farms and rangeland
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/13/16 12:55 PM
Oregon has done remarkably well in preserving forests, farms and rangeland from development, according to a recent study, "Forests, Farms, and People: Land Use Change on Non-Federal Land in Oregon, 1974-2014." The researchers pored over thousands of aerial photographs to compare changes in the use of private and non-federal public lands from the mid-1970s through 2014.

Conducted by the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station and the Oregon Department of Forestry, the study included three key findings:

1. Ninety-nine percent of all non-Federal land in Oregon that was in resource land uses in 1984 (after comprehensive land-use plans were implemented) remained in those uses in 2014.

2. Development of resource land to low-density residential or urban uses was consistent with land-use goals, plans and zoning. Most development of resource lands occurred adjacent or close to existing developed areas, thereby minimizing development scattered though Oregon's forests and farm lands.

3. Structures continued to be built on lands remaining in forest, agricultural and range uses at high rates, even after the implementation of county comprehensive land-use plans. But the impact of these additional structures on management of Oregon's resource lands was lessened, because most of the structures built are relatively close to land in low-density residential or urban uses.

According to forest economist Gary Lettman, one of the study authors, questions remain despite the recent slowdown in building on Oregon's resource lands.

"With projected economic growth and increasing populations, how will these increases in population be accommodated while protecting remaining resource lands from development?" he said. "And will it be possible to have affordable housing in Portland, Bend and other Oregon cities while still protecting remaining resource lands from development?"

Other questions in need of answers, he said, include how development is affecting wildland fire protection and suppression costs, water quality, and land-use conflicts. Research should also be conducted to look for opportunities where underproductive resource land can be released for development.

The land-use change study can be obtained by sending a request to: rod.l.nichols@oregon.gov
Federal partners unveil safer, more efficient turbine at Ice Harbor Dam (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 05/13/16 12:24 PM
This new advanced turbine is expected to improve fish passage and increase power generation at Ice Harbor Lock and Dam in southeast Washington state.
This new advanced turbine is expected to improve fish passage and increase power generation at Ice Harbor Lock and Dam in southeast Washington state.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1236/94431/thumb_New-Turbine-Ice-Harbor-Dam.JPG
BURBANK, Wash. -- An advanced-technology turbine, designed to improve fish passage at federal dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers is being installed at Ice Harbor Lock and Dam in southeast Washington state.

The $58 million project, funded by BPA, calls for runner replacements on two turbines, one fixed-blade, one adjustable, along with fish passageway improvements at Ice Harbor over the next few years.

The first turbine is set to be operational within 12 to 14 months. The work includes structural modifications to the turbine draft tube exits to improve hydraulic conditions for fish. The contracts also contain options to fabricate and install a third turbine runner.

The turbine design and installation is a collaboration between contractor, Voith Hydro Inc. of York, Pa., the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Bonneville Power Administration and NOAA Fisheries. Small-scale model testing of the new fixed-blade runner design indicates it may also increase power generation by 3 to 4 percent.

"After 50 years of operation and increasing maintenance requirements, the need to replace the existing turbine runners at Ice Harbor presented the opportunity to pursue new turbine runner designs with fish passage improvement as a priority," said Kevin Crum, project manager.

Voith Hydro Inc. used digital and physical models, and multiple design cycles to settle on two styles of high-tech runners, (turbine runners are the parts that rotate in water to generate power). The turbine runners are made of stainless steel to fight water corrosion.

BPA engineer George Brown called the work an "excellent example of collaboration among BPA, the Corps, NOAA and a capable contractor."

"The key ingredient holding us all together is the goal of creating meaningful improvements to the environmental performance of a critical Northwest power resource," Brown says. "The efficiency and reliability benefits to the hydroelectric system are an important bonus, stretching the value of the limited water resource."

Advanced-technology turbines could eventually extend beyond Ice Harbor to replace aging infrastructure at other Columbia and Snake river dams.

The latest monitoring shows that less than 10 percent of all migrating juvenile salmon and steelhead pass through turbines on the Snake river, depending on the dam and the species of fish. At Ice Harbor Dam that number is between 0.5 to 8.6 percent. Most out-migrating fish use surface passage, such as spillway weirs, on their way to the ocean. About 93 to 96 percent of all young salmon and steelhead now survive passage at each dam in the Federal Columbia River Power System.

For more information about the Ice Harbor turbine runner design and other programs to benefit Columbia River salmon and steelhead, visit: www.nww.usace.army.mil/Missions/FishPrograms.aspx and www.salmonrecovery.gov.


Attached Media Files: This new advanced turbine is expected to improve fish passage and increase power generation at Ice Harbor Lock and Dam in southeast Washington state.
Wild Horses and Burros on Public Rangelands Now 2.5 Times Greater than 1971 when Protection Law Was Passed (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 05/13/16 10:56 AM
Wild Horses
Wild Horses
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/5514/94428/thumb_23042755566_6b84b50403_k.jpg
BLM seeks to expand initiatives to address problems with new legislative authority

46,000 Horses Already Being Cared for Off-Range
Off-Range Care of Unadopted Horses Would Exceed $1 Billion
Necessary Horse Gathers Exceed Available Space and Funding

The Bureau of Land Management announced today that as of March 1, 2016, more than 67,000 wild horses and burros are roaming Western public rangelands -- a 15 percent increase over the estimated 2015 population.

The updated numbers show more than twice the number of horses on the range than is recommended under BLM land use plans. It is also two and a half times the number of horses and burros that were estimated to be in existence when the Wild and Free Roaming Horses and Burros Act was passed in 1971. To help address the problem, BLM is seeking legislative authority for additional initiatives.

"Over the past seven years we have doubled the amount of funding used for managing our nation's wild horses and burros," said BLM Director Neil Kornze. "Despite this, major shifts in the adoption market and the absence of a long-term fertility control drug have driven population levels higher. A number of program reforms are underway, but assistance is needed from our local, state, and federal partners."

While herds of wild horses consistently double in size every four years, there has also been a dramatic decrease in adoptions in recent years. In the early 2000s, nearly 8,000 horses were being placed with private adopters each year. Due to a number of economic factors, that number is now down to roughly 2,500 animals each year, compounding an already difficult management situation.

The total lifetime cost of caring for an unadopted animal that is removed from the range is substantial. Costs for lifetime care in a corral approaches $50,000 per horse. With 46,000 horses and burros already in off-range corrals and pastures, this means that without new opportunities for placing these animals with responsible owners, the BLM will spend more than a billion dollars to care for and feed these animals over the remainder of their lives. Given this vast financial commitment, the BLM is now severely limited in how many animals it can afford to remove from the range.

To address these issues the BLM is taking a number of steps, including sponsoring a significant research program focused on fertility control; transitioning horses from off-range corrals to more cost-effective pastures; working to increase adoptions with new programs and partnerships; and requesting two new pieces of legislative authority -- one to allow for the immediate transfer of horses to other agencies that have a need for work animals and one that would create a congressionally-chartered foundation that could help fund and support adoption efforts. Additional tools and resources are needed to bring this program onto a sustainable path.

The table below shows the 2016 West-wide, on-range population on a state-by-state basis as of March 1, 2016. This year's 15 percent increase over the 2015 population compares to an 18 percent increase from 2014 to 2015. The BLM plans to remove 3,500 wild horses and burros from Western public rangelands in 2016.

Wild Horse and Burro On-Range Population as of March 1, 2016
State Horses Burros Total Maximum AML
AZ 318 5,317 5,635 1,676
CA 4,925 3,391 8,316 2,200
CO 1,530 0 1,530 812
ID 468 0 468 617
MT 160 0 160 120
NV 31,979 2,552 34,531 12,811
NM 171 0 171 83
OR 3,785 56 3,841 2,715
UT 5,440 400 5,840 1,956
WY 6,535 0 6,535 3,725
TOTAL 55,311 11,716 67,027 26,715

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's mission is to manage and conserve the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations under our mandate of multiple-use and sustained yield. In Fiscal Year 2015, the BLM generated $4.1 billion in receipts from activities occurring on public lands.


Attached Media Files: BLM Wild Horse and Burro Population , Wild Horses
Find farm stands & u-picks with Oregon's Bounty (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 05/13/16 9:21 AM
Use a smartphone to easily find farm stands, u-pick fields, on-farm festivals — and get driving directions — with Oregon’s Bounty at www.oregonfb.org.
Use a smartphone to easily find farm stands, u-pick fields, on-farm festivals — and get driving directions — with Oregon’s Bounty at www.oregonfb.org.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/5507/94422/thumb_OregonsBounty.jpg
Use a smartphone to easily find farm stands, u-pick fields, on-farm festivals -- and get driving directions -- with Oregon's Bounty at www.oregonfb.org.

Strawberries, asparagus, squash, and salad greens -- not to mention a vast array of bedding plants, flowering baskets, and fresh-cut flowers -- are just a few favorites of the agricultural bounty of spring. But if you want to buy directly from the source on a trip out to the countryside, where do you go?

"Everyone knows where their local farmers market is. But what about farm stands, u-pick fields, and on-farm festivals out in rural areas? That's where Oregon's Bounty comes in," said OFB Communications Director Anne Marie Moss.

Oregon's Bounty at oregonfb.org is a searchable directory of over 300 family farms and ranches that sell food and foliage directly to the public.

Easily navigable with a smartphone, Oregon's Bounty allows visitors to search for specific agriculture products -- like strawberries, cauliflower, and eggs -- and/or search for farms within a region of the state. Visitors can also do a search for "u-pick" or "events" to find farms that offer those activities.

Once a farm stand is located, visitors can get driving directions from their current location or another address.

"Oregonians love farm-fresh food. Thanks to the diversity of Oregon agriculture, we can buy an enormous variety of fruits, vegetables, meat, nuts, flowers, and foliage directly from the families who raised it," said Moss.

"Each of the farms listed in Oregon's Bounty are owned and operated by Farm Bureau members, who are proud to share what they've raised with the public," said Moss. "Spring is a great time to take a trip into the beautiful countryside and experience Oregon agriculture firsthand."

###

Note to Editors: "Farm Bureau" is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

The state's largest general farm organization, Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing the interests of the state's farmers and ranchers in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon in 1919, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties and has 7,000 member families that are professionally engaged in agriculture.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Barry Bushue is a third-generation farmer raising a variety of vegetables and berries at a nearly century-old farm near Boring, Oregon. He is OFB's 15th president.


Attached Media Files: Use a smartphone to easily find farm stands, u-pick fields, on-farm festivals — and get driving directions — with Oregon’s Bounty at www.oregonfb.org.
Public Health Advisory Board meets May 19 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 05/13/16 8:54 AM
May 13, 2016

What: The monthly public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Review of the Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant work plan; discussion about the public health modernization work plan and assessment; reports from the board's subcommittees.

When: Thursday, May 19, 2:30-5:30 p.m. A 15-minute public comment period is scheduled at 5:15 p.m. Comments are limited to three minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The meeting will also be live streamed through the Public Health Advisory Board website at http://www.healthoregon.org/phab.

Oregon's Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon's governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon's State Health Improvement Plan.

For more information contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284 or cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us.

# # #
Thu. 05/12/16
Western Forestry Leaders Gather to Discuss the Connection Between People and Forests (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/12/16 3:50 PM
The nation's western forestry leaders tour Portland's Forest Park, the largest urban forest in the nation at 5,160 acres, to learn more about urban forestry issues, partnerships, and connections.
The nation's western forestry leaders tour Portland's Forest Park, the largest urban forest in the nation at 5,160 acres, to learn more about urban forestry issues, partnerships, and connections.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1072/94407/thumb_WFLC2016TourForestPark.jpg
Portland, OR -- Today the Western Forestry Leadership Coalition (WFLC), in partnership with the Council of Western State Foresters (CWSF) concluded their 2016 Spring meeting. This event, hosted in conjunction with the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF), the US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region and the Pacific Northwest Research Station, brought together Western forestry leaders to discuss the connection between people and forests.

The two-day event attracted nearly 100 attendees from across the United States, including state foresters from 23 western states and Pacific islands and their counterparts from the U.S. Forest Service. On behalf of Oregon Governor Kate Brown, Kristen Leonard, Governor Brown's Chief of Staff, greeted attendees and welcomed them to Oregon.

"The goals of the Western Forestry Leadership Coalition and the Council of Western State Foresters exemplify a lesson I learned early on as a Forest Service kid: forests are not ours, they are everyone's," said Leonard in her welcome. "Thank you for your commitment to preserving our nation's forests and ensuring their long-term resilience for future generations to enjoy."

The welcoming session also featured a keynote by Robert Bonnie, USDA Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment and an introduction to Oregon forest issues and dynamics from Oregon State Forester Doug Decker.

"The Western Forestry Leadership Coalition consistently brings together thought leaders and practitioners to discuss issues of the day," said Under Secretary Bonnie. "This meeting was focused around collaborative work among key partners and the connection of people and forests which is especially relevant here in the Pacific Northwest."

During the 2016 Spring Meeting, attendees had an opportunity to participate in a field tour to the Tillamook State Forest with stops along the way detailing the urban and community forestry work in Portland's Forest Park. ODF representatives helped to facilitate the tour and educate attendees on the complexities of the urban to rural continuum.

"With 30 million acres of forests in Oregon, Portland is a prime location to host a gathering of the public sector forest policy leaders in the Western United States," said Doug Decker, Oregon state forester. "We showcased the ways in which Oregonians are connected with forests, the diversity of different landowner objectives across public and private forest ownerships, and the innovative public-private partnerships arising around sustainable forestry."

Key topics of the meeting included regional and national partnerships, natural resources in the West and USDA Forest Service priorities in the Western United States. The meeting also included a presentation on the Intertribal Timber Council's Anchor Forests Project. Other notable speakers included representatives from partner organizations such as the Conservation Fund, the Society of American Foresters, the Rural Voices for Conservation Coalition and The Nature Conservancy.

"WFLC is a unique group that brings together the most current science and management to highlight issues and solutions in sustainable forest management in the west," said Rob Mangold, Pacific Northwest Forest Research Station Director.

The meeting concluded with the US Forest Service Deputy Chief of State & Private Forestry, Jim Hubbard, speaking to the group about the upcoming fire season, the important programs and work happening on the ground and his vision of what the next five years will entail.

"Holding the WFLC Spring Meeting in Oregon highlighted the complex issues facing our Western forests and how critical our engagement is in cross-boundary work and collaboration," said Jim Pena, WFLC member and Regional Forester for the Pacific Northwest Region headquartered in Portland.

To learn more about the Western Forestry Leadership Coalition, visit www.wflccenter.org. WFLC is staffed and supported by CWSF. To learn more about CWSF, visit http://www.westernforesters.org/.

###

About the Western Forestry Leadership Coalition

Formally established in 2000, the Western Forestry Leadership Coalition (WFLC) represents a unique partnership between the Council of Western State Foresters and federal government forestry leaders. WFLC is comprised of 34 members from across the federal and state agencies of the West which include: 23 state members (also known as the Council of Western State Foresters) which include State, Territorial, and Commonwealth Foresters of the West and American-affiliated islands of the Pacific; and 11 USDA Forest Service members, which include: seven Western Regional Foresters, three Western USFS Research Station Directors, and one USFS Forest Products Lab Director.

About the Council of Western State Foresters

The Council of Western State Foresters (CWSF) is a nonpartisan organization of state, territorial, and commonwealth foresters of the Western United States and Pacific Islands. State Foresters are charged with providing forest management assistance to landowners, managing state trust lands, and supplying wildfire and forest health protection services. CWSF staff and members participate in the Western Forestry Leadership Coalition with Western members of the U.S. Forest Service leadership. CWSF cultivates partnerships, raises awareness and takes action on the most important issues affecting forests in the Western United States and Pacific Islands.


Attached Media Files: The nation's western forestry leaders tour Portland's Forest Park, the largest urban forest in the nation at 5,160 acres, to learn more about urban forestry issues, partnerships, and connections.
Client and Staff Safety Task Force will meet June 29 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/12/16 3:07 PM
The Client and Staff Safety Task Force meeting is planned for Wednesday, June 29, 2016, 1 to 3:30 p.m. at the Oregon State Capitol, Hearing Room B, 900 Court Street NE, in Salem. This meeting is open to the public.

The conference call number for those who are unable to attend in person is: 1-877-873-8017; enter participant code 772325# when prompted.

The task force is directed to make recommendations on staff safety, resident care, and the operation of Stabilization and Crisis Units. The task force will meet approximately six times and provide a report to the Legislature by September 15, 2016.

The task force will consider and make recommendations for:
Ensuring the dignity and self-determination of each resident in a Stabilization and Crisis Unit
Improving the safety of staff employed by a Stabilization and Crisis Unit
Improving the training and support for staff
Staffing levels
Reducing incidents of aggressive and assaultive behavior by residents
Reducing the need for staff to work overtime
Improving access to appropriate mental health supports and intervention methods
Ensuring the timely transition of residents in Stabilization and Crisis Units when ready to be placed with a residential service provider in the community, including recommendations for building capacity in community-based care settings.

An agenda will be coming in a later communication.

All meetings of this task force will conform to Oregon public meetings laws. Request for an accommodation for a person with disabilities should be made to Angie Allbee and should be made at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting. For more information, contact Angie Allbee, DHS Legislative Coordinator, at 503-689-5034.
# # #
OSSA Protests BLM new management plan
Oregon State Sheriffs' Assoc. - 05/12/16 1:05 PM
The Oregon State Sheriffs Association (OSSA) along with numerous other organizations have reviewed the newest management plan released by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) for 2.5 million acres of O&C timberland here in Oregon. OSSA takes a strong interest in this plan because federal law provides that the primary use of these O&C lands is to be used for a sustainable timber harvest that provides a revenue stream for Oregon counties. That revenue stream is supposed to help these counties provide a variety of public services, including law enforcement. Quite simply, the BLM plan ignores clear law and proposes a timber harvest plan that will continue to place these counties in a fiscal crisis.

The BLM refused to even consider revenues for counties as an objective in developing its plan, even though that is mandated by statute and case law. It has routinely ignored comments from affected counties, concerned citizens, and state and federal legislators. There are many ways the BLM could have balanced jobs and revenues for vital County services while creating habitat for endangered species, providing clean water, recreational opportunities, and improving fire resiliency. This federal agency has once again failed the communities where these public lands are located. In light of this, nearly half the counties in Oregon have announced they would challenge the plan in federal court. No county wants to use precious taxpayer dollars to sue the federal government, but the BLM's arrogance has left these counties with no other viable options.

The law governing management of the BLM lands states that all timberlands shall be managed for sustained yield production, with the revenues shared with Counties to help pay for public services. The law also mandates a minimum harvest each year of 500 million board feet. The BLM's final plan violates both requirements, with more than 75% of the lands locked up in permanent reserves, and a projected harvest little more than half the required minimum.

The O&C lands were once in private ownership. After the lands were taken back by the federal government, they were set aside by Congress to provide a permanent sustainable revenue source to the communities they border. The counties are legally entitled to 50% of the revenues generated from the sale of timber, and the revenue pays for all kinds of public services: mental and public health, sheriff patrols, jails, libraries, social and many others. Mismanagement of these forest lands since the early 1990's has decimated county budgets, reducing some as much as 80%. Several Oregon counties are on the brink of insolvency, and the inability to pay for public services has led to increasing crime rates and poverty.

This plan is the culmination of over two decades of ineffective management by the BLM, and it is a product of the failure to listen to, or cooperate with local governments, organizations, and citizens who live near or around these forests. OSSA fully supports the decision by Oregon counties to file a lawsuit to try and force the BLM to follow clear federal law.
Applications for Oregon Heritage Preservation Scholarship available
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/12/16 12:39 PM
The Oregon Heritage Preservation Scholarship provides financial assistance for Oregon residents to attend a preservation-related conference, workshop, or training in the United States between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017. Eligible travel expenses include registration fees, transportation, lodging and meals.

Scholarships will be offered to those actively involved in local preservation efforts and who demonstrate how attendance at a preservation-related conference, workshop, or training will help meet the preservation needs of their local community.

Scholarships are competitive and offered twice per year. The first round deadline is June 10, 2016 and is available for those to attend trainings between July 1, 2016 and December 31, 2016. The second round deadline is December 5, 2016 and is available for those to attend trainings between January 1, 2017 and June 30, 2017.

For more information and the application, visit www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/FINASST/Pages/Scholarships.aspx or contact Katie Henry at katie.henry@oregon.gov or (503) 986-0671.


Attached Media Files: News release
Deschutes County Farm Bureau announces scholarship winners
Oregon Farm Bureau - 05/12/16 8:47 AM
Deschutes County Farm Bureau is proud to announce the recipients of its 2016 scholarship program.

Three students were awarded $1,000 scholarships and one received a $1,500 scholarship.

Congratulations to Lauren Riback ($1,500), Christian Lisignoli ($1,000), Cody Nance ($1,000), and Andrew Stengel ($1,000). All students are from Deschutes County Farm Bureau member families.

Any student who applied for a scholarship this year can reapply next year. 2017 scholarship information will be posted at oregonfb.org/scholarships next year.

###

Note to Editors: "Farm Bureau" is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

The state's largest general farm organization, Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing the interests of the state's farmers and ranchers in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon in 1919, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties and has 7,000 member families that are professionally engaged in agriculture.

Deschutes County Farm Bureau represents 2,733 farm and ranch families.
Old Youngs Bay Bridge to close at 9 p.m. tonight for repair work
ODOT: Valley, No. Coast - 05/12/16 8:15 AM
The Old Youngs Bay Bridge will be closed tonight starting at 9 p.m. to do repair work on the center span locks. The bridge should re-open at 3 a.m. on Friday morning.

Variable message signs will be posted in various locations warning travelers of the closure. During the closure, travelers using U.S. 101 Business will detour using the Lewis and Clark River and New Youngs Bay Bridges.
Wed. 05/11/16
State Forest Stewardship Committee to meet May 19
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/11/16 5:03 PM
The State Forest Stewardship Coordinating Committee will meet May 19 in Salem to discuss the Forest Legacy Program and the Oregon Forest Management Planning System. Other items on the agenda include:

- Updates on the Community Forest Program
- Sustainable Family & Community Forestry
- Demonstration of the Biodiversity Explorer (a web-based application that provides data on species occurrences and/or modeled distributions for Oregon's important forest species and habitats)
- Update on post-fire restoration funding

The meeting will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters in the Tillamook Room - Building C, 2600 State St., in Salem. It is open to the public.

The State Forest Stewardship Coordinating Committee advises the State Forester on policies and procedures for U.S. Forest Service, State and Private Forestry Programs such as Forest Legacy and Forest Stewardship. The committee consists of representatives from state and federal natural resource agencies, private forest landowners, consulting foresters and forest industry and conservation organizations.

More information about the meeting can be obtained by calling the Oregon Department of Forestry, 503-945-7200.
Department of Revenue Pendleton office closed permanently
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 05/11/16 4:45 PM
SALEM, Ore.--The Oregon Department of Revenue's Pendleton satellite office has closed permanently due to the retirement of the office's only staff member.

"Closing this office reflects the ongoing challenges of operating satellite offices," said JoAnn Martin, administrator of the Personal Tax and Compliance Division. "We look forward to continuing to support taxpayers with our services online, by phone, and in our Bend field office," she said.

Taxpayers who used the satellite office's services are encouraged to contact the department's field office in Bend at (541) 388-6139, the main office in Salem toll-free at (800) 356-4222, or email questions.dor@oregon.gov for assistance.

There are also a number of self-service options available through the department's new web application, Revenue Online. With an account, taxpayers can view their account details, make payments, view letters from the department, and correspond securely with staff. Visit www.oregon.gov/dor for more information or to sign up for a Revenue Online account.

- 30 -
PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT - Information Regarding Fire Information and Evacuation Levels
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/11/16 4:11 PM
May 11, 2016

Released by:

Michael Ryan, Crook County Emergency Manager
Nathan Garibay, Deschutes County Emergency Manager
Mark Carman, Jefferson County Emergency Manager

As we enter fire season, the Sheriffs and Emergency Managers of Crook, Deschutes, and Jefferson counties and our partner agencies want to insure you understand the three level evacuation system and where to get current information regarding fire activity.

Level 1: Be Ready

There is an incident in your area and residents should be aware of potential evacuation. Be aware of the danger, monitor emergency services sources and local media for information. Those persons who will need additional time to exit an area or have health conditions (especially respiratory conditions that could be made worse by smoke) should consider leaving. You are encouraged to prepare or even move livestock and pets out of the area. Be prepared to leave if conditions worsen.

Level 2: Get Set

There is significant danger in your area and residents should be prepared to leave at a moment's notice. You are encouraged to leave and should do so as soon as possible. If you choose to stay, you should be able to leave immediately if conditions worsen. You MAY have time to gather necessary items, but doing so is at your own risk. Entry to evacuated areas may be denied until the hazard subsides.

This may be the only notice you receive. Emergency services cannot guarantee we will be able to notify you if conditions rapidly deteriorate.

Level 3: Go Now!

There is immediate and imminent danger and you should evacuate immediately. DO NOT delay leaving to gather any belongings or make efforts to protect your home. Leave immediately and as quickly as possible. Drive carefully, turn on your headlights, and follow any directions from emergency services personnel. Entry to evacuated areas will be denied until the hazard subsides.

Residents are encouraged to follow local media as well as the below sources of information to stay current on fire activity.

Current maps including evacuation areas in Deschutes County can be found at:

www.deschutes.org/emergency

For more information, you can visit the Central Oregon Fire Information site at:

http://centralorfireinfo.blogspot.com/

With this in mind, we urge you to take a look around your property in the "home ignition zone" where glowing embers can ignite spot fires and vulnerable areas like decks, patios and fences that can spread flames to your home. You can improve your home chance of survival by taking action before there's smoke on the horizon:

Create defensible space around your home
Are your gutters and roof valleys free from debris like pine needles and leaves? Clean them out. Despite a metal or asphalt shingle roof, the buildup of gutter debris provides necessary fuel for the glowing embers to ignite adjacent fascia boards or siding -- most often made of wood.
Do your shrubs and weeds provide a path of fuel for fire to reach your trees or home? Reduce shrubs and other "ladder fuels" for at least 30 ft around your home to reduce the threat of ground fires igniting nearby trees, or your home.
What can catch fire on your deck or patio or near your fence? Remove weeds, shrubs or any combustible materials from around, under or on top of your deck, patio or wood fence. This includes toys, planters, construction materials, patio furniture and cushions along with even small piles of pine needles or leaves.
Is your woodpile near your home or other combustible vegetation? Move woodpiles at least 20 feet away from your home or other combustibles.

For more information go to: www.firefree.org

We further encourage you and your family to have a plan, get a kit, and stay informed regarding known or potential hazards in your area.

For more information go to: www.redcross.org
June Veterans Advisory Committee Meeting in Klamath Falls
Oregon Deptartment of Veterans' Affairs - 05/11/16 3:22 PM
SALEM - The public is invited to attend and participate in the next quarterly meeting of the Advisory Committee to the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs. The meeting will be held at the Shilo Inn -- Klamath Falls, 2500 Almond St, Klamath Falls, OR 97601, on June 1, from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.

The nine-member committee is comprised of veterans appointed by the governor to provide counsel to the director of the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs.

The advisory committee's meetings are held throughout the state on the first Wednesday in March, June, September and December. Registration is not required, but is encouraged. RSVP online at: www.surveymonkey.com/r/June2016AC

More information can be found online at www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/advisory.aspx or to contact the Advisory Committee, please email vaac@odva.state.or.us.
Oregon Food Bank sets $10 daily admission for 2016 Waterfront Blues Festival (Photo)
Oregon Food Bank - 05/11/16 9:00 AM
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At just $10 per day, the 29th annual Waterfront Blues Festival is the best entertainment value around; 120 musical performances on 4 stages over 4 days on the waterfront in the heart of Portland... all for a good cause.

For almost 30 years, Oregon Food Bank has brought great blues music to Portland to help alleviate hunger. What started as a much smaller effort has grown into a world-class four-day music experience. Oregon Food Bank is more than the beneficiary of the Waterfront Blues Festival; it owns and operates the event. A lot has changed since the Blues Fest began in 1988, most notably the sheer cost of operating the festival including musical talent and security. "The $10 required daily admission will help to ensure that Oregon Food Bank is able to fulfill its mission -- to eliminate hunger and its root causes...because no one should be hungry -- while sustaining a safe, fantastic musical tradition," says Oregon Food Bank CEO Susannah Morgan.

The 2016 Safeway Waterfront Blues Festival takes place July 1-4 at Tom McCall Waterfront Park. Children six and under are free, and a limited number of passes will be made available each day for Oregon Trail Card holders. Single day passes go on sale June 1 at TicketTomato.com.

About Waterfront Blues Fest:
Since 1988, Oregon Food Bank has produced the Waterfront Blues Fest to raise funds and awareness to fight hunger in Oregon and Clark County, Washington. As Oregon Food Bank's largest annual fundraising event, this Portland flagship festival has become a treasured tradition for locals and visitors alike; it is the largest blues festival west of the Mississippi and the second-largest blues festival in the nation. Since its inception, the festival has raised close to $10 million to fight hunger in the region.

Major sponsors: Safeway Albertsons, First Tech Federal Credit Union, Buick GMC of Beaverton, FedEx, iQ Credit Union, KINK.fm, KOIN 6, and The Oregonian.

Supporting sponsors: Schwindt & Co., Clackamas County and Health Net.

More information: waterfrontbluesfest.com | oregonfoodbank.org


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/620/94341/WBF_logo_2016.jpg
Tue. 05/10/16
Public Health Advisory Board Funding and Incentives Subcommittee meets May 17 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 05/10/16 3:53 PM
May 10, 2016

What: A public meeting of the Funding and Incentives Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Review the subcommittee's work plan; provide guidance to OHA on development of a funding formula.

When: Tuesday, May 17, 2-3 p.m. A 10-minute public comment period is scheduled at 2:50 p.m. Comments are limited to three minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 918, 800 NE Oregon St. The public also can listen via a conference call line at 1-877-873-8017, access code 767068#.

Oregon's Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon's governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon's State Health Improvement Plan. The Funding and Incentives Subcommittee develops recommendations for consideration by the Public Health Advisory Board.

For more information, contact Cara Biddlecom, 971-673-2284 or cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, or visit the board's website at http://public.health.oregon.gov/About/Pages/ophab.aspx.

# # #
Governor's Commission on Senior Services - Executive Committee will meet Thursday, May 26 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/10/16 2:40 PM
The Governor's Commission on Senior Services - Executive Committee is planning to meet Thursday, May 26 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, 500 Summer St. NE, Room 165, Salem.

This meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes: announcements; upcoming events; public comment; commission appointments; and the creation of an agenda for the Thursday, June 9 full commission meeting.
People also can call into the meeting: 1-888-363-4735; participant code: 3439085.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Rebecca Arce at Rebecca.E.Arce@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the event.
For questions about this meeting, please contact: Rebecca Arce, policy analyst at 503-947-5019 or Rebecca.E.Arce@state.or.us.

# # #
Methamphetamine arrest near Sisters
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/10/16 2:14 PM
Released by: Sgt. Deke Demars, Detective Division, Street Crimes Unit

Date of incident: 5/10/16

Time: 4:00 a.m.

Location: Highway 20 West, west of Sisters, Oregon

Arrested Person: Worden, James age:66
La Pine, Oregon (Klamath County)

Charges: Unlawful Manufacture of Methamphetamine, bail $15,000.00
Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine, bail $15,000.00
Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine, bail $15,000.00



On 5/10/16, Detectives with the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Street Crimes Unit developed information that James Worden would be traveling from the Willamette Valley area to Deschutes County with a street level shipment of methamphetamine, which he planned to sell within Deschutes County.

With the assistance of the CODE team (Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team), Deputies stopped Worden at 4:00 a.m. on 5/10/16 on Highway 20, outside Sisters.

Worden was found to be in possession of methamphetamine consistent with amounts that would be delivered to smaller user quantity dealers, along with packaging materials and digital scales.

Worden was arrested and lodged at the Deschutes County Adult Jail on the following charges: Unlawful Manufacture of Methamphetamine, bail $15,000.00, Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine, bail $15,000.00 and Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine, bail $15,000.00.

Worden resides in the rural Lapine area of Klamath county.

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Street Crimes Unit focuses enforcement on street level drug cases and quality of life issues connected to property crimes, such as theft and burglaries throughout Deschutes County.
Public Health Advisory Board's Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets May 12 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 05/10/16 2:10 PM
May 9, 2016

What: A public meeting of the Accountability Metrics Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Review the scope of the subcommittee; conduct organizational business; develop timeline for completion of deliverables in accordance with House Bill 3100.

When: Tuesday, May 12, 8-9 a.m. A 10-minute public comment period is scheduled at 8:50 a.m. Comments are limited to three minutes.

Where: By conference call. The public can join by calling 1-877-848-7030, access code 2030826#.

The Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon's governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon's State Health Improvement Plan. The Accountability Metrics Subcommittee develops recommendations for consideration by the Public Health Advisory Board.

For more information, contact Cara Biddlecom, 971-673-2284; cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, or visit the board's website at http://public.health.oregon.gov/About/Pages/ophab.aspx.

# # #
Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee to meet Friday, May 20 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/10/16 11:31 AM
The Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee is planning to meet Friday, May 20 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 473, 500 Summer St. NE, Salem.

The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes regular committee business, executive committee elections, discussion of interpreter services, planning for leadership training, subcommittee updates, community development brainstorming, and follow-up on goals discussed at last month's retreat.

Interested people can also call in to the meeting: 1-888-808-6929; participant code: 4517555.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Rebecca Arce, policy analyst, at: 503-947-5019; Rebecca.E.Arce@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the event.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Theresa.A.Powell@state.or.us, policy analyst.
Oregon Home Care Commission expands caregiver Registry, Homecare Choice Program offers new in-home care service
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/10/16 10:01 AM
SALEM, Ore. -- The Oregon Home Care Commission (OHCC) today unveiled a new service that connects people needing in-home care with caregivers. The Homecare Choice Program provides consumers with access to the OHCC's online Registry of homecare and personal support workers who have been background checked and trained.

This state-run registry is the first of its kind in the nation because it serves all populations, not just people who have state-funded plans. Previously, the OHCC's Registry primarily served Oregonians receiving in-home care through Medicaid and Oregon Project Independence. As the 65+ population continues to grow, more seniors and people with disabilities will require in-home care. The Oregon Office of Economic Analysis estimates the number of residents age 65 and over will reach nearly 796,000 by 2020.

The Homecare Choice Program is available to people of all ages and ability levels who need support to stay at home. The Registry can be accessed 24 hours, 7 days per week and the hiring process includes doing self-assessment, choosing the services needed, and selecting and interviewing a pre-qualified caregiver. From there, consumers sign a written service plan, set their schedules and supervise the caregivers in their homes.

Services available through the program include assistance with personal care, household tasks, companionship, meal preparation, pet care, running errands and medication.

"We are thrilled about expanding our existing homecare Registry for everyone to use," says Cheryl Miller, Executive Director of the OHCC. "The Homecare Choice Program simplifies the process of finding and hiring a safe, qualified caregiver. It also helps people handle the legal requirements, such as payroll and taxes, which lifts a burden of responsibility off of them."

The Homecare Choice Program was created by the Oregon Legislature in 2014 (SB 1542) to meet the growing demand of those needing in-home care by allowing private pay consumers to purchase homecare services from the OHCC through its Registry. The Homecare Choice Program is managed by the OHCC, which is a semi-independent state agency responsible for ensuring the high quality of homecare services for seniors and people with disabilities that are funded by the Department of Human Services. The OHCC has managed a successful, functioning Registry of homecare and personal support workers in all 36 counties across Oregon since 2008 that serves people receiving in-home care through Medicaid-funded plans and Oregon Project Independence.

For more information about the program, visit www.HomecareChoiceOregon.com, email homecare.choice@state.or.us or call 1-844-494-4227.

NOTE
Interview availability: 10-11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, May 10
Cheryl Miller, Executive Director of the Oregon Home Care Commission
Jenny Cokeley, Homecare Choice Program Manager
Mike McCormick, Deputy Director of Aging and People with Disabilities
Mon. 05/09/16
Crash Involving Commercial Vehicle Hauling Chocolate Snarls I-5 Traffic - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/09/16 8:58 PM
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On May 9, 2016 at about 4:23PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a semi-truck and trailer roll over on Interstate 5 northbound near milepost 191.5 (just south of Eugene).

Initial investigation revealed a 2015 Volvo tractor towing a box trailer (loaded with chocolate ) was traveling northbound on Interstate 5 when it drifted off the right shoulder striking the guardrail. The truck damaged over 300 feet of guardrail before rolling over and blocking the fast lane of Interstate 5.

The driver, Robert K CASADOS, age 24, of Anderson, California was not injured in the crash. Both northbound lanes of Interstate 5 were closed for about 30 minutes. The slow lane was then opened for traffic to pass. The highway was completely cleared of the wreckage about four hours after the crash.

CASADOS was cited for Failure to Drive Within Lane (violation). OSP was assisted by the Oregon Department of Transportation, Northwest Hazmat, and Eugene Springfield Fire.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1002/94309/I5_mp_191.jpg
Minor Injury Rollover Motor Vehicle Crash (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/09/16 8:30 PM
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Released by: Sgt. K. Dizney 541-693-6911

Location: Intersection of Almeter Avenue at Sedgewick Avenue

Vehicle 1: 2003 Red Chevy Blazer

Driver 1: Erickson, Isaac Age: 20
Terrebonne, OR

NARRATIVE:

On Monday, May 09, 2016, at approximately 5:37PM, Deputies from the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office were dispatched to a reported rollover motor vehicle crash at this location. Responding deputies discovered the mentioned vehicle on its top in the northbound lane of travel on Almeter Avenue at the curve turning into eastbound travel for Sedgewick Avenue.

Deputies determined the driver, Isaac Erickson, was traveling northbound through a series of sharp curves on Almeter Avenue. Erickson lost control, overcorrected, and rolled onto his roof. Witnesses to the crash describe Erickson's speed to be normal for the conditions, and no indications of drug or alcohol use were discovered. Erickson denied being distracted by any means and said he felt he just overcorrected after getting too close to the edge of the roadway.

No other vehicles or property were involved.

###


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/5227/94308/IMG_0214.JPG , 2016-05/5227/94308/IMG_0215.JPG
Man Killed In Highway 22 Crash East Of Salem - Marion County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/09/16 3:00 PM
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On May 9, 2016 at about 5:50AM, OSP received the report of an eastbound vehicle which could not stay within it's lane of travel on Highway 22 near milepost 19. The caller reported the vehicle was crossing over the centerline and the back into it's lane of travel. At approximately 5:54AM, OSP received another call that the vehicle of concern had been involved in a head-on crash on Highway 22 near milepost 20 (just west of Lyons).

Preliminary investigation revealed the vehicle of concern, a 1997 Acura coupe, crossed the centerline and struck a westbound 2000 Chevrolet Blazer head-on. The driver of the Acura, Richard J BEALS, age 21, of Lyons was pronounced deceased on scene.

The driver of the Chevrolet, Jessica M LEMMER, age 36, of Mill City, received serious injuries and was taken to Salem Hospital and then to Oregon Health and Science University by air ambulance. LEMMER's passenger, Kaitlin MERCER, age 21, of Mill City, was taken to Stayton Hospital for non-life threatening injuries.

Highway 22 was closed for 3 hours with a detour established by the Oregon Department of Transportation. OSP was assisted by Marion County Sheriff's Office, ODOT, Stayton Fire and Lyons Fire and Rescue.

More information will be released as it becomes available as this is an ongoing investigation.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1002/94296/22_mp20.jpg
The Legal Requirements of Boating (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 05/09/16 1:35 PM
Lincoln County marine patrol boat
Lincoln County marine patrol boat
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In Oregon, boaters must have a certificate of title, certificate of number, and validation stickers to operate a motorboat of any length or sailboat longer than 12 feet legally on public waterways. This includes boats that are documented with a recreational endorsement by the U.S. Coast Guard and principally used or moored in Oregon.

Documented boats that have a recreational endorsement do not have an Oregon certificate of title and do not need to display an OR number but are required to register and display a current validation sticker on both sides of the aftermost part of the hull in the upper, square foot, below the deck line. All other recreational boats moored in Oregon are required to have current validation sticker.

The certificate of number, commonly called the "registration card," is a pocket-sized card that must be on board and available for inspection by an enforcement officer whenever the boat is being operated.

The registration number is specific to the boat and is issued with the title and registration. The registration number (OR#) and validation sticker (decal) must be displayed on the starboard and port side bow of the boat. Once a number is issued, it can be painted, applied as a decal sticker, or otherwise affixed to the bow and placed above the water line so it can be read easily. Numbers are read from left to right on both sides of the bow and must be in 3-inch high block letters (not slanted) and separated by at least 2 inches. Letters must be in a contrasting color to the boat's hull color or striping.

The validation sticker (decal -good for two calendar years) must be affixed on each side of the boat and placed in line. The sticker on the port side is after the OR number and on the starboard side, before the OR number (see illustration). The decal expires on December 31 of the year indicated on the sticker.

The certificate of title, certificate of number and validation stickers (decals) can be obtained by completing an application and submitting the proper fee with documentation to the Oregon State Marine Board. Many boat dealers will submit the documents on your behalf for an agent fee.

Obtaining a title and certificate of number can take anywhere from a month to four months, depending on the boat dealer or other documents that may be needed to complete the transaction.

Failure to have a certificate of registration for documented vessels is a B violation and a $260 fine. Failure for a boat operator to carry a certificate of number is a D violation and a $$110 fine. Boaters can also be cited with failure to obtain a title, a D violation with $110 fine.

To learn more about this topic and other legal requirements of boating, visit http://www.boatoregon.com/.
###


Attached Media Files: Lincoln County marine patrol boat , OR number spacing and placement , Location for decal placement for documented vessels
OHA continues assessments of long-term risks near Bullseye, Uroboros
Oregon Health Authority - 05/09/16 1:09 PM
May 9, 2016

Agency is forming community advisory committees to inform health assessments

PORTLAND--The Oregon Health Authority's Environmental Health Assessment Program (EHAP) has begun work on Public Health Assessments (PHAs) in response to significant community concerns about health risks from past, present and future exposures to heavy metals emitted by glass manufacturers.

The program will use the standard public health assessment process from the Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry's (ATSDR). PHAs assess health risks based on available environmental data. The Bullseye Glass Co. and Uroboros Glass assessments will be based on soil and air data collected near both facilities. PHAs are not community health studies and will not determine whether existing health issues are caused by environmental exposures.

"We welcome community members as partners in our work," said Julie Early Sifuentes, EHAP program manager. "We understand that meaningful engagement in the process by those most affected by this issue allows for concerns to be adequately addressed, builds community capacity, establishes transparency and creates better outcomes."

The program is convening a series of meetings focused on the long-term health risk assessment for the communities living near the two glass manufacturing sites. OHA will be recruiting interested community members who are willing and able to participate in a community advisory committee for each site.

The purposes of community advisory committees are to:
1. Receive input and feedback from local residents into exposure assumptions and recommendations.
2. Educate participants about the PHA process and build capacity in environmental health.
3. Develop relationships with local residents, and establish transparency in the long-term public health assessment process.
4. Identify the most relevant ways of communicating to the broader community about the PHA process, and about the conclusions and recommendations.
5. Ensure that community concerns are highlighted, incorporated and addressed through the PHA process.

The PHA process will require participation in three to five advisory committee meetings for each site. Each meeting will be about two hours long. Advisors may want to spend time between meetings reading, relaying information to others, or other activities, but the commitment OHA is asking for is to attend all meetings and stay engaged in the process through its final stages.

EHAP is seeking:
Seven to 10 volunteers who live, work, learn or play within a half-mile of Bullseye or Uroboros glass facilities.
Individuals who can commit to attending every meeting.
A diversity of experience and perspectives.
Individuals who are at greatest risk from the effects of environmental contamination, including pregnant and nursing women, parents or guardians of children, minorities, the elderly, those who are low-income, and those with existing health conditions.

Community members interested in participating in either advisory group can call 971-673-0970 or email Ehap.info@state.or.us by May 17.

# # #
Create a circle of safety around your home
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/09/16 12:40 PM
Before summer arrives, create a circle of safety around your home to protect it from wildfire. May is Oregon Wildfire Awareness Month, and the Oregon Department of Forestry, Keep Oregon Green Association, Oregon State Fire Marshal and fire educators statewide are spreading the word on ways to help prevent human-caused wildfires, as well as how to protect a home in case a fire encroaches.

"In a large fire event, firefighters may not have the capacity or resources to defend every house. Just as you lock the doors to keep your home and family safe, think of creating a fuel-free defensible space, a 'circle of safety,' around your home to reduce fire danger and provide safe access to firefighters so they can protect it," said Kristin Babbs, president of Keep Oregon Green.

The main culprits are a wildfire's hot embers. They can waft through the air a mile or more ahead of the actual flame front and come to rest in leaves and needles accumulated on the roof, or in flammable plants in the landscaping. In a matter of minutes the embers can ignite the surrounding fuel. In some instances, house fires started by embers on the roof and in rain gutters have smoldered without smoke for days, creeping into the roof's underlayment, before bursting into open flames.

"You can't control where these embers land, but you can control what happens when they do," she said.

CLEAN UP TO REDUCE WILDFIRE THREAT
To create a circle of safety around your property, start with the house and the first 30 feet extending from the outermost part of the structure, including detached garages and sheds. The roof is the most vulnerable part of the home. Regularly clear leaves and needles from the roof and gutters, and cut back any tree limbs that overhang the roof.

LANDSCAPE PROPERTY TO HALT GROUND FIRE
Landscaping should consist of low-growing, fire-resistant plants that are spaced carefully so as not to draw a fire to the structure with surrounding fuel. Rake leaves and debris from the yard, mow grass, prune trees six to 10 feet up from the ground, and keep plants well-watered to prevent a surface fire from climbing into the tree crowns and carrying flames to the house. Properly placed deciduous trees can actually protect a home by blocking a wildfire's intense heat.

Fuel breaks, such as driveways, gravel walkways, and green lawns can halt the advance of a fire by starving it of fuel.

In the zone 100 to 200 feet from the home, trees may need to be thinned, though less intensively than those closer in, so that canopies are not touching.

It is not inevitable that a wildfire will consume everything in its path. The more defensible-space work a homeowner can accomplish before fire season, the better a home's chances of surviving a wildfire.

"It's peace of mind knowing that if you leave your home for a stretch of time this summer, it will still be standing when you return," She said.

More tips on how to create defensible space around your home and protect it from wildfire can be found at: www.firewise.org and www.keeporegongreen.org

Other Wildfire Awareness Month tips coming soon:
During May also watch for fire prevention tips on backyard debris burning and campfires.
Pendleton to host Blue Mountain safety conference
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 05/09/16 12:22 PM
(Salem) -- A two-day event in Pendleton will offer employers and workers everything from workshops and training opportunities to a forklift challenge and a keynote presentation on building a robust safety culture -- all with the goal of boosting workplace safety and health.

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, is one of several partners presenting the June 6-7 Blue Mountain Occupational Safety and Health Conference at the Pendleton Convention Center.

On Tuesday, June 7, keynote speaker Greg Anderson, a leading expert in providing behavior-based safety and leadership training for companies across the globe, will present "Safety 24/7." His presentation will show how companies can reduce injury and illness rates by focusing on changing personal and organizational beliefs. Such changes can create significant and positive changes in behaviors.

"I hope people recognize this conference is not just for safety experts," Anderson said. "The leadership skills necessary to motivate a person to work safely are the same skills people use to achieve operational performance."

Other conference topics include:
Safety and health hazards of welding
Controlling hazardous energy
Respiratory protection
Machine guarding: rules, standards, and manufacturers

The event also will include a Forklift Round-Up on June 6, and exhibits showcasing the latest in safety and health products and services. Conference registration is $70, which includes lunch. The cost to compete in the Forklift Round-Up is $50. For more information about the two-day event or to register, go to www.regonline.com/blue_mountain16, call Oregon OSHA's Conference Section at 503-947-7411 or 888-292-5247 (toll-free), or send an email to Oregon.conferences@oregon.gov.

The event is a joint effort of the Oregon SHARP Alliance (Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program), Oregon OSHA, and a coalition of employers and employees from northeast Oregon.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.orosha.org.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.
Oregon.gov advisory board meets Wednesday
State of Oregon - 05/09/16 10:28 AM
Salem, Oregon-The Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board will meet at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, May 11. The meeting will take place in the Tillamook Room of the Department of Forestry, 2600 State St Bldg. C, Salem, Oregon.

The board meeting is open to the public and comment will be taken from those attending in person and via the internet. For instructions, virtual meeting links and teleconference number, please see the linked document: (http://www.oregon.gov/epab/Documents/EPAB_Internet_Public_Attendee_Instructions.pdf )

The legislature established the advisory board with enactment of ORS 182.126-132. The board advises the Department of Administrative Services on key decisions and strategic choices about how DAS manages and operates the state's web portal services.

The Oregon.gov portal is the connection point for citizens to access state agency services and information on the Internet. "Web portal services" means providing the hosting, content management, electronic commerce, public collaboration and application development needed to operate and maintain Oregon.gov and make payments on the web.

With the board's advice, DAS aims to make the Oregon.gov portal and its operation as effective as it can be for citizens' interface with state government.

The agenda and handouts were posted on the advisory boards' website, seven days prior to meeting: (http://www.oregon.gov/epab/Pages/agenda_minutes_handouts.aspx)

What: Meeting of the Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board.

When: Wednesday, May 11, 2016, 9:00am - 11:30am.

Where: Department of Forestry
Tillamook Conference Room
2600 State St., Bldg. C
Salem, Oregon 97310

Who: Members of the Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board
Oregon again strongly supports equal access to abortion
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 05/09/16 10:21 AM
PRO-CHOICE COALITION OF OREGON PRESS RELEASE

The Pro-Choice Coalition of Oregon today celebrated Oregon Life United's failure to place an extreme anti-abortion constitutional amendment on the November 2016 ballot.

Sponsored by Jeff Jimerson, former State Senator Marilyn Shannon and Suzanne Belatti, Initiative Petition 61 would have embedded in the Oregon Constitution a definition of abortion that includes some commonly used forms of contraception, and would have created unequal access to safe, legal abortion by prohibiting the use of so-called "public dollars" to pay in any way for abortion or certain contraceptives through the Oregon Health Plan or private insurance policies for employees of the state, school districts, cities, counties or any "public" entity.

"Oregon voters remain strongly supportive of equal access to safe, affordable reproductive health care, including abortion," said Michele Stranger-Hunter, Executive Director of NARAL Pro-Choice Oregon.

Stacy Cross, President and CEO of Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette and lead petitioner on objections filed with the Attorney General and the Oregon Supreme Court over the proposed ballot title, said: "When a woman is living paycheck to paycheck, denying coverage for an abortion can push her deeper into poverty. Studies show that a woman who seeks an abortion but is denied is more likely to fall into poverty than one who is able to get a safe abortion."

Kimberly McCullough, Policy Director of ACLU of Oregon, also filed comments with the Supreme Court. She noted, "Today, the sponsors of this dangerous effort seemed to admit that they faced a difficult, if not impossible, challenge to convince voters to take away healthcare rights from Oregonians."

Kara Carmosino of the Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon, another plaintiff, added: "Limitations on abortion can have profoundly harmful effects on public health, particularly for those who already face significant barriers to receiving high-quality care, such as low-income women, immigrant women, young women, women of color and LGBTQ people."

This marks the third consecutive failure by Jimerson and Shannon to bring this measure to Oregon voters. They have never been able to collect enough signatures to even warrant having the Elections Division of the Secretary of State's office undertake a verification process.

The only times measures proposing to limit funding for abortion in Oregon have been on the ballot, in 1978 and again in 1986, Oregon voters soundly defeated them.
LaPine Woman Injured In Fiery Crash On Highway 58 - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/09/16 9:27 AM
2016-05/1002/94272/lowell_crash.jpg
2016-05/1002/94272/lowell_crash.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1002/94272/thumb_lowell_crash.jpg
On May 9th, 2016 at about 6:45AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Highway 58 near milepost 19 (east of Lowell).

Preliminary investigation reveals a 1995 GMC sport utility was traveling eastbound when it departed the highway and rolled over multiple times. The vehicle caught fire and the driver, Jessie L SHADER, age 24, of LaPine, was able to exit the vehicle before it became fully engulfed.

SHADER was transported to McKenzie Willamette Emergency Room for minor injuries sustained in the crash. OSP was assisted on scene by Oakridge Fire and Rescue, the Oregon Department of Transportation and Union Pacific.

More information will be released when available as the investigation is continuing.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1002/94272/lowell_crash.jpg
Sun. 05/08/16
Updated Telephone Scam Information.
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/08/16 2:37 PM
Sgt. Vance Lawrence Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

There are still active telephone scammers working the Central Oregon area saying they are calling from the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office or other local law enforcement agency.

Most recently victims are instructed to go to Fred Meyer, Wal Mart has also been used in the past, and purchase some type of loadable charge card or debit card, then load that card with a specified amount of money.

The suspect will then instruct the victim to give them the card number over the phone. The suspect using the number alone can withdraw all the money attached to that card almost immediately. The money is generally taken by someone outside of the United States and it is not recoverable by law enforcement.

This is another reminder that NO LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY WILL CALL YOU ON THE TELEPHONE AND ASK FOR MONEY OR INSTRUCT ANYONE TO LOAD A CREDIT/DEBIT CARD FOR THEM. IF YOU RECEIVE ANY PHONE CALLS REGARDING THIS ISSUE OR HAVE ANY QUESTIONS CALL OUR DISPATCH CENTER (541-693-6911) PRIOR TO FOLLOWING ANY INSTRUCTIONS REGARDING THIS TYPE OF ACTIVITY.
Photos- I-5 crash involving wrong way driver and semi carrying Hydrochloric acid (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 05/08/16 8:20 AM
2016-05/1202/94261/I-5_MP_66_Truck_Crash_May8_2016.jpg
2016-05/1202/94261/I-5_MP_66_Truck_Crash_May8_2016.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1202/94261/thumb_I-5_MP_66_Truck_Crash_May8_2016.jpg
Interstate 5 (Pacific Highway) MP 66.8, northbound, north of Grants Pass: The southbound lanes have reopened to traffic. A single northbound lane is open.

All lanes of I-5 were closed about 2:45 a.m. after a northbound semi carrying hydrochloric acid crashed and began leaking its contents, after trying to avoid a wrong way driver.

Hazmat crews were called from Medford to assess and stopped a small leak.
Crew are still on scene, working to get the northbound fast lane open.

Calls regarding the crash report, injuries and any citations should go to Oregon State Police.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1202/94261/I-5_MP_66_Truck_Crash_May8_2016.jpg , 2016-05/1202/94261/I5_Truck_Crash_near_MP_66_Hugo_May_8_2016_looking_south.jpg , 2016-05/1202/94261/I_5_TruckCrash_near_MP_66_May_8_2016.jpg
Sat. 05/07/16
Stolen Motorcycle Recovered in La Pine
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/07/16 3:23 PM
MEDIA RELEASE

Stolen Motorcycle Recovered; Arrest

Released by: Sgt. William Bailey

Occurred: 05/07/2016 at 0130 hours

Location: 52000 block of Lucky Lane, La Pine

Name: Christopher J. Campbell
La Pine
33 years old

Charges: Unlawful Use of a Motor Vehicle
Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine


NARRATIVE:

On May 05, 2016, Deputies with the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office were dispatched to a report of a stolen motorcycle that had been taken from a carport in the area of Jackpine Road and Ash Road in La Pine. It was reported that the motorcycle had been taken within the previous 72 hours.

With the assistance of the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) Team, the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Street Crimes Unit detectives developed information that Christopher J. Campbell was in possession of the stolen motorcycle at a residence in the 52000 block of Lucky Lane, La Pine. Detectives applied for and were granted a search warrant for this location.

On May 07, 2016, deputies and detectives executed the search warrant and located the stolen motorcycle inside Campbell's residence.

Campbell was taken into custody and transported to the Deschutes County Adult Jail, where he was lodged on charges of Unlawful Use of a Motor Vehicle and Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine.

This investigation is ongoing.
Fatal Motor Vehicle Crash (Powell Butte Highway Near Bend Airport)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/07/16 12:05 PM
Released by: Sgt. Kevin Dizney (541) 693-6911

Location: Powell Butte Highway east of McGrath and before the weigh scales.

Vehicle 1: Gold 2003 Chevrolet Trailblazer SUV

Driver 1: Goodew, Samantha Age: 25
Powell Butte, OR


NARRATIVE:

On Saturday, May 07, 2016, at approximately 04:47 AM, deputies with the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office responded to a report of a motor vehicle crash on Powell Butte Highway between McGrath Road and the weigh scales near the Bend Airport. The crash was reported to involve a single vehicle that was reported to be on its top approximately 15-20 yards off the roadway. A single vehicle occupant, later identified as Samantha Goodew, was unresponsive inside the vehicle.

Deputies responded and discovered the SUV, identified as a Gold 2003 Chevrolet Trailblazer, had sustained extensive structural damage involving numerous rolls from the crash. Deputies determined Goodew was deceased at this time. It is unknown when the crash occurred. Deputies have learned Goodew worked in Bend and was likely on her way home between 0300 0400 AM. Deputies are working now to identify Goodew's beginning point of origin driving, her destination, and what may have contributed to the cause of this crash. Speed, distracted driving, animals, drugs and/or alcohol are still being investigated as possible contributors.

The sheriff's office was assisted at the scene by the Oregon State Police, Bend Fire Department, and Deschutes County Road Department for roadway closure. The highway was closed for approximately 1.5 hours to clear the roadway of debris and conduct the investigation. Traffic was rerouted around the crash area. Photographs of this scene are not available.


###
Motor Vehicle Crash/ DUII Arrest
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/07/16 9:51 AM
Motor Vehicle Crash/ DUII Arrest

Released by: Lt. Tim Leak, 541-388-6655

Location: FS 4601 off Skyliners Road

Vehicle 1: 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee

Driver 1: Jordan Neelon Age: 19
Bend

Citations: Arrested for DUII, Reckless Endangering, Assault III

NARRATIVE:

On May 7th, 2016 at approx. 4:00 am Deputies from the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office along with medics from Bend Fire Department responded to an injury motor vehicle crash on FS 4601 off of Skyliners Road in Bend.
On arrival deputies learned through their investigation that the Jeep Grand Cherokee being driven by Neelon was traveling down FS 4601 near Tumalo Falls at a high rate of speed. Neelon lost control of his vehicle on the gravel road and struck a tree near the roadway.
Four passengers in Neelon's vehicle were transported to St. Charles Medical Center in Bend with non-life threatening injuries. At the conclusion of the crash investigation Neelon was arrested for DUII, Reckless Endangering, and Assault III. Neelon was lodged at the Deschutes County Adult Jail.
Alcohol and speed were contributing factors in this motor vehicle crash.
Fri. 05/06/16
FBI Arrests Michael Emry on Weapons Charges
FBI - Oregon - 05/06/16 10:15 PM
FBI Agents, working with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), the John Day Police Department and Oregon State Police, arrested Michael Ray Emry, age 54, on Friday, May 6, 2016. The probable cause arrest was made after agents and officers served a federal search warrant on Emry's home in John Day, Oregon. The arrest was without incident.

A federal criminal complaint filed the evening of May 6th charges Emry with two counts:

+++ Unlawful Possession of a Machine Gun not registered to him in the National Firearms Registration and Transfer Record
+++ Unlawful Possession of a Firearm with an Obliterated Serial Number

Emry is currently being held in the Deschutes County Jail awaiting transfer to Eugene on Monday, May 9th where he will make his initial appearance before a federal magistrate.

Assistant United States Attorney Nathan Lichvarcik is prosecuting this case. All defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty.

###


Attached Media Files: Emry Arrest Warrant & Criminal Complaint - May 6, 2016
Stolen Vehicle/ Pursuit/ Arrest
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/06/16 4:28 PM
Stolen Vehicle/Pursuit/Arrest

Released by: Lt. Tim Leak, 541-388-6655

Occurred: May 6th, 2016, 11:30 am

Location: US Hwy 97 near Prairie Drive

Name: Kyle K. Martin
Lowell, Oregon
24

Charges: Attempt to Elude/ Felony Bail 10,000
Attempt to Elude/Misdemeanor Bail 5,000
Unauthorized Use of a Motor Vehicle Bail 10,000
Lane County Circuit Court Warrant Bail 50,000
Linn County Circuit Court Warrant Bail 1,890.00


NARRATIVE:

On May 6th, 2016 at approx. 1130 am Deschutes County Dispatch received a call regarding a traffic complaint southbound on Hwy 97 near MP 149. The complaint initially was concerning a possible intoxicated driver southbound on the highway. Dispatch checked the license plate given on the traffic complaint and found that the vehicle was reported stolen this morning out of Lebanon, Oregon. The vehicle was described as a black Ford pickup with a canopy.
Deputies from the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office located the vehicle on Hwy 97 just north of La Pine and attempted to stop the vehicle near the intersection of Hwy 97 and Prairie Dr. The stolen vehicle failed to stop for deputies and a pursuit of approx. one (1) mile ensued. The pursuit ended, near the intersection of Huntington Rd and Prairie Dr, when the stolen vehicle left the roadway, traveling cross country, and came to a stop next to the Burlington Northern railroad tracks.
Both the driver and passenger fled the vehicle on foot. After a short foot chase the passenger was caught by deputies. Additional deputies assisted by the Oregon State Police, Sunriver Police, and United States Forest Service Law Enforcement quickly set up a perimeter around the area and requested a K-9 to conduct a search of the area for the driver of the stolen vehicle. Deschutes County K-9 Zeus arrived at the location and after a short search located the driver of the stolen vehicle hiding within a large pile of cut trees stacked along the east side of the railroad tracks.
The driver of the stolen vehicle, Martin, was taken into custody without incident and lodged at the Deschutes County Adult Jail on the above listed charges.
Forestry Board panel on federal forests to reconvene in Salem on May 9, discuss future work and priorities
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/06/16 1:16 PM
The Oregon Board of Forestry's Subcommittee on Federal Forests will reconvene on May 9 to discuss next steps as it works to support an increase in pace, scale and quality of restoration and management of federal forests in Oregon.

The subcommittee meeting will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Clatsop Room of the Administration Building at the Oregon Department of Forestry's Salem headquarters, 2600 State St. Members of the subcommittee may attend by conference call; the public is invited to attend in person.

Oregon has 30 million acres of forestland, of which more than 18 million acres are federally-owned. The subcommittee was formed in January 2013 to explore means of ongoing board engagement in federal forest management issues, in concert with Governor Kate Brown and other public policy leaders.

>About the board
The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the state forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon's 30 million-acre forestland base.

More information about the board is available at: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/AboutBOF.aspx

###
The Pacific Northwest Collects 16 Tons At The Latest DEA National Drug Take-Back Day
DEA Seattle - 05/06/16 12:52 PM
Residents of the Pacific Northwest (PNW) responded overwhelmingly to the most recent DEA National Prescription Drug Take Back Day. On April 30, 2016, in a four hour period, residents of Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska combined, turned in 31,872 pounds (16 tons) of unwanted or expired medications for safe and proper disposal at the 168 take-back sites.

"In a time when opioid abuse has increased so dramatically nationwide, our communities of the Northwest really rose to the challenge by safely removing significant amounts of unused pharmaceutical drugs from unintended circulation," said DEA Special Agent in Charge Keith Weis.

When the results of the 11 DEA Take Back Days for the PNW are combined, the DEA and its state, local, and tribal law-enforcement and community partners have removed over 300,328 pounds (150.2 tons) of medication from circulation.

The following are the results broken down by state:

Washington -- 13,800 pounds (6.9 tons) removed from circulation.
Idaho -- 3,068 pounds (1.5 tons) removed from circulation.
Oregon -- 10,842 pounds (5.4 tons) removed from circulation.
Alaska -- 4162 pounds (2.1 tons) removed from circulation.

Nationwide, DEA and over 4,200 of its state, local, and tribal law enforcement partners collected 893,498 pounds of unwanted medicines--about 447 tons--at almost 5,400 sites spread through all 50 states, beating its previous high of 390 tons in the spring of 2014 by 57 tons, or more than 114,000 pounds.

The majority of prescription drug abusers report in surveys that they get their drugs from friends and family. Americans understand that cleaning out old prescription drugs from medicine cabinets, kitchen drawers, and bedside tables reduces accidents, thefts, and the misuse and abuse of these medicines, including the opioid painkillers that accounted for 20,808 drug overdoses--78 a day--in 2014 (the most recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). Eight out of 10 new heroin users began by abusing prescription painkillers and moved to heroin when they could no longer obtain or afford those painkillers.

The public can submit tips anonymously, via a DEA text tip line. Utilizing a mobile device, send a text to "TIP411" and start your message with "TIPDEA."
Forestry recreation staff find creative, short-term fixes for increasing demand and limited resources (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/06/16 12:31 PM
Student volunteers help ODF recreation staff build stone steps for a trail leading to the Wilson River.
Student volunteers help ODF recreation staff build stone steps for a trail leading to the Wilson River.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1072/94232/thumb_Stone_step_construction.jpg
Moscow, Idaho gets cold. With temperatures averaging near-freezing in March, it isn't the first thought for many spring breakers. So a group of University of Idaho students hit the road, looking for something different.

They didn't arrive in southern California or Florida----they detoured to a one-of-a-kind place in Oregon's soggy Coast Range.

"It's true that the Tillamook State Forest is quieter during the winter," said Clyde Zeller, a veteran ODF recreation staffer. "But come summer, everyday feels like spring break along the Wilson River corridor because of the crowds and activity. We work around the clock to keep up."

Through an ongoing partnership between ODF and the University of Idaho, 10 students spent the week camping at the Jones Creek Campground in the Tillamook State Forest. Volunteering with ODF recreation staff, they contributed 224 volunteer hours performing trail maintenance and restoration work.

The first two days completed a trail to the Wilson River after an older trail became too steep, gradually eroding into the river. Learning how to grade, excavate and level a pad, and install wooden steps, the students moved gravel to create a smooth new surface. The next day they constructed stone steps and picked up trash at busy recreation spots.

On their last day, volunteers potted 800 tree seedlings at the Northwest Outdoor Restoration Partnership nursery in Tillamook. The nursery is a Bureau of Land Management and Tillamook Estuaries Partnership cooperative, providing native plants for restoration work underway by local watershed councils and land management agencies such as ODF.

"Our partnership with the University of Idaho is a great example of collaboration and resourcefulness," said Zeller. "As northwest Oregon state forests become increasingly more popular for outdoor recreation, we do our best to find short-term solutions such as volunteer support and leveraging partnerships when possible. Unfortunately this isn't sustainable as state forest recreation becomes increasingly more popular, causing demand to outpace the resources available for adequate management."

The students toured the Oregon coast before heading home, camping at Cape Lookout State Park and exploring the Salmonberry River, the Tillamook Forest Center, and the Tillamook Cheese Factory. The ODF Tillamook District will host another group in March 2017.

The University of Idaho's Alternative Service Break program provides students opportunities to develop leadership skills through service across the globe focusing on social justice issues. Spring ASB offers week-long regional trips based in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming performing trail work, habitat restoration, and working with the homeless.

Learn more about the University of Idaho Alternative Service Breaks program here:
https://www.uidaho.edu/current-students/student-involvement/volunteer/asb

Learn more about Oregon Department of Forestry recreation opportunities here:
http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Recreation/Pages/default.aspx

Learn more about greatest permanent value and its blueprint for providing a range of forest benefits for Oregonians here:
http://arcweb.sos.state.or.us/pages/rules/oars_600/oar_629/629_035.html

Learn more about state forests here:
http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Working/Pages/StateForests.aspx

###


Attached Media Files: Student volunteers help ODF recreation staff build stone steps for a trail leading to the Wilson River. , University of Idaho students volunteer to pick up trash at busy Tillamook State Forest recreation spots. , University of Idaho students celebrate the week at the Oregon Department of Forestry Tillamook District Office.
Streamside (Riparian) Rulemaking Advisory Committee meets May 12
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/06/16 11:44 AM
Release date: May 6, 2016

Contact:
Angie Lane, Project Manager, 503-945-7387, angie.g.lane@oregon.gov


The Riparian Rulemaking Advisory Committee will meet on May 12 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Keizer Community Civic Center, 930 Chemawa Road NE, Keizer. The committee will discuss:
Timeline and expectations to complete the committee's work
How to define the term "well-distributed" for trees adding to the streamside buffer
Possible relief for landowners impacted by the new policy
Recommendations from the agency for integrating new rule language into the current rules.
The committee advises the agency for drafting rules the Board of Forestry will consider when adopting rules to implement its decision to increase streamside shade buffers along some fish-bearing streams.

This is a public meeting that includes opportunities to provide comment at the beginning and end of the meeting. The meeting is accessible to persons with disabilities. Interpreter requests for the hearing impaired and other accommodations should be made by May 9. For more information about attending the meeting, please contact Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

###
356th Basic Police Class to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Oregon Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/06/16 11:10 AM
The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 356th Basic Police Class.

The Basic Police Class is 16-weeks in length and includes dozens of training areas including survival skills, firearms, emergency vehicle operations, ethics, cultural diversity, problem solving, community policing, elder abuse, drug recognition, and dozens of other subjects.

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training would like to invite you to join us in observing the ceremony and congratulating Basic Police #BP356 on their successful completion of basic training. The graduation will be held at the Oregon Public Safety Academy at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE in Salem, Oregon on Friday, May 13, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. with a reception immediately following the graduation. Chief Jason Schermerhorn, of the Cannon Beach Police Department, will be the guest speaker.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.
Reception immediately following.

Graduating members of BP356:

Deputy Sheriff John Auth
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Ryan Bambrick
Lincoln City Police Department

Police Officer Lee Bartholomew
Hillsboro Police Department

Police Officer Ryan Bernards
LaGrande Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Anel Ceric
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Timothy Claffey
Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

Deputy Sheriff Tanner Cooney
Morrow County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Christopher Desert
Eugene Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Stephanie Dick
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Kevin Duryea
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff John DuVal
Klamath County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer James Euscher
Lake Oswego Police Department

Police Officer Daniel Fouch
Newberg-Dundee Police Department

Trooper Melissa Gallagher
Oregon State Police

Police Officer Alaster Graham
Monmouth Police Department

Police Officer Brenon Harris
Eugene Police Department

Undersheriff Paul Havel
Lake County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Shane Henderson
Coos, Lower Umpqua & Siuslaw Tribal PD

Police Officer Jimmy Ho
Beaverton Police Department

Deputy Sheriff David Huey
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Michael Jackson
Medford Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Eric King
Crook County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Katelynn Larsen
Gresham Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Oscar Madrigal-Mendoza
Morrow County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Beth Mayer
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Lieutenant Nicole Morrisey-O'Donnell
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Jennifer Peckels
Eugene Police Department

Police Officer Cody Pesio
Vernonia Police Department

Police Officer Bradley Schuetz
Forest Grove Police Department

Police Officer Ashley Serdar
Lake Oswego Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Kyle Sheleny
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff John Skoglund
Washington County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Michael Smith
Polk County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Nathaniel Staller
Rogue River Police Department

Police Officer Jacob Stout
Woodburn Police Department

Trooper Kristofer Strubel
Oregon State Police

Police Officer Jodi Symonds
Cannon Beach Police Department

Police Officer Jill Thissell
Independence Police Department

Police Officer Matthew Torassa
Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

Police Officer Alexis Torland
Gresham Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Brandon Welch
Washington County Sheriff's Office
Notice to Media from Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 05/06/16 9:23 AM
While we never know what Oregon's wildfire season will bring, we do have a vivid reminder of how tragic and damaging a wildfire can be as shown by the current situation in Canada with the Fort McMurray fire. The fire has destroyed more than 1,600 homes and other buildings and forced the evacuation of nearly 90,000 people.

So, what if Oregon experienced a fire of this magnitude? What can Oregon residents do to protect and prepare themselves? State Fire Marshal Jim Walker is available for interviews to answer these questions and any others that members of the Oregon media may have.

To request an interview with State Fire Marshal Jim Walker, contact OSFM Public Affairs Officer Rich Hoover by one of the methods below.
Hillsboro Woman Loses Life After Crashing Her Motorcycle - Columbia County
Oregon State Police - 05/06/16 8:13 AM
On May 5th, 2016 at about 5PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Highway 202 west of the 47 junction (south of Clatskanie).

Preliminary investigation reveals a group of motorcyclists were traveling eastbound on Highway 202 when one of the riders failed to negotiate a corner. The motorcycle, a 2004 Harley Davidson, struck a guardrail which ejected the rider.

The rider, Peggy I AITCHISON, age 68, of Hillsboro, was declared deceased on scene by emergency personnel.

Highway 202 was closed for over three hours while the on-scene investigation was conducted. OSP was assisted by the Oregon Department of Transportation and the Mist-Birkenfeld Fire Department.

More information will be released as it becomes available.
Protecting Our Waterways from Invaders (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 05/06/16 7:48 AM
Mussels found in a boat being transported into Oregon in 2015
Mussels found in a boat being transported into Oregon in 2015
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/4139/94217/thumb_042415_Zebra-mussels-in-boat-drain_Apr-2015.jpg
It's been six years since the Oregon Legislature enacted the Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Program, aimed at protecting Oregon's waterways from the economic and environmental devastation experienced in the Midwest from invasive quagga and zebra mussels. Since the program's inception, the Oregon State Marine Board (OSMB) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) have issued an annual report highlighting the year's activities to include mandatory check stations, education and outreach, and program finances.

In 2015, ODFW completed 12,953 watercraft inspections of trailered boats and non-motorized boats at mandatory roadside check stations along border points of entry. Two hundred and eighty one of the 12,953 boats inspected were contaminated with invaders: 207 with aquatic vegetation, 33 with marine organisms, and 29 with freshwater organisms. The remaining 12 were contaminated with either quagga or zebra mussels originating from Arizona, Louisiana, Michigan, Nevada, Ohio, Ontario, Pennsylvania, Utah and Wisconsin. These boats were decontaminated with high pressure and hot water at the inspection stations.

In addition to the inspection stations, OSMB and ODFW expanded education and outreach efforts by distributing printed materials through additional partnerships with park rangers, river rangers, biologists, and researchers.
Another enhancement was increasing on water enforcement of the permit and education about the program. In 2015, officers documented 47,781 contacts with boaters. Most of these boaters were in compliance, however, 810 warnings were issued for boaters who did not have an aquatic invasive species permit, and 356 citations were issued.

Some of the permit fees were dedicated to monitoring Oregon's waterways. Portland State University's (PSU) Center for Lakes and Reservoirs supported two programs: monitoring waterways for zebra and quagga mussels, and continuing the Oregon Lake Watch Program. With the help of volunteers who "adopt" a waterway, these individuals were provided technical field training and equipment to sample the waterbody a few times during the year. PSU collected the data and tracked locations where aquatic invasive species of concern were found.

Aquatic Invasive Species revenue is also being used for targeted removal efforts. In 2010, an invasive colonial tunicate (Dideemnum vexillum) was found in two locations: The Charleston Marina and Winchester Bay's "triangle" on the southwestern Oregon coast. In 2015, an underwater suction dredge was purchased and will be used in 2016 at the Winchester Bay location to begin removing the tunicates from where they are growing. Monitoring at the Charleston Marina continues, with any found tunicates being removed by divers when found. The annual dive surveys indicated a population decrease in this location.

Revenue generated from the permit sales slightly increased over 2014, with $796,753. There were 77,766 motorboat owners who renewed their boat registrations, which include a $5 surcharge that goes directly into the AIS fund. Out-of-state boaters purchased 4,979 permits, 2,300 permits were sold to guides and rental facilities and 52,271 permits were sold to non-motorized boat owners (number includes annual and two-year permits).

All of the permit fees go directly into the AIS program that funds inspection station staff, decontamination equipment, education and outreach materials, and waterway monitoring.

For more information about the Aquatic Invasive Species Program, visit www.boatoregon.com or http://www.dfw.state.or.us/conservationstrategy/invasive_species/quagga_zebra_mussel.asp.

###


Attached Media Files: Mussels found in a boat being transported into Oregon in 2015 , Aquatic Invasive Species Fiscal Chart
OSP Continuing Death Investigation - Sherman County
Oregon State Police - 05/06/16 7:46 AM
On May 3rd, 2016 at about 9PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel received reports of a subject laying on the shoulder of Interstate 84 near milepost 107 (east of Biggs Junction).

A trooper arrived on scene shortly after and found a 48 year old male laying on his stomach. The male was in medical distress and his condition rapidly deteriorated prior to medical personnel arriving. The male stopped breathing and the trooper, along with a Sherman County Deputy, began CPR. The trooper and deputy performed CPR for almost thirty minutes and were relieved by medical personnel once they arrived. The male was later pronounced deceased at the scene.

The male was identified as Thomas L KELSEY, age 48, of Deer Park, Washington. The investigation is continuing into the cause of his death and is being referred to the medical examiner. OSP was assisted by the Sherman County Sheriff's Office, South Sherman County Fire Department, and Mid-Columbia Fire and Rescue.

More information will be released when it becomes available.
Speed Racing Suspected As Cause Of Crash That Killed McMinnville Man (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/06/16 6:38 AM
2016-05/1002/94215/IMG_7414.JPG
2016-05/1002/94215/IMG_7414.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1002/94215/thumb_IMG_7414.JPG
On May 4, 2016 at about 8:50 PM, OSP Troopers responded to a collision involving two vehicles on Highway 99W near milepost 34 (north of McMinnville).

Initial investigation reveals that a 2010 Mitsubishi Lancer was traveling northbound on Highway 99W when it lost control and spun across the paved center median and struck a southbound 2004 Honda Odyssey van nearly head-on.

The driver of the Mitsubishi, Jeromy G HOPPER, age 24, of McMinnville, was transported to the hospital with serious injuries. HOPPER's passenger, Natasha FISHER, age 18, of McMinnville was transported by air ambulance to a Portland hospital with critical injuries.

The driver of the Honda, Claudio MARTINEZ MARQUEZ, age 43, of McMinnville, was pronounced deceased at the scene. MARTINEZ MARQUEZ's passenger, Bonifacio MARTINEZ GARCIA, age 33, of McMinnville was transported to the hospital with serious injuries.

The operator of a Silver 2013 Mitsubishi Lancer remained at the scene after the crash.

Speed racing is being investigated as a factor in the cause of this crash. Anybody with information regarding this crash should call the Oregon State Police at 503-472-2184.

HWY 99W was closed for approximately 8 hours. OSP was assisted by the Yamhill County Sheriff's Office, McMinnville Police Department, Newberg Police Department ODOT, and McMinnville Fire Department.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1002/94215/IMG_7414.JPG
Thu. 05/05/16
OHA statement - FDA to extend authority to all tobacco products
Oregon Health Authority - 05/05/16 3:47 PM
EDITORS: Karen Girard, manager of OHA's Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention Section, is available for interviews. Contact Jonathan Modie at 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us to make arrangements.

May 5, 2016

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announcement is available on the FDA website at
http://www.fda.gov/TobaccoProducts/Labeling/RulesRegulationsGuidance/ucm388395.htm.

Lillian Shirley, director, Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division:

"The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) took a critical step today and finalized a rule establishing oversight for all tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, cigars, and hookah. Cigarette use in Oregon and nationally has declined as regulations have limited flavors, labeling and marketing. However, there has been little regulation of other tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, hookah and cigars, and use is on the rise among Oregon's youth. These FDA historic regulations improve public health and protect future generations from the dangers of tobacco use through a variety of steps, including restricting the sale of these tobacco products to minors nationwide."

Facts about tobacco use in Oregon:

Since the comprehensive Tobacco Prevention and Education Program (TPEP) launched in 1997, tobacco consumption and youth smoking in Oregon has been reduced by more than 50 percent. Despite declines in tobacco use, it remains the No. 1 preventable cause of death and disease in Oregon and the United States.

Between 2103 and 2015, other tobacco product use among Oregon eighth-graders doubled, and increased 27 percent among 11th-graders.

Tobacco is cheap and available in flavors and packaging that are attractive to youth and young adults, heavily promoted, and marketed in locations that are easily accessible to them.

In 2015, Oregon took additional steps to protect Oregonians from the harms of tobacco products.

Oregon expanded the Indoor Clean Air Act (ICAA) to protect all Oregonians from the potential harms of e-cigarettes and other inhalants.

Oregon is in the process of regulating packaging and labeling requirements for inhalant delivery systems and will align these with the new FDA regulations.

The FDA will now be able to:
-- Prohibit free samples
-- Require warning labels
-- Prevent misleading health claims by tobacco product manufacturers
-- Evaluate the ingredients of all tobacco products and how they are made
-- Communicate the potential risks of tobacco products

These are important steps, and Oregon will continue working to protect Oregonians from the harms of tobacco.

# # #
Air data: Hexavalent chromium persists, but selenium levels drop
Oregon Health Authority - 05/05/16 2:20 PM
EDITORS: Brian Boling, DEQ laboratory program manager, and David Farrer, OHA toxicologist, are available today between 3 and 4 p.m. to discuss air monitoring results. Contact their agencies' communications staffers to set up an interview.

May 5, 2016

Cement, rail, trucking, chrome-plating sites are potential chromium sources

State agencies continue to investigate the source of hexavalent chromium in the air in southeast Portland that has averaged above health-based targets since 24-hour monitoring began in early March.

Authorities say they're encouraged by the latest air monitoring data that show levels of the heavy metal selenium have returned to levels expected in urban environments. Selenium levels had jumped after Bullseye Glass Co. in southeast Portland increased use of selenium in its manufacturing process beginning April 6.

Still, the persistence of increased hexavalent chromium readings over time remains a concern to the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and Oregon Health Authority, even as all metals collected by DEQ air monitors remain below Oregon 24-hour screening levels. Oregon 24-hour screening levels are short-term concentrations below which immediate health effects are not expected to occur.

DEQ investigators continue to seek the source of the heavy metal that has been, on average, elevated in southeast Portland since March 1. The target concentration for hexavalent chromium is 0.08 nanograms per cubic meter of air (ng/m3) when compared to an annual average, but the 57-day average ranged between 0.0827 nanograms and 0.297 nanograms across the four monitoring locations surrounding Bullseye Glass. The company did not use chromium in glass production during this period.

DEQ is looking at several potential sources, including a cement plant, rail yard, trucking facility and two chrome-plating facilities, and have visited, or are planning visits to these sites in the coming days. They also are studying wind data and are planning to move air monitors to these areas in an attempt to "triangulate" the source.

Weekly air monitoring data from southeast and north Portland are reported each week by the interagency group that includes DEQ and OHA, and published at SaferAir.Oregon.gov. For information about the Cleaner Air Oregon initiative to align industrial air toxics regulations with human health, visit CleanerAir.Oregon.gov.

# # #
Be alert for landslides in southern Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 05/05/16 12:41 PM
MEDFORD, Ore. - The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood watch from today at 2 p.m. through Friday evening for areas of southern Oregon. Landslides are possible in steep terrain during this weather event, and the risk is even higher in recently burned areas.

The flash flood watch is in effect for most of Lake County and far eastern Klamath County. Track Oregon flood watches here: http://1.usa.gov/1EM7qNl

"Intense rainfall is one of the most common landslide triggers," says Ali Ryan Hansen, communications director for the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI). "Slides are possible during this weather, so it's important to be aware of the potential hazard and avoid areas with steep terrain and burn areas."

People, structures and roads located below steep slopes in canyons and near the mouths of canyons may be at serious risk. Caution should be used when traveling. According to DOGAMI, dangerous places include:
- Canyon bottoms, stream channels, and areas of rock and soil accumulation at the outlets of canyons.
- Bases of steep hillsides.
- Road cuts or other areas where slopes of hills have been excavated or over-steepened.
- Places where slides or debris flows have occurred in the past.

Learn more about landslides and debris flows and how to prepare for them:
Statewide Landslide Information Database (SLIDO): www.oregongeology.org/slido
Landslide and debris flow resources: http://bit.ly/landslidehazards
SAVE THE DATE! Make plans to attend a DHS Budget Town Hall Meeting in June
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/05/16 11:54 AM
You are invited to provide input and feedback to the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) on our programs, services and priorities for our 2017 budget and legislative session. We will be holding "Budget Town Hall" meetings on the following programs: Child Welfare, Aging and People with Disabilities, Intellectual/Developmental Disability Services, Self Sufficiency Programs, Vocational Rehabilitation, and DHS agency operations. Your input and participation is extremely valuable to us. Please SAVE THE DATE for a meeting in your local area.

We're finalizing the details of time and specific locations/parking right now, and more information will be coming soon:
Monday, June 20
Portland
Tuesday, June 21
Salem
Wednesday, June 22
Eugene
Thursday, June 23
Medford
-----
Monday, June 27
Bend
Tuesday, June 28
Pendleton
Thursday, June 30
Statewide webinar -- a web-based, interactive meeting, more details to come later

Thank you!

Questions?
Please contact DHS.DirectorsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us
Be alert for landslides in central, northeast Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 05/05/16 10:48 AM
OREGON - The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood watch through tonight for areas of central and northeast Oregon. Landslides are possible in steep terrain during this weather event, and the risk is even higher in recently burned areas.

The flash flood watch is in effect for Baker County, the John Day Basin and Ochoco-John Day Highlands, Grande Ronde Valley, the northern Blue Mountains of Oregon, and the southern Blue Mountains of Oregon and Wallowa County. According to the NWS, the Canyon Creek fire burn scar in Grant County and the Cornet Windy Ridge burn scar in Baker County are of particular concern. Recently burned areas may have debris flows and mud flows.

"Intense rainfall is one of the most common landslide triggers," says Ali Ryan Hansen, communications director for the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI). "Slides are possible during this weather, so it's important to be aware of the potential hazard and avoid areas with steep terrain and burn areas."

People, structures and roads located below steep slopes in canyons and near the mouths of canyons may be at serious risk. Caution should be used when traveling. According to DOGAMI, dangerous places include:
- Canyon bottoms, stream channels, and areas of rock and soil accumulation at the outlets of canyons.
- Bases of steep hillsides.
- Road cuts or other areas where slopes of hills have been excavated or over-steepened.
- Places where slides or debris flows have occurred in the past.

Learn more about landslides and debris flows and how to prepare for them:
Statewide Landslide Information Database (SLIDO): www.oregongeology.org/slido
Landslide and debris flow resources: http://bit.ly/landslidehazards
Wed. 05/04/16
Unclaimed $50,000 prize expires Friday
Oregon Lottery - 05/04/16 2:34 PM
May 4, 2016 - Salem, Ore. -- Time is running out for a $50,000 Powerball prize!

The ticket, with the winning numbers of 23-24-27-39-41 and Powerball of 30, was purchased in Grants Pass on May 6, 2015 and expires at 5 p.m. Friday, May 6 -- one year from the date of the drawing. It was the only ticket with a $50,000 prize in Oregon for that draw date. Lottery rules give winners one year from the date of the drawing to claim their prize.

"The odds of winning a $50,000 prize are one in 913,129, so it would be a huge shame if the person who won didn't claim their prize," said Patrick Johnson, Lottery spokesman. "Most people who win come in within a month of the drawing. This prize might not be a prize worth millions, but I don't know anybody would couldn't use an extra $50,000."

The ticket was sold in the afternoon of May 6, 2015. The Oregon Lottery doesn't reveal the exact location the ticket was sold, for ticket validation purposes.

The Grants Pass Powerball win isn't the only unclaimed ticket. Two other substantial prizes have yet to be claimed, as well.

There is another unclaimed $50,000 Powerball prize, which was sold December 2, 2015 in Sisters. The winning numbers for that ticket are 7-10-46-50-56 with a Powerball of 1. The drawing for the prize was held Dec. 9, 2015 and the player has until Dec. 9, 2016 to claim the $50,000 prize.

Oregon Lottery officials are also waiting for a $1 million Mega Millions prize to be claimed. This ticket was sold on the morning of Jan. 13 in Newport with the winning numbers of 29-41-53-54-70 for the Jan. 15, 2016 drawing. The odds of winning $1 million playing Mega Millions is one in 18,492,204. The player has until Jan. 15, 2017 to claim the prize.

The funds from unclaimed Lottery prizes go back to the state to fund education, state parks, watershed enhancement and economic development.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, winners should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim the prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $10 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org
Dan James appointed new deputy administrator for BPA (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 05/04/16 2:05 PM
Dan James appointed new deputy administrator for BPA.
Dan James appointed new deputy administrator for BPA.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1236/94149/thumb_BPA-Deputy-Administrator-Dan-James.jpg
Portland, Ore. - BPA Administrator Elliot Mainzer announced today the appointment of Dan James, formerly of the regional utility cooperative PNGC Power, to the position of deputy administrator for the Northwest power marketing agency.

"Dan is a terrific addition to the leadership team at Bonneville -- his character and experience get right at the heart of what we are about: focusing on safety and staying connected to the region through customers, tribes, constituents and others," said Mainzer. "Dan's positive demeanor is infectious, and he's dedicated to operational excellence and achieving tangible results."

As deputy administrator, James will be responsible for leadership, strategic planning, financial management, and regulatory affairs as well as intergovernmental and public affairs oversight. He will oversee and provide direction and guidance for program execution and administration to executive vice presidents, vice presidents and managers of Corporate Strategy, Finance, Communications, Intergovernmental Affairs, the Ombudsman, and Compliance, Audit and Risk.

"I am delighted to have Dan's long-time expertise in the energy field joining Bonneville," said U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon. "His relationship with the congressional delegation spans decades, and he brings an important knowledge of the Northwest's energy needs."

James comes to BPA from PNGC Power, where he has served as vice president of public affairs and marketing since 2007.

Prior to his PNGC experience, James worked as a federal affairs representative at Pacific Northwest Waterways Association in Vancouver, Wash., and as a senior government relations specialist at Ball Janik LLP in Portland and Washington, D.C.

"Dan is a great choice for the deputy position," said Scott Corwin, executive director of the Public Power Council, which represents the interests of publicly owned utilities in the Northwest. "Having worked in various sectors involving the river system, he is one of the foremost experts on issues impacting BPA and the Columbia Basin. Dan has a sterling reputation for integrity and sincere collaboration and will be a great asset to Bonneville and to the citizens of the region in this role."

"Dan understands the unique role that BPA plays in the lives of the people it serves, and the opportunities and challenges facing the agency," said Beth Looney, president and CEO of PNGC Power. "I look forward to working with him in the years ahead."

James is also a member of the National Preference Customer Committee of the National Electric Cooperative Association and is a senior fellow of the Oregon chapter of the American Leadership Forum.

"The region is very lucky to have Dan named deputy administrator at BPA. His broad knowledge base and vast experience, both in the region and in Washington, D.C., will benefit all customers of BPA," said Mark Johnson, general manager of Flathead Electric Cooperative of Kalispell, Mont., and chairman of the executive committee for the Public Power Council. "As a Montanan, it is always nice to see another Montanan, especially one from the Flathead Valley, achieve such an important and influential position. All of us in public power will miss Dan in his current role, but we know he will represent us well, and I look forward to working with him as the deputy administrator."

James grew up in western Montana near Flathead Lake. He earned a bachelor's degree in political science at Pacific University in Forest Grove, Ore., in 1987 and remains a faithful follower of the university's football team to this day. He also earned a utility management certificate from Willamette University in Portland in 2015. He has served on boards for such community organizations as United Way of Columbia-Willamette, Pacific University, Oregon Wave Energy Trust and the Pacific Youth Choir. He lives in Northeast Portland with his spouse and two teenage daughters.

"I have been fortunate to live in the Northwest most of my life and work for the people of our rural areas most of my career," said James. "I am excited to join Elliot's team at a time when the agency faces unique opportunities and challenges."

James is scheduled to start in the deputy administrator position within the next several weeks.


Attached Media Files: Dan James appointed new deputy administrator for BPA.
Personal Document Shredding Event, Food Drive, and Drug Disposal
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/04/16 2:04 PM
This event will take place at the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Substation in La Pine, 51340 Highway 97, La Pine, Oregon, on Saturday May 7th from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. There is no cost to the public for up to 4 medium size boxes of personal documents.

Shredding:

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office and Data Delete of Oregon are collaborating on May 7th to provide residents the opportunity to safely destroy personal documents and learn identity theft prevention tips.

The event is intended for private residential document shredding and is not for business or company disposal. At the event, the Sheriff's Office and Mid Oregon Credit Union will also have information on how to avoid becoming an identity theft victim and what to do if you believe your identity has already been stolen.

No advance document sorting is necessary as shredding equipment can destroy paperwork with paper clips or staples attached. File folders and binders may also be shredded. There is no cost to the public for up to 4 medium size boxes of personal documents.



Donate a Non-Perishable Food:

The Sheriff's Office is asking event participants to consider bringing a donation of non-perishable food to benefit the La Pine Community Kitchen. Food for La Pine Community Kitchen will be collected at the event.


Drug Disposal Program:

At the event, the Sheriff's Office will also have a deputy available to collect outdated or unwanted prescription medication. No needles or over-the-counter drugs will be accepted.

The drug disposal program is designed to keep unwanted or unused medications away from abusers, children and animals. The program is also intended to reduce negative environmental impact to the water, soil and landfill's by using proper disposal practices.
LSTA Advisory Council meeting at Oregon State Library, 5/16 and 5/17/16
Oregon State Library - 05/04/16 11:26 AM
Oregon's Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Advisory Council will meet at the Oregon State Library on Monday and Tuesday, May 16 & 17, 2016. Serenity Ibsen will chair the meeting, which will begin at 1:00 p.m. on May 16th and 9:00 a.m. on May 17th.

The Council will review the 2016 grant proposals and make recommendations to the Oregon State Library Board concerning the state's LSTA program. The Council will hear updates from the Statewide Database Licensing Advisory (SDLAC) and Answerland Advisory Committees. There will be a demonstration and budget proposal from Oregon School Library Information System (OSLIS).

An open forum will be held Monday, May 16th at 4 p.m. Any member of the public may address the Council on any topic during the open forum.

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested prior to 48 hours before the meeting; notice prior to 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats prior to 72 hours before the meeting. Requests may be made to Ferol Weyand at 503-378-2525.


LSTA Advisory Council Meeting Agenda
May 16-17, 2016
Oregon State Library, Meeting Room 103
250 Winter St., Salem, OR

AGENDA

Monday, May 16, 2016

1:00 p.m. Introductions

1:10 Approval of the Agenda
Approval of the Minutes, September 14, 2015

1:15 Housekeeping -- Ferol Weyand

1:20 Report from the State Librarian, MaryKay Dahlgreen

1:35 Budget Update FFY2015 and Proposed FFY2016, Susan Westin

1:45 OSLIS demonstration and budget proposal, Jen Maurer

2:00 E-rate budget proposal, Darci Hanning

2:10 Edge update, Darci Hanning

2:20 Continuing Education for library staff, Darci Hanning

2:30 Break

2:45 Answerland, Tamara Ottum
Introducing new coordinator
Update on RFP
Approval of Answerland Advisory Committee formation, bylaws and members

3:00 Statewide Database Licensing Advisory Committee Request
Election of SDLAC committee members -- Arlene Weible
Budget proposal -- Diane Sotak
Centralized portal proposal -- Diane Sotak

4:00 Open forum

4:30 p.m. Recess



Tuesday, May 17, 2016

9:00 a.m. Council Meeting Reconvenes

9:05 Process Review, Ann Reed

9:25 Review of and scoring of LSTA competitive proposals (returning and new) and statewide projects proposals

10:30 Break

10:45 Continue review and scoring of grant proposals

12:00 p.m. Working Lunch

12:30 Presentation of ranked grant applications

1:00 Discussion of all grant proposals

2:30 Recommendations to the State Library Board

2:40 5 year plan evaluation process, Susan Westin

2:45 Review 2016 grant process

2:50 Review action items

3:00 p.m. Adjournment

all times are approximate except for Open Forum
Tue. 05/03/16
Task Force on School Nursing meets May 6 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 05/03/16 3:41 PM
May 3, 2016

What: The monthly public meeting of the Task Force on School Nursing

Agenda: Continue state funding discussions; hear about the history of school health-related task forces in Oregon; learn about school nursing data.

When: Friday, May 6, 12:30-3:30 pm. The meeting is open to the public.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1A, 800 NE Oregon St.

Details: The Task Force on School Nursing is a governor-appointed task force legislatively mandated by SB 698 (2015). The task force is charged with:
-- Examining health care funding sources to support school health services
-- Recommending sustainable funding sources for school health services
-- Recommending standards of school nursing practices
-- Recommending ways to create a coordinated school health services model that directs an appropriate level of funding to school nursing and school-based health centers

More information, including task force members, meeting agendas and minutes, is available on the task force's website at https://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyPeopleFamilies/Youth/HealthSchool/Pages/Task-Force-on-School-Nursing.aspx.

For more information about the task force, contact Jamie Smith at 971-673-0724 or jamie.leon.smith@state.or.us.

# # #
Body recovered in ocean near Depoe Bay
Oregon State Police - 05/03/16 2:58 PM
On May 3, 2016 at approximately 10:00 AM Oregon State Police was notified of a deceased body in the Whale Cove water area just south of Depoe Bay.

The body was recovered and at this time is confirmed to be an unidentified male. The Oregon State Police Medical Examiner will work on identification through DNA.

OSP Patrol was assisted by Depoe Bay Fire, Seal Rock Fire, US Coast Guard, OSP Fish and Wildlife and Criminal Division.
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2016 Fellows to exhibit in Governor's Office May 16-June 30 (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 05/03/16 2:49 PM
2016-05/1418/94100/Ball_Natalie_ToBeContinued01.jpg
2016-05/1418/94100/Ball_Natalie_ToBeContinued01.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1418/94100/thumb_Ball_Natalie_ToBeContinued01.jpg
Salem, OR -- Works by the Oregon Arts Commission's 2016 Individual Artist Fellowship recipients will be exhibited in the Governor's Office, in the Capitol Building in Salem, May 16 through June 30.

The 2016 fellowships in the visual arts and design were awarded to Natalie Ball, Chiloquin; Fernanda D'Agostino, Portland; Laurie Danial, Portland; Tannaz Farsi, Eugene; Julie Green, Corvallis; Laura Heit, Portland; Michael T. Hensley, Portland; Aaron Flint Jamison, Portland; Jim Lommasson, Portland; Elizabeth Malaska, Portland; Brenna Murphy, Portland; Ronna Neuenschwander, Portland; and Blair Saxon-Hill, Portland. Selected works span painting, printmaking, photography, sculpture and installation.

The Individual Artist Fellowship Program honors Oregon's professional artists and their artistic achievements and supports their efforts to advance their careers. Fellows are recommended by a review panel of arts professionals who consider artists of outstanding talent, demonstrated ability and commitment to the creation of new work(s). The Arts Commission also awards annual Fellowships in the Media Arts and alternating year Fellowships in Literary Arts and Performance.

The Art in the Governor's Office Program honors selected artists in Oregon with exhibitions in the reception area of the Governor's Office in the State Capitol. Only professional, living Oregon artists are considered and an exhibit in the Governor's office is considered a "once in a lifetime" honor. Artists whose work has previously been shown in the Governor's office include Henk Pander, Michele Russo, Manuel Izquierdo, James Lavadour, Margot Voorhies Thompson, Gordon Gilkey and Yuji Hiratsuka.



The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission's expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development.

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org

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Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1418/94100/Ball_Natalie_ToBeContinued01.jpg
First look at 2017 proposed health insurance rates
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 05/03/16 1:22 PM
Salem -- Oregon consumers can now get a first look at proposed rates for 2017 individual and small employer health insurance plans.

Health insurance companies submitted rate requests to the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Division of Financial Regulation on May 2. The division must review and approve any rates before they can be charged to policyholders.

"For the next two months, we will analyze the requested rates to ensure they adequately cover costs without being too high or too low," said Insurance Commissioner Laura Cali. "Our open process allows Oregonians to see everything we do and provide comments on the filings that affect them."

The proposed rates are for plans that comply with the Affordable Care Act for small businesses and individuals who buy their own coverage rather than getting it through an employer.

In the individual market, 10 companies submitted average rate change requests ranging from 0 percent to a 32.3 percent increase. In the small group market, 12 companies submitted average rate requests ranging from a 5 percent decrease to a 17 percent increase. See the attached chart for the full list of rate requests.

Starting May 6, Oregonians will be able to search rate filings and submit comments at oregonhealthrates.org. Once scheduled, hearing information will be posted to this website.

Oregonians are encouraged to comment on rate change requests during the public comment period, which is open May 6 through June 24. The public can submit comments online and during public rate hearings.

Preliminary decisions will be announced June 16, and final decisions will be released July 1.

###

The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dcbs.oregon.gov and dfr.oregon.gov.


Attached Media Files: Proposed 2017 Average Health Insurance Rate Requests
OSP Continuing Fatal Crash Investigation On Highway 101 - Curry County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/03/16 12:29 PM
Photo
Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1002/94089/thumb_Photo.jpg
On April 29, 2016 at 4:44 p.m., Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle crash on Highway 101 near milepost 361 (three miles south of Brookings).

Preliminary information revealed a red 2006 F-350 pickup, operated by Rebecca CROCKETT, age 56, of Portland, had been traveling northbound on Highway 101 when it came to a stop in the left lane, waiting to make a left turn. The pickup had to yield to on-coming southbound traffic.

While waiting to turn left, the pickup was rear-ended by a northbound grey 2007 Mazda 3 passenger car operated by Susan CHILDRESS, age 47, of Brookings and passenger, Reggie DICKERSON, age 47, of Brookings. Upon emergency crews arriving on scene, both CHILDRESS and DICKERSON were transported to the Sutter Coast Hospital in Crescent City by ambulance. CHILDRESS was subsequently airlifted to a hospital in Redding, California and on May 1, 2016 died from her injuries. CROCKETT was not injured.

According to witness statements, CHILDRESS was traveling at a fast rate of speed and attempted to avoid colliding with the pickup at the last second.

One northbound lane of Highway 101 was closed for approximately two hours following the crash. OSP was assisted by Harbor Volunteer Fire Department, Curry County Sheriff's Office, Oregon Department of Transportation, and Cal-Ore Ambulance.


Attached Media Files: Photo
Public Health Advisory Board to hold special webinar meeting May 10 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 05/03/16 11:18 AM
May 3, 2016

What: A special webinar meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board

Agenda: Discussion about the public health modernization assessment

When: Tuesday, May 10, 2-4 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. Conference call line: 1-877-873-8017; access code, 767068.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 918. Webinar link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9062442391783091459

Oregon's Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon's governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon's State Health Improvement Plan.

For more information, contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284 or cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us or visit the board's website at http://public.health.oregon.gov/PROVIDERPARTNERRESOURCES/LOCALHEALTHDEPARTMENTRESOURCES/Pages/ophab.aspx.

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Long Term Care and Quality Steering Committee to meet May 13 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/03/16 10:41 AM
The Long Term Care and Quality Steering Committee is planning to meet on Friday, May 13, 2016 from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the Department of Human Services Cherry Avenue Training Center in the Mount Mazama Room, 3414 Cherry Ave., Salem/Keizer. This meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include: data reports from subcommittees; strategic planning of priorities; and discussion of future work and timelines.
Time for public comment will begin at about 9:45 a.m.

Interested people can also call in to the meeting: 1 888-363-4735, participant code: 3439085.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Ann McQueen at 503-930-7293 or ann.e.mcqueen@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the event.
For questions about this meeting, please contact: Ann McQueen at 503-930-7293 or ann.e.mcqueen@state.or.us.
Mon. 05/02/16
Applicants sought for State Scenic Bikeway Committee -- update
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/02/16 4:26 PM
Editor's Note: This updates the April 27 news release information about the number of open seats.


The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is seeking to establish a list of candidates to serve on the State Scenic Bikeway Committee in at-large positions.

Two seats are open on the 11-member committee. Members of the committee are appointed by the OPRD director to a four-year term and are eligible for reappointment. The committee meets approximately five times per year, usually in Salem, for an all-day meeting with additional field trips throughout the state to proposed and designated bikeways. The at-large positions are a volunteer appointment and authorized for travel reimbursement.

The ideal candidates would have experience with bicycle tourism, community groups, and experience with underserved groups.

The committee advises OPRD with the long view of strengthening the existing program and proponent groups associated with each designated bikeway and makes recommendations to the department on designations and other matters pertaining to the bikeways program.

Those interested in serving must submit a bikeway committee interest form by May 12. For information or to obtain an interest form, go to
http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/BIKE/Pages/info.aspx or contact Alex Phillips, at alex.phillips@oregon.gov or 503-986-0631.


Attached Media Files: 2016-05/1303/94065/05-02__Applicants_sought_for_Scenic_Bikeways_Committee.doc
Client and Staff Safety Task Force to meet Tuesday, May 31 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/02/16 4:06 PM
The Client and Staff Safety Task Force meeting is planned for Tuesday, May 31, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Oregon State Capitol, 900 Court Street NE Salem in Hearing Room B. This meeting is open to the public.

The conference phone number for those who can't attend in person is: 1-877-873-8017; enter participant code: 772325# when prompted.

The task force, which was created by Senate Bill 226, is directed to make recommendations on staff safety, resident care, and operation of the Stabilization and Crisis Units. The task force will meet approximately six times and provide a report to the Legislature by September 15, 2016.

The task force will consider and make recommendations for:
Ensuring the dignity and self-determination of each resident in a Stabilization and Crisis Unit;
Improving the safety of staff employed by a Stabilization and Crisis Unit;
Improving the training and support for staff;
Staffing levels;
Reducing incidents of aggressive and assaultive behavior by residents;
Reducing the need for staff to work overtime;
Improving access to appropriate mental health supports and intervention methods;
Ensuring the timely transition of residents in Stabilization and Crisis Units when ready to be placed with a residential service provider in the community, including recommendations for building capacity in community-based care settings.

An agenda will be coming in a later communication.

All meetings of this Task Force are open to the public and will conform to Oregon public meetings laws. Request for an accommodation for a person with disabilities should be made to Angie Allbee at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting. For more information, contact Angie Allbee, DHS Legislative Coordinator, at 503-689-5034.
Urban Forestry Conference slated for June 2 in Portland (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/02/16 3:37 PM
Speaker at the 2011 UCF Conference, Portland
Speaker at the 2011 UCF Conference, Portland
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1072/94061/thumb_UCF.Conference_June_2011_116.jpg
Oregon Community Trees hosts their annual Urban & Community Forestry conference, geared for professionals and other interested members of the public, from 8 a.m. -- 4 p.m. on Thursday June 2 at the World Forestry Center in Portland.

"Maintaining Magnificence: Preserving large trees in our community forests" is the theme of this year's conference.

Dr. Julian Dunster, internationally-recognized consulting arborist, professional forester and registered professional planner, is keynote speaker. Dunster will begin the day with an overview of the local, regional and global competing interests related to trees in urban areas. The discussion will also address management goals, timeframes, challenges and opportunities in community forests, and how to balance exuberant "tree worship" with pragmatic realities.

The conference program will also include presentations about creative strategies and tested techniques in community tree preservation. Urban forestry experts from California, Oregon, and Washington will share case studies, policies and technologies in use today to preserve the most magnificent members of community forests. The conference is presented in partnership with the Oregon Department of Forestry and the US Forest Service and funded by generous local and regional sponsors.

About Oregon Community Trees
The mission of Oregon Community Trees is to promote healthy urban and community forests through leadership, education, awareness, and advocacy. Its members include arborists, urban planners, community activists and foresters. In partnership with the Oregon Department of Forestry, O.C.T. hosts an annual Urban and Community Forestry Conference each year.

>Continuing education credits, conference location
The conference takes place at the World Forestry Center's Miller Hall.

Continuing education credits are available for Oregon registered landscape architects, landscape contractors, ISA certified arborists and SAF certified foresters. Breakfast, lunch, and closing reception are included with registration.

For more information and to register: http://goo.gl/plbzt8 or http://oregoncommunitytrees.org/


Attached Media Files: Speaker at the 2011 UCF Conference, Portland
Public hearing May 26 for Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant plan
Oregon Health Authority - 05/02/16 3:17 PM
May 2, 2016

What: The Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division is holding a hearing to take public comments on the agency's proposal for the use of funds from the Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant.

When: Thursday, May 26, 2-3 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1-C

Details: To participate by phone, call 1-888-251-2909, and use code 8975738#.

For more information about the meeting or to review the proposal, contact Danna Drum, Public Health Division block grant coordinator, at 971-673-1223.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. To request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations call OHA at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours prior to the meeting.

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Joint OHA, ODA, DEQ, ODFW statement on PSU oyster study
Oregon Health Authority - 05/02/16 12:31 PM
May 2, 2016

The Oregon Health Authority, Oregon Department of Agriculture, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife appreciate the work of Portland State University researchers to document the low concentrations of environmental contaminants detected within the state's oysters and other coastal species, published at http://www.pdx.edu/news/psu-study-finds-oregon-oysters-contain-drugs-other-toxins. Oregon is fortunate to have a system, set forth by a collaboration of state agencies with clear, active roles, for protecting our coastal waters, the shellfish species that call them home, and the many Oregonians--and people around the world--who consume them.

In 2013, as part of a statewide program to monitor toxics around the state, DEQ completed a monitoring program that analyzed sediment samples and oysters, mussels and clams for selected metals such as arsenic, cadmium, selenium, and mercury, PCBs, flame retardants, dioxins and furans, and chlorinated pesticides such as DDT. In 2013 and 2014, PSU had tissues from the same type of oysters analyzed for pharmaceuticals. Taken together, the oyster tissue samples from these studies showed:
--Low levels of contaminants, which were below OHA health screening levels.
--Levels of mercury that were low compared to other fish tissue around the state and similar to levels in clam and mussel samples collected from the same areas and below the OHA health screening level.
--Low levels of pharmaceuticals. The following is the amount of oyster meat that would have to be consumed to get a single dose of the pharmaceuticals at the amounts found in the oysters:

--- Naproxen (active ingredient in Aleve): more than 160,000 pounds.
--- Azythromycin (common antibiotic): more than 170,000 pounds.
--- Sulfamethoxazole (antibiotic): more than 630,000 pounds.
--- Diphenhydramine (antihistamine): more than 50,000 pounds.

OHA reviewed all of the oyster data reported in PSU's publication except the pharmaceutical results in March 2015. The study included softshell clams, and resulted in this advisory for softshell clams: http://www.oregon.gov/oha/news/Pages/OHA%20issues%20advisory%20for%20soft-shell%20clams%20along%20Oregon%20Coast.aspx. At the time, OHA also created this FAQ about other species and other contaminants tested: http://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/Recreation/FishConsumption/Documents/softshell-clam-advisory-faq.pdf.

It is important to emphasize that the low concentrations of contaminants measured in Olympia oysters' tissues were well below the OHA screening values designed to protect human health. It is equally important for people to know about the contaminants that do occur in oysters so that they can make informed decisions about which shellfish are safe to eat and how many meals are appropriate. Health officials continue to encourage everyone to eat a variety of shellfish as part of a healthy diet. More information about Oregon fish advisories is available on the OHA website at HealthOregon.org/fishadv.

About Oregon oysters

Olympia oysters (Ostrea lurida) are a small (1.5 to 2 inches) species native to a few bays and estuaries along the Oregon coast. Scattered populations of Olympia oysters are found only in Netarts, Yaquina and Coos bays. About the size of a silver dollar, the little Olympia oysters are rare and their densities are greatly diminished in comparison to historic levels. Consequently, ODFW prohibits recreational and commercial harvest of wild stocks of native Olympia oysters in Oregon due to the low population levels. Commercial mariculture of Olympia oysters is permitted by ODA only in Netarts Bay and Yaquina Bay, and they are infrequently eaten by humans.

In contrast, the vast majority of oysters cultivated and consumed in Oregon are Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas). This large (4 to 8 inches), non-native oyster is grown in commercial mariculture operations, harvested, and sold to retail outlets in Oregon and throughout the region. Pacific oysters have become the most widely farmed and commercially important oyster in the world. Both Olympia and Pacific oysters are filter-feeders that capture microscopic phytoplankton and other materials on their internal gills. The Olympia oyster, however, is a temperamental feeder that captures relatively large diatoms, dinoflagellates, and phytoplankton cells on a sporadic basis. In contrast, Pacific oysters feed nearly constantly on small phytoplankton cells, and they grow quickly to the size marketed to consumers.

Participating agencies

-- Oregon Health Authority: OHA conducts health risk assessments and provides recommendations to the public, through health advisories, on appropriate consumption of oysters when contaminants in these species are measured above health-based screening levels, or when these species are the source of a foodborne infection.
-- Oregon Department of Agriculture: ODA regulates commercial shellfish aquaculture in the state. Shellfish sold for human consumption can be grown only in waters that have been certified by the ODA as meeting U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards for water quality. These standards are based on fecal coliform bacterial levels and naturally occurring marine biotoxin concentrations. Additionally, shellfish may not be grown in areas contaminated with poisonous or deleterious substances causing the shellfish to be adulterated and unfit for human consumption. Commercial mariculture of Olympia oysters is permitted by ODA only in Netarts Bay and Yaquina Bay.
-- Oregon Department of Environmental Quality: DEQ's Water Quality Toxics Monitoring Program assesses Oregon's waters for pollutants and tests a variety of fish and shellfish species for several contaminants.
-- Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife: ODFW's mission is to protect and enhance Oregon's fish and wildlife and their habitats for use and enjoyment by present and future generations. ODFW prohibits recreational and commercial harvest of wild stocks of native Olympia oysters in Oregon due to the low population levels.

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BLM Extends Deadline for Nominations for Reclamation and Sustainable Mineral Development Awards
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 05/02/16 12:02 PM
The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has extended to May 31, 2016 the deadline for submitting nominations for the 2016 Reclamation and Sustainable Mineral Development Awards. The prior deadline was April 12.

These non-monetary awards highlight some of the finest examples of responsible mineral resource development and illustrate the principles of sustainable development without compromising the needs of future generations. The awards program also helps to promote successful ideas and practices that may be implemented at various locations throughout the nation.

"These awards honor achievements in environmental health, social responsibility, and economic security," said Michael Nedd, BLM Assistant Director for Energy, Minerals and Realty Management. "They also highlight mineral development that protects and restores the environment while meeting modern needs for these raw materials."
The awards fall under five categories: the Hardrock Mineral Environmental Award, the Hardrock Mineral Community Outreach and Economic Security Award, the Hardrock Mineral Small Operator Award, the Hardrock Mineral Directors Award, and the "Fix A Shaft Today!" Award.
The Hardrock Mineral Environmental Award recognizes efforts in environmental stewardship. This category recognizes achievements demonstrating continuous or repeated efforts to successfully meet or exceed Federal, State, or local reclamation requirements with minimal oversight.
The Hardrock Mineral Community Outreach and Economic Security Award recognizes projects that show concern for community responsibilities and the economic benefits of mineral development. This award recognizes successful coordination of projects with local and regional stakeholders. Projects that contribute to quality of life or show concern for a community's long-term health are also eligible.

The Hardrock Mineral Small Operator Award recognizes efforts in environmental stewardship of operators with fewer than 15 employees. Similar to the Hardrock Mineral Environmental Award, this award recognizes achievements demonstrating continuous or repeated efforts to successfully meet or exceed Federal, State, or local reclamation requirements with minimal oversight.
The Hardrock Mineral Director's Award recognizes outstanding achievement in a particular area of sustainable development. The award will recognize an operator whose dedication and commitment to excellence has resulted in the use of a new or innovative design or technique that allows or enhances successful operations in technically challenging conditions or in critical environmental settings.
The Fix A Shaft Today!"("FAST!") Award recognizes active participation in the FAST! Campaign, which is a partnership initiative aimed at eradicating unsafe abandoned mine land features, especially open mine shafts.
Nominations are to be submitted to the BLM State Office (Attention: Solid Minerals) that has jurisdiction in the State where the operation is located. It is anticipated that the presentation of the awards will take place in Las Vegas in the fall of 2016 in conjunction with MINExpo.

Mining companies, regulatory authorities, geologists, and members of the public may nominate operators or organizations in the non-coal solid minerals industries for an award. Nominations need not be limited to operations on land managed by the BLM. For detailed information on the nomination and selection processes, including the required format for nominations CLICK HERE: http://www.blm.gov/style/medialib/blm/wo/Communications_Directorate/public_affairs/news_release_attachments.Par.92208.File.dat/2016%20Sustain%20Final.pdf
Oregon Lottery launches new Loteria Scratch-it
Oregon Lottery - 05/02/16 8:33 AM
Just in time for Cinco de Mayo, the Oregon Lottery has launched its second Scratch-it ticket version of the well-known Mexican Bingo-style game, Loteria.

"This was a very popular Scratch-it last year, and it resonated well with all Oregonians, so we decided to bring it back again this year, new and improved," said Oregon Lottery Associate Marketing Communications Manager Thais Rodick. Loteria is a Mexican Bingo-style game played by family and friends in the Hispanic community. The Loteria Scratch-it ticket offers players a $10,000 top prize.

"Oregon's population is becoming increasingly diverse," said Rodick. "Currently, 12.3 percent of Oregonians are Hispanics, 4 percent are Asian American and Pacific Islanders, and 2 percent African American. We are broadening our product offerings to make sure our games remain relevant with our consumers, and the recent success of Loteria Scratch-it and our most recent Chinese New Year ticket illustrate that we're on the right track."

New versions of the Loteria Scratch-it will be available in the coming months incorporating themes like "Dia De Los Muertos" (Day of the Dead) and "Navidena" during the holidays.


Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $10 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org.

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Sun. 05/01/16
OSP Continuing Fatal Crash on I-84, Six Miles West of Arlington - Gilliam County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/01/16 8:43 PM
Photo
Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-05/1002/94032/thumb_1.JPG
On Sunday, May 1, 2016, at approximately 4:33 a.m., Oregon State Police (OSP) was notified of a single vehicle rollover crash which had occurred on Interstate 84 near milepost 132 westbound (six miles west of Arlington). Medical personnel from the Gilliam County Fire Department and Oregon State Police arrived and located two individuals who were both severely injured.

The driver was identified as Justin Matthew FLOWERS, age 24, from Portland, and the passenger, Hayden Michael SWANSON, age 23, from Portland. Life Flight transported FLOWERS to Kadlec Regional Medical Center in Richland, Washington and SWANSON was transported by ground ambulance to Mid-Columbia Medical Center in The Dalles. During transport to the hospital, FLOWERS succumbed to his injuries. After arrival at the hospital in The Dalles, SWANSON was also transported by Life Flight to OHSU in Portland, where he is in critical but stable condition.

The investigation revealed the vehicle, a 1999 Chevy C15 SUV, had been westbound on the interstate in the early morning hours, when for an unknown reasons it left the roadway, crashed through the north side guardrail and rolled down a rock embankment, coming to rest approximately 150 feet from the roadway. Preliminary information indicates that both FLOWERS and SWANSON had not been using their seat belts at the time of the crash and were ejected from the vehicle. Speed and fatigue are being considered to be contributing factors for the crash.

Oregon State Police was assisted by Gilliam County Ambulance, Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), Life flight, Richland Police Department and Benton County Washington Coroner's Office.


Attached Media Files: Photo