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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Fri. Apr. 12 - 3:59 am
Thu. 04/11/24
Fatal Crash - HWY 101 - Clatsop County
Oregon State Police - 04/11/24 2:54 PM

Clatsop County, Ore. 10 Apr. 24- On Wednesday, April 10, 2024, at 12:43 p.m., Oregon State Police responded to a three-vehicle crash on Hwy-101, near milepost 13, in Clatsop County.

The preliminary investigation indicated southbound traffic was stopped for a vehicle attempting to turn left onto Turlay Ln. A southbound Toyota Sienna, operated by David Timothy Schalk Jr. (53) of Astoria, crossed the double yellow line and began passing the stopped traffic in the northbound lane.  The Toyota struck the northbound guardrail and was redirected back into the northbound lane where it struck a northbound Dodge Ram 1500, operated by Marti Ree Lindhorst (68) of Salem. The collision caused the Dodge Ram to roll into the southbound lane and collide with a Kia Soul, operated by Tara Lynne Ragan (55) of Astoria, which was stopped in the southbound lane.

The operator of the Toyota (Schalk Jr.) was injured and transported to a local hospital. 

A passenger in the Toyota, Kaleb Allen Shaffer (48) of Warrenton, was declared deceased at the scene.

The operator of the Dodge (Lindhorst) was injured and transported to a local hospital.

The operator of the Kia (Ragan) and passenger, Wendy Lee Sides (53) of Seaside, were injured and transported to a local hospital. 

The highway was impacted for approximately 5.5 hours during the on-scene investigation. 

OSP was assisted by the Gearhart Police Department, Clatsop County Sheriff's Department, Warrenton Fire, and ODOT.

 

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About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Biden-Harris Administration delivers historic milestones, new actions for clean energy on public lands
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 04/11/24 2:14 PM

Finalized rule to further promote responsible solar and wind energy development on public lands, including through 80% lower fees


WASHINGTON — The Biden-Harris administration today announced a series of historic milestones and actions to promote responsible clean energy development on public lands and help achieve President Biden’s goal of creating a carbon pollution-free power sector by 2035.  

Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland today announced that the Department has now permitted more than 25 gigawatts of clean energy projects – surpassing a major milestone ahead of 2025 – enough clean energy to power more than 12 million homes across the country. This includes solar, wind and geothermal projects, as well as gen-tie lines on public lands that are essential for connecting clean electricity projects on both federal and non-federal land to the grid.

“Since Day One, the Biden-Harris administration has worked tirelessly to expand responsible clean energy development to address climate change, enhance America’s energy security and create good-paying union jobs. Surpassing our goal of permitting 25 gigawatts of clean energy by 2025 underscores the significant progress we have made in helping build modern, resilient climate infrastructure that protects our communities from the worsening impacts of climate change,” said Secretary Deb Haaland. “The Interior Department will continue to advance projects that will add enough clean energy to the grid to power millions more homes and help ensure a livable planet for future generations.”

The Department today also announced a final Renewable Energy rule from the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) that will lower consumer energy costs and the cost of developing solar and wind projects, improve renewable energy project application processes, and incentivize developers to continue responsibly developing solar and wind projects on public lands. Consistent with the Biden-Harris administration’s commitment to create high-quality jobs in the clean energy economy and support American manufacturing, the final rule includes additional incentives for use of project labor agreements and American-made materials.  

“Our public lands are playing a critical role in the clean energy transition,” said Acting Deputy Secretary Laura Daniel-Davis. “Finalizing the Renewable Energy Rule is a significant milestone that will allow the Interior Department to continue leading the way on renewable energy while furthering President Biden’s commitment to building a clean energy economy, tackling the climate crisis, protecting lands and waters, promoting American energy security, and creating jobs in communities across the country.”

In addition, the BLM announced that two solar projects – the Arica and Victory Pass projects in California – are now fully operational, adding 465 megawatts of clean electricity to the grid. With these two projects coming online, more than 10 gigawatts of clean energy are currently being generated on public lands, powering more than 5 million homes across the West.

“Renewable energy projects like Arica and Victory Pass on public lands create good-paying jobs and are crucial in achieving the Biden-Harris administration’s goal of a carbon pollution-free power sector by 2035,” said BLM Director Tracy Stone-Manning. “Investing in clean and reliable renewable energy represents the BLM's commitment to addressing climate change. BLM personnel are working tirelessly to efficiently review and approve projects, with significant and thoughtful engagement from states, Tribes and other partners, to ensure we supply families and communities with clean energy that will lower costs and help tackle climate change.”  

Surpassed President Biden’s Goal of 25 Gigawatts by 2025 
The Department and BLM have worked diligently to review and approve dozens of new clean energy projects, including solar, wind, and geothermal projects, as well as interconnected gen-tie lines that are vital to clean energy projects proposed on non-federal land.

Today’s announcement that the Department has surpassed the goal to permit 25 gigawatts of renewable energy includes the approval of more than double the number of projects than were approved during the previous Administration. The Department has now permitted nearly 29 gigawatts of clean energy – enough to power more than 12 million homes across the country. In addition to specific project approvals, the Department has also leased eight new areas in Solar Energy Zones with the capacity to generate nearly 2.5 gigawatts of additional clean energy.  

As the Department continues its momentum to spur a clean energy future, the BLM is currently processing permits for an additional 66 utility-scale clean energy projects proposed on public lands in the western United States. These projects have the combined potential to create thousands of good-paying jobs, add more than 32 additional gigawatts of renewable energy to the western electric grid and power millions of more homes. The BLM is also undertaking a preliminary review of about 200 applications for solar and wind development, as well as more than 100 applications for solar and wind energy site area testing. The BLM continues to track this clean energy permitting progress through an online dashboard.  

These investments in a clean energy future help further the President’s Bidenomics strategy and Investing in America agenda, which are growing the American economy from the middle out and bottom up – from rebuilding our nation’s infrastructure, to driving over half a trillion dollars in new private sector manufacturing and clean energy investments in the United States, to creating good-paying jobs and building a clean energy economy that will combat the climate crisis and make our communities more resilient.  

Finalized Renewable Energy Rule to Continue Responsible Development 
The Department today also announced the update of its renewable energy regulations to promote the development of solar and wind energy on public lands. The final Renewable Energy Rule will reduce capacity fees for these projects by 80 percent and facilitate development in priority areas by streamlining application review, delivering greater certainty for the private sector and the opportunity for more clean energy for American households.

The Energy Act of 2020 authorized the BLM to reduce acreage rents and capacity fees to promote the greatest use of wind and solar energy resources. The BLM initially reduced these fees through guidance in 2022. Today’s final rule codifies further reductions, improving financial predictability for developers pursuing long-term projects on public land.

The final Renewable Energy Rule will facilitate development in identified priority areas for wind and solar energy while maintaining appropriate flexibility to ensure a fair return for the use of public lands. It expands the BLM’s ability to accept leasing applications in these priority areas without first going through a full auction but retains the BLM’s ability to hold competitive auctions where appropriate.  

The final rule continues the Biden-Harris administration’s commitment to creating American manufacturing jobs while helping to build a clean energy economy, including by providing financial incentives for developers to use project labor agreements and domestic materials. The BLM sought comment on these additional incentives in last year’s proposed rule and developed the final provisions following public feedback, including from labor unions and a wide range of clean energy industry stakeholders.  

Today’s rule also complements the BLM’s ongoing efforts to advance responsible clean energy development by updating the Western Solar Plan. The BLM is currently taking comment on a draft analysis of the Utility-Scale Solar Energy Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, with the goal of streamlining the BLM’s framework for siting solar energy projects across the West in order to support current and future national clean energy goals, long-term energy security, climate resilience, and improved conservation outcomes.  

Announced California Solar Projects are Fully Operational 
In another step towards achieving President Biden’s vision of a fully carbon pollution-free power sector by 2035, the Department today announced the Arica and Victory Pass solar projects are both fully operational. These projects, the first two approved under the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan (DRECP), are located in eastern Riverside County, California. With the completion of these two solar projects, the BLM has also surpassed 10 gigawatts of renewable energy generation from projects on public lands.

The two projects represent a combined infrastructure investment of about $689 million, will generate $5.9 million in annual operational economic benefit, provide power to nearly 139,000 homes, and add up to 465 megawatts of clean energy generating capacity and 400 megawatts of battery storage. The Department issued final approval for construction of the Arica and Victory Pass solar projects in 2022.  

The DRECP is a landscape-level plan created in collaboration with the State of California for more than 22 million acres, focused on 10.8 million acres of public lands, in the desert regions of seven California counties that balances renewable energy development with the conservation of unique and valuable desert ecosystems and outdoor recreation opportunities. To approve these sites for renewable energy projects, the Department and the BLM worked with Tribal governments, local communities, state regulators, industry and other federal agencies.

The BLM today also announced the beginning of construction for the Camino Solar project in Kern County, California. The 44-megawatt solar photovoltaic facility is expected to power nearly 13,400 homes. The project will employ around 150 people during peak construction, include a 34.5-kV underground electrical collector line, and connect to the existing Southern California Edison Whirlwind Substation through the Manzana Wind Substation and associated 220 kV generation-tie line.

 

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 western states, including Alaska, on behalf of the American people. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Our mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.


Babies, baby chicks don't mix: OHA article highlights Salmonella risks of backyard poultry for newborns
Oregon Health Authority - 04/11/24 10:53 AM

EDITORS: Dr. Paul Cieslak of OHA is available for interviews until noon today. Contact OHA External Relations at PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov to set something up.

April 11, 2024

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Babies, baby chicks don’t mix: OHA article highlights Salmonella risks of backyard poultry for newborns

PORTLAND, Ore. — Outbreaks of Salmonella infection linked to backyard poultry have been well documented, but a recent Oregon public health investigation highlights the risks of home chicken flocks for newborn babies.

An Oregon Health Authority (OHA) report in today’s edition of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) details an investigation into a case of salmonellosis – the disease caused by Salmonella bacteria – in a newborn whose parents kept backyard poultry.

OHA and Crook County epidemiologists investigated the case as part of a routine, multi-state review of backyard poultry-associated salmonellosis outbreaks reported to CDC from across the country during 2023.

According to the report, the baby boy was born at a hospital about 150 miles away from his parents’ home. The newborn was discharged with his mother to a relative’s home the day after his birth, but four days later was readmitted to a second hospital with bloody stool and lethargy, prompting health care providers to collect a stool sample for analysis. The sample tested positive for a strain of Salmonella known as Thompson.

Neither parent had symptoms of salmonellosis, nor had they been diagnosed with the disease. However, the baby’s father, who tended the family’s backyard poultry at the family’s home 150 miles away, was present at the hospital during the child’s birth and stayed with the child and the child’s mother at the relative’s home when the baby fell ill.

The newborn had not traveled to the home where the backyard poultry were kept during the time between his birth and his hospital admission for his illness.

Nearly a month after the newborn was admitted to the hospital with salmonellosis symptoms, state and county epidemiologists collected environmental samples from the chicken bedding in the family’s backyard poultry coop, where the child’s father had previously had contact. Two of the samples matched the Salmonella Thompson strain found in the child.

Paul Cieslak, M.D., medical director for communicable diseases and immunizations at OHA’s Public Health Division and co-author of the MMWR article, said epidemiologists don’t know the exact mechanism by which the newborn was exposed to the Salmonella Thompson strain. But it’s telling that the newborn’s family started keeping backyard poultry only about a month before the child’s birth.

“It’s possible one of the parents was shedding the organism even though they weren’t showing symptoms and exposed the baby during or after his birth,” Cieslak said. “The bacteria also could have been carried from the family home to the newborn on clothes, shoes or other belongings. Once it’s on surfaces, it can be transported and transmitted fairly easily.”

The case is a strong reminder about the importance of hygiene when tending backyard poultry, “especially when persons at risk for exposure are newborns and young infants whose intestinal flora and immune systems are still developing,” the article’s authors wrote. “In addition to adhering to recommended hygiene practices, families contemplating raising backyard poultry should consider the potential risk to newborns and young infants living in the household.”

The CDC has the following recommendations for backyard flock owners:

  • Always wash hands with soap and water immediately after touching backyard poultry, their eggs or anything in the area where they live and roam. Use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not readily available. Consider having hand sanitizer at your coop.
  • Don’t kiss or snuggle backyard poultry, and don’t eat or drink around them. This can spread Salmonella germs to your mouth and make you sick. Keep your backyard flock and supplies you use to care for them (such as feed containers and shoes you wear in the coop) outside of the house. You should also clean the supplies outside the house.
  • Always supervise children around backyard poultry and make sure they wash their hands properly Don’t let children younger than 5 touch chicks, ducklings or other backyard poultry. Young children are more likely to get sick from germs such as Salmonella.
  • Collect eggs often. Eggs that sit in the nest can become dirty or break. Throw away cracked eggs. Germs on the shell can more easily enter the egg through a cracked shell. Rub off dirt on eggs with fine sandpaper, a brush, or a cloth. Don’t wash eggs because colder water can pull germs into the egg. Refrigerate eggs to keep them fresh and slow the growth of germs. Cook eggs until both the yolk and white are firm, and cook egg dishes to an internal temperature of 160°F to kill all germs.
  • Call your health care provider right away if you have any of these severe symptoms:
    • Diarrhea and a fever higher than 102°F.
    • Diarrhea for more than three days that is not improving.
    • Bloody diarrhea.
    • So much vomiting that you cannot keep liquids down.
    • Signs of dehydration, such as not peeing much, dry mouth and throat, and feeling dizzy when standing up.

The article’s lead author was Stephen Ladd-Wilson, Acute and Communicable Disease Prevention Section, OHA. Other co-authors included Karen Yeargain, Crook County Health Department; Samuel Myoda, Ph.D., and Mansour Samadpour, Ph.D., Institute for Environmental Health Laboratories, Seattle; and Karim Morey, Oregon State Public Health Laboratory, OHA.

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OHA study: No link between COVID-19 vaccine, cardiac deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 04/11/24 10:24 AM

EDITORS: Dr. Paul Cieslak of OHA is available for interviews until noon today. Contact OHA External Relations at PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov to set something up.

April 11, 2024

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

OHA study: No link between COVID-19 vaccine, cardiac deaths

Article published in CDC’s MMWR finds no deaths attributed to mRNA shots

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 vaccination is not linked to death from cardiac causes among previously healthy young people, according to an Oregon Health Authority (OHA) study published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The study, appearing today in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), examined nearly 1,300 deaths among Oregon adolescents and young adults – ages 16 to 30 – occurring over 19 months during 2021 and 2022. It found that none of the fatalities that happened within 100 days of receiving an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine dose was attributed to vaccination.

The findings answer a question that’s lingered since early 2021 as state and federal public health agencies rolled out new mRNA vaccines during the pandemic: Do rare cases of myocarditis associated with COVID-19 vaccination put people at increased risk for cardiac death?

Study co-authors Paul Cieslak, M.D., and Juventila Liko, M.D., M.P.H., of OHA’s Acute and Communicable Disease Prevention Section, say suggestions of an association between receipt of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine dose and sudden cardiac death among healthy adolescents and young adults are not supported by the Oregon data they reviewed.

“According to information recorded on death certificates, among 1,292 deaths of persons 16 to 30 years of age from June 2021 to December 2022, none was found to have been caused by COVID-19 vaccination,” said Cieslak, medical director for communicable diseases and immunizations.

Of 40 deaths that occurred among persons who had received an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine dose, only three occurred within 100 days after vaccination. However, two of the deaths were attributed to chronic underlying conditions, and the cause was undetermined for one. No death certificate attributed death to vaccination.

Cieslak noted there were 30 deaths among persons this age that were caused by COVID-19. Among these 30 decedents, he said, the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS) database had records for 22 (73%), only three of whom had received any COVID-19 vaccination.

“Studies have shown significant reductions in COVID-19-related mortality among vaccinated persons; during the first 2 years of COVID-19 vaccine availability in the United States, vaccination prevented an estimated 18.5 million hospitalizations and 3.2 million deaths,” Cieslak and Liko wrote in their report.

The researchers acknowledged two limitations in their findings.

First, they could not exclude the possibility of vaccine-associated cardiac deaths more than 100 days after COVID-19 vaccination. They also pointed out that published data indicate potential adverse events associated with vaccinations tend to occur within 42 days of vaccination.

Second, although nearly a million adolescents and young adults had received a COVID-19 vaccination during the period of the study, the research could not exclude a rarer event among vaccinees in this age group.

“Nevertheless,” Cieslak said, “it is clear that the risk, if any, of cardiac death linked to COVID-19 vaccination is very low, while the risk of dying from COVID-19 is real. We continue to recommend COVID-19 vaccination for all persons 6 months of age and older to prevent COVID-19 and complications, including death.”

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Owners of Local Debt Consolidation Service Indicted in Federal Court, Additional Victims Sought
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 04/11/24 9:55 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—The owners of ConsoliDebt Solutions, LLC, a debt consolidation service that operated in Oregon and other locations between April 2019 and April 2024, have been indicted in federal court for knowingly and intentionally defrauding their customers.

Javier Antonio Banuelas Urueta, 54, and Dalia Castilleja Saucedo, 38, both residents of Oregon and Washington State, have been charged in a seven-count indictment with conspiring to commit and committing mail and wire fraud.

According to the indictment, from approximately April 2019 and continuing until their arrests, Banuelas and Castilleja are alleged to have devised and carried out a scheme whereby they used ConsoliDebt Solutions to collect money and property from various clients in exchange for purported debt consolidation or reduction services. Banuelas and Castilleja directed their clients to deposit funds directly into ConsoliDebt bank accounts, transfer funds to the company, or mail in personal checks, cashier’s checks, or money orders. 

Banuelas and Castilleja are further alleged to have used client funds to pay for various personal expenses such as car leases, loan repayments, residential rent, and various wire transfers.

Banuelas was arrested Tuesday in Portland, Oregon. He made his first appearance in federal court the same day and was arraigned, pleaded not guilty, and ordered detained pending further court proceedings. Castilleja is still at large.

Mail and wire fraud are punishable by up to 20 years in federal prison and three years’ supervised release per count of conviction.

Anyone with information about Banuelas, Castilleja, or ConsoliDebt Solutions, LLC, are encouraged to contact Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) by submitting a tip online at  https://www.ice.gov/webform/ice-tip-form or by calling (866) 347-2423.

This case was investigated by HSI. It is being prosecuted by Rachel K. Sowray, Special Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

SOLVE's Oregon Spring Cleanup begins April 13: More than 100 Volunteer Opportunities are Open for Registration (Photo)
SOLVE - 04/11/24 9:34 AM
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Portland, Ore., April 11, 2024 – The Oregon Spring Cleanup, presented by Portland General Electric, kicks off this Saturday. From April 13 to April 22, more than 100 volunteer opportunities are open for registration in celebration of Earth Day. Families, community members, neighborhood associations, and environmental enthusiasts are invited to participate in the biggest event on SOLVE's annual calendar. 

Everyone is invited to join SOLVE, event leaders, and partners from across the Pacific Northwest in a collective celebration of Earth Day. The SOLVE calendar showcases a variety of events throughout Oregon and SW Washington between April 13 and April 22, with the majority of events culminating on April 20. Diverse initiatives address specific environmental needs with opportunities ranging from beach cleanups to neighborhood and city litter pickups. Further activities include restoring natural habitats through native tree and shrub plantings, weed pulls, and mulching projects. Each project contributes to the enhancement of our shared surroundings.

With over 100 projects to choose from, the Oregon Spring Cleanup invites enthusiastic volunteers to contribute to a cleaner, greener, and brighter planet. Interested individuals can browse the map of projects to find events near them, learn about each opportunity, and sign up for a meaningful contribution to the environment. Participating in the Oregon Spring Cleanup provides an excellent opportunity to bond with family members, coworkers, and neighbors, while collectively contributing to preserving some of Oregon's most stunning locations.

As SOLVE anticipates another successful event, valued partner Portland General Electric, shares their commitment to the cause: " PGE proudly supports SOLVE's efforts to make our communities cleaner and greener. In 2023, our employees and their families volunteered with SOLVE for more than 220 hours. We're excited to join community members again this Earth Day to help improve our beautiful state." said Kristen Sheeran, Senior Director of Policy Planning and Sustainability, Portland General Electric.

Anyone who cannot attend an Oregon Spring Cleanup event this year can support SOLVE by individual giving. A donation of any size will help SOLVE host more events year after year and provide volunteers with free supplies, event leader training, and all the support they need to run a successful event.

For more information, please visit www.solveoregon.org/oregon-spring and be part of the collective effort to create a cleaner, greener planet.

Along with Portland General Electric, other event sponsors include Clean Water Services, AAA Oregon/Idaho, Fred Meyer, Metro, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, KOIN, The Standard, Swire Coca-Cola, Holman, Demarini-Wilson, TriMet, and PepsiCo.

 

About SOLVE 

SOLVE is a statewide non-profit organization that brings people together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. Since 1969, the organization has grown from a small, grassroots group to a national model for volunteer action. Today, SOLVE mobilizes and trains tens of thousands of volunteers of all ages across Oregon and Southwest Washington to clean and restore our neighborhoods and natural areas and to build a legacy of stewardship for our state. Visit solveoregon.org for more information. 

 




Attached Media Files: 2024-04/6925/171435/2024-04-11_Oregon-Spring-Cleanup_-_Press_Release_-_Register_Now.pdf , 2024-04/6925/171435/4.22.23_OSCU-Cannon-Beach.jpg , 2024-04/6925/171435/4.22.23_OSCU-Pier-Park-removing-invasive-blackberries.jpg , 2024-04/6925/171435/4.22.23_OSCU_Canon_Beach_(2).jpg , 2024-04/6925/171435/4.22.23_OSCU-Shemanski-Park-PGE.jpg

Wed. 04/10/24
Board of Forestry hosts a planning retreat on April 24
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/10/24 4:03 PM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet April 24 for a planning retreat. The annual retreat offers the board and department leadership a chance to facilitate a final discussion about their shared strategic plan, the Vision for Oregon’s Forests and review the latest developments for the State Forests Trust of Oregon. 

No public comment or testimony will be accepted during the retreat. The public can attend in-person in the Tillamook Room, Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, located at 2600 State St. in Salem or observe via a livestream on the department’s YouTube page.

During this informal annual retreat, board members will focus on:

  • New Vision for Oregon’s Forests content
  • Goals, strategy and feedback review
  • State Forests Trust of Oregon update

View the agenda and retreat details. 

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200 or by email at estryinformation@odf.oregon.gov">forestryinformation@odf.oregon.gov.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. Read more information about the board.


Lane County Diesel Repair Shop and Shop Owner Plead Guilty to Clean Air Act Violations
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 04/10/24 4:00 PM

Shop and shop owner agree to pay criminal fines and complete terms of probation

EUGENE, Ore.—A Lane County, Oregon, diesel repair shop and its owner pleaded guilty today in federal court to knowingly and intentionally tampering with pollution monitoring devices on at least 184 vehicles in violation of the Clean Air Act.

Diesel & Offroad Authority, LLC, located in Veneta, Oregon, and its owner and operator, Christopher Paul Kaufman, 38, a resident of Veneta, pleaded guilty to tampering with pollution monitoring devices.

As part of their plea agreements, Diesel & Offroad Authority and Kaufman have agreed to pay $150,000 each in criminal fines and serve three years terms of probation. 

“Diesel & Offroad Authority and its owner put profits over our community’s health and safety by amplifying diesel engines’ noxious fumes,” said Nathan J. Lichvarcik, Chief of the U.S. Attorney’s Office Eugene and Medford Branch Offices. “We will continue working closely with our partners at EPA to hold accountable businesses that violate our nation’s environmental protection laws.”

“The defendants in this case illegally tampered with the onboard diagnostics systems and removed the emissions control components from hundreds of diesel trucks,” said Special Agent in Charge Lance Ehrig of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Criminal Investigation Division (EPA CID) in Oregon. “The pollution that results from vehicle emissions can lead to serious health conditions and has been linked to increased respiratory disease and childhood asthma. This guilty plea demonstrates that EPA will vigorously prosecute those who violate laws designed to protect our communities from harmful air pollution.”

According to court documents, beginning in at least 2018 and continuing through 2022, Diesel & Offroad authority tampered with and disabled emissions control systems of at least 184 diesel vehicles in violation of the Clean Air Act. Diesel & Offroad Authority charged its customers approximately $2,300 each for the emissions modifications and collected more than $378,000 for the unlawful services over an approximately four-year period.

As owner of Diesel & Offroad Authority, Kaufman oversaw and participated in the illegal modification of vehicles, including by procuring various automotive parts used in the process and engaging in and directing employees in the removal of emissions control equipment.

On March 12, 2024, Diesel & Offroad Authority and Kaufman were charged by federal criminal information with violating the Clean Air Act by tampering with pollution monitoring devices.

Diesel & Offroad Authority and Kaufman will be sentenced on July 17, 2024.

This case was investigated by EPA CID. It is being prosecuted by William M. McLaren, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

If you witness an environmental event that may lead to an immediate threat to human health or the environment, please call 9-1-1. After alerting local emergency authorities, please also report incidents to the EPA’s Report a Violation website (https://echo.epa.gov/report-environmental-violations) or by calling the National Response Center at 1-800-424-8802.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Western Oregon University rugby teams qualify for nationals (Photo)
Western Oregon University - 04/10/24 3:42 PM
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MONMOUTH, Ore. – Western Oregon University’s men's and women's+ rugby clubs have qualified for the Rugby 7s Collegiate National Championships

This is the first time both teams qualified in the same year, and the first time Western’s women's+ team has made it to the Rugby 7s national championships. The national tournament will be held in Boyds, Maryland between  April 26 - 28. 

To assist with travel costs, both teams are holding the following fundraisers. 

In-person fundraisers: 

  • Friday, April 12, from 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.,  stop by the Werner University  Center on Western’s campus to purchase a Western Rugby t-shirt, hoodie, sweat pants, or Rugby ball. All forms of payment are accepted. Due to construction, please check out our updated parking routes.
  • Sunday, April 14, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m., stop by Les Swab in Independence for a $15 car cleaning. All forms of payment are accepted.

Online fundraisers:

Western is currently the only institution across all divisions to have both men’s and women’s+ teams qualify this year.

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About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, established in Monmouth in 1856, proudly stands as Oregon's oldest public university. Hosting around 4,000 students, Western embodies a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution, with approximately 80% of its students hailing from within the state. Notably, its diverse student body comprises individuals from underrepresented backgrounds, veterans, and non-traditional learners. Western stands as the preferred campus in Oregon for those pursuing an enriching education within a nurturing, student-focused environment, characterized by faculty-led instruction.  Together we succeed.




Attached Media Files: 2024-04/1107/171417/Rugby_PR.png

Oregon State Fire Marshal issues grants to boost staffing ahead of wildfire season (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 04/10/24 12:36 PM
Molalla Fire responding to a call in 2023 with staff funded from last year's grant
Molalla Fire responding to a call in 2023 with staff funded from last year's grant
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SALEM, Ore. – To boost the number of firefighters across Oregon before wildfire season, the Oregon State Fire Marshal (OSFM) announced it has awarded $6 million in grants to 191 local fire agencies across the state. 

The 2024 Wildfire Season Staffing Grant program is in its third year. Local agencies in the Oregon structural fire service were eligible to apply for up to $35,000. The funding will allow agencies to bring on additional firefighters or increase on-duty hours during the 2024 fire season. A list of agencies awarded funding can be found here.

The 2023 Wildfire Season Staffing Grant program was integral to the success in protecting communities, adding more than 1,500 paid firefighters to the Oregon fire service. These added resources allowed agencies to attack fires and keep them small and away from communities and added capacity to respond to other calls, ultimately saving lives. Read about the successes here.

“The staffing grant program has been a huge success for the Oregon fire service and our district,” Sublimity Fire District Chief Alan Hume said. “It allowed us to staff our station during the busiest time of the year, which we previously couldn't do. This resulted in quicker responses with adequate staffing for not only our district, but our neighboring agencies. Last year we had several fires in our area with the potential to develop into larger, extended duration fires. We were able, as region, to keep those fires smaller.”

“This grant has provided us the ability to respond to all requests for emergency services, including automatic and mutual aid requests in our district,” Crooked River Ranch Rural Fire Protection District Chief Sean Hartley said. “This program is instrumental in keeping fires in our community small and allowed us to respond to multiple calls for service at the same time.”

This 2024 Wildfire Season Staffing Grant program is part of a multi-pronged approach to combat wildfire in Oregon. Over the last three years, the OSFM has made strategic investments to modernize the Oregon Fire Mutual Aid System and help communities become more wildfire adapted. 

This grant is part of the OSFM’s Response Ready Oregon initiative. The OSFM is looking for sustained funding for this program and is exploring all options to continue this highly successful grant in 2025 and beyond.

ABOUT RESPONSE READY OREGON

The OSFM’s Response Ready Oregon initiative was created to help boost capacity and modernize wildfire response within the Oregon Fire Mutual Aid System (OFMAS). The goal of Response Ready Oregon is to keep fires small and away from communities, reducing costly conflagrations.




Attached Media Files: Molalla Fire responding to a call in 2023 with staff funded from last year's grant

Crook County Fire and Rescue, Main Station Seismic Upgrade and Remodel
Crook Co. Fire and Rescue - 04/10/24 11:32 AM

Crook County Fire and Rescue is excited to announce it will be upgrading and remodeling the main station in Prineville, Oregon.  This project was made possible by a Seismic Rehabilitation Grant from the state of Oregon, and financing through the Special Public Works Fund, also through Business Oregon.  This is the first major upgrade to the main station since it was last remodeled in 2006.

The project will include individual sleeping quarters for crews, upgraded bathroom facilities, and an update to the kitchen.  It also will include health and wellness upgrades, allowing turnouts to be stored separately from the apparatus bay, keeping them separated from the diesel exhaust of the fire engines and ambulances.  A separate equipment cleaning room will also be added, allowing for the decon of equipment after a fire in a more appropriate location.  The exterior of the station will also look different in the end with siding and roof upgrades which will help strengthen the station and make it more resilient during a natural disaster. 

Construction is slated to begin the end of April, and is scheduled to be completed by November 1st of this year. The district will be operating out of a temporary facility within the city limits, and 24-hour service will be maintained throughout the duration of the project.  The district does not anticipate any interruption in service to the community during this time. 

The district’s general business line, 541-447-5011, will still be functioning and in-person service can be made at the district’s annex building located at 205 NE 4th Street, Prineville, Oregon.  For community members needing to mail items to the district, the mailing address will remain the same at 500 NE Belknap Street, Prineville, Oregon.  For questions, please contact Fire Chief Matt Smith, or Division Chief Russell Deboodt.

The district would like to thank Business Oregon for their help and guidance through this process, as well as our local partners, the City of Prineville and Crook County for their support for this project.




Attached Media Files: 2024-04/6932/171398/Press_Release_Station_Photo.pdf

Ten million in grant dollars help to create resilience in Oregon communities
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 04/10/24 10:12 AM

(Salem) – Forest fires, heat domes, landslides, floods, drought, pandemics -- all natural disasters that kill thousands of people and destroy billions of dollars of property and habitat each year. That’s why it’s important that each community builds up its resilience to these hazards. 

Now, there is help for Oregon’s many communities. The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) Office of Resilience and Emergency Management (OREM) has a $10 million grant called the Resilience Hubs and Networks Grant to give out to eligible people and organizations. The funding comes from the 2023 Oregon Legislature to build resiliency within communities. 

This grant money is part of a long-term goal of having our communities create resiliency so they can prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters. With this grant a community can design what they need to be resilient,” Ed Flick, OREM Director said.

Applicants could be just about anyone -- schools, cities, counties, non-profits, Tribes -- if they can show how the funding would benefit their community. We’d like to get grant dollars out to populations and areas of Oregon that are not as prepared for climate impacts. Many rural and frontier communities don’t have the tools and resources as larger cities,” Jenn Bosch, OREM Grants Program Administrator, said. 

"A Resilience Hub is a living, breathing part of the community already, such as a community center, a Boys and Girls Club, something that is part of their daily life, like a food bank. It’s place they would think to go to get help, such as shelter in an emergency. What they can apply for is very open,” Bosch said. 

The things people and groups could apply for includes almost anything that would build and strengthen the communities’ resilience, such as medical supplies, child care, emergency communications equipment, generators, training, water purification, vehicles and more. It also includes things communities can apply for called “typed packages.” These packages are those big containers often used for storage, called Conex boxes. OREM will pack the Conex containers with emergency supplies specific to sheltering in-place or enduring a disaster until further relief arrives, and OREM will deliver to that site. 

The network part of the grant is to help communities communicate and share resources more effectively. 

“The goal is to break down silos. Here’s an example of what this is - Government doesn’t generally set up shelters – it’s the churches, non-profits and community groups. But often they don’t know what the group down the street is doing. We’re asking them to work together to apply for the grant. Let’s say church is opening shelter but they don’t have food, but in working together with other community groups, they would then know the food bank might have food ready to supply to them,” Bosch said.  

Last July through December, Bosch with Spencer Karel, OREM Policy Chief, and partner in the grant process, traveled Oregon on a listening tour. They met in-person or virtually with more than 80 community groups, ODHS programs, Oregon Health Authority, Oregon Department of Energy and other state agencies. 

“We wanted to hear from them. It was an amazing opportunity to build the grant and really make it work for the communities. A Resiliency Hub in Grants Pass will look different than one in Wheeler, and those will also look different from one in Tillamook. We’re hopeful that the applications will reflect the broad need,” Bosch said. 

She stressed that applying for this grant is easy. The application is a like a survey that the applicant can fill in what they are requesting, with six essay questions. OREM is also partnering with Portland State University to assist applicants that need help completing their application. Information about this help can be found on the OREM website. 

“We want to make sure the people who generally don’t apply for or get grants feel like they have a fair opportunity to potentially receive a grant this time – small, rural, frontier areas especially,” she said. 

So far there are more than 65 applicants for the grant money. Applications close April 30. 

Just to sum up why this grant money to create resiliency is important for communities throughout Oregon, Bosch said, “It saves lives and saves money.” 

To learn more about the Resilience Hubs and Networks Grant and to find the application, visit: https://www.oregon.gov/odhs/emergency-management/Pages/resilience-grants.aspx.

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DPSST Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee Meeting 05-14-2024 Cancelled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/10/24 8:25 AM

PRIVATE SECURITY/INVESTIGATOR POLICY COMMITTEE

MEETING CANCELLED

 

Notice of Meeting Cancellation

The Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training meeting scheduled for May 14th, 2024, at 1:30 p.m. has been cancelled.

The next Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee meeting is scheduled for August 20, 2024, at 1:30pm.


Tue. 04/09/24
Fatal Crash - HWY 260 - Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 04/09/24 4:30 PM

Josephine County, Ore. 8 Apr. 24- On Monday, April 8, 2024, at 6:05 p.m., Oregon State Police responded to a single-vehicle crash on Hwy 260, near milepost 20, in Josephine County.

The preliminary investigation indicated an eastbound Dodge Ram 2500, operated by David Scott Anderson (39) of Wilderville, left the roadway for unknown reasons, struck trees, and overturned. 

The operator of the Dodge (Anderson) and passenger, Shelby Mckenzie Spliethof (28) of Wilderville, were both declared deceased at the scene.

The highway was impacted for approximately three hours during the on-scene investigation. 

 

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About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Internet Crimes Against Children Unit Arrest La Pine Man (Photo)
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office - 04/09/24 2:40 PM
Media Release
Media Release
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Released by: Sergeant Jason Wall

Release Date: April 9, 2024

Location: 50000 Block of Center Drive, La Pine, OR

 Arrested: Martin Adler, 59-year-old male, La Pine, OR

Charges: ORS 163.684 Encouraging Child Sexual Abuse in the First Degree (8 counts), ORS 163.686 Encouraging Child Sexual Abuse in the Second Degree (8 counts), ORS 475.894 Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine (Felony).

Narrative:

On February 22nd, 2024, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office received multiple Cybertips from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC). Detectives learned through the Cybertips a cloud-based storage account within Deschutes County, was uploading Child Sexual Abuse Material.

Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) detectives initiated an investigation and determined that the owner of the cloud-based storage account was Martin Adler of La Pine. 

On April 9th, 2024, Detectives with the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office ICAC unit, as well as detectives with the Street Crimes unit, Digital Forensics unit, and Oregon State Police ICAC detectives served a search warrant at Adler’s residence. 

Several digital devices were seized from the residence. A felony amount of methamphetamine was located during the search warrant and was seized as well. Adler was placed under arrest, transported to the Deschutes County Adult Jail, and booked on the aforementioned charges.

Further search warrants will be sought for the analysis of the seized digital devices, which may result in future charges being filed.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full-service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 259 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 193 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County. 




Attached Media Files: Media Release

Make an appointment now to help save lives during National Volunteer Month
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 04/09/24 12:21 PM

                                     Spring into action: Give blood or platelets with the Red Cross 

Make an appointment now to help save lives during National Volunteer Month

Portland, OR (April 9, 2024) — During National Volunteer Month in April, the American Red Cross asks donors to help protect the blood supply by making and keeping blood or platelet donation appointments in the weeks ahead. Donors of all blood types – especially type O blood donors and those giving platelets – are needed now to keep the blood supply strong enough to support critical patient care this spring.

The Red Cross depends on thousands of volunteer blood donors to collect about 12,000 blood donations every single day. With no substitute for blood and no way to manufacture it, volunteer donors are essential in transfusion care. Blood drives and donation centers also depend on the generosity and valuable time of those who make it possible for the Red Cross to help people in need. 

Spring into action – book a time to give lifesaving blood or platelets now by visiting RedCrossBlood.org, calling 1-800-RED CROSS or by using the Red Cross Blood Donor App. Those who come to give April 8-28, 2024, will receive a $10 e-gift card to a merchant of choice, plus be automatically entered to win a $7,000 gift card. There will be two lucky winners. See RedCrossBlood.org/Spring for details. 

 

Upcoming blood donation opportunities April 10-28

 

April 10 

Blood Donation Center, 3131 N Vancouver Ave., Portland, OR, 11:30 AM - 5:30 PM

Koin Tower, 222 SW Columbia St., Portland, OR, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Eastmoreland Golf Course, 2425 SE Bybee Blvd., Portland, OR, 12:30 PM - 5:30 PM

 

April 11

Prescott Apartments, 1450 N Prescott St., Portland, OR, 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM

OHSU Rood Family Pavilion, 3410 S Bond Ave., Portland, OR, 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM

 

April 14

Blood Donation Center, 1174 Progress Drive Suite 102, Medford, OR, 7:00 AM - 3:00 PM

 

April 15

Sunset Presbyterian Church, 14986 NW Cornell Rd., Portland, OR, 1:30 PM - 7:00 PM

Elks Lodge 1989, 3464 SW 106th Ave., Beaverton, OR, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Fred Meyer Store, 3805 SE Hawthorne, Portland, OR, 11:00 AM - 4:00 PM

King's Way Christian Schools, 3606 NE 78th St., Vancouver, WA, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Lausmann Annex, 200 S Ivy St., Medford, OR, 9:30 AM - 3:00 PM

Crater High School Upper Gym, 4410 Rogue Valey Hwy., Central Point, OR, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Pilot Butte Station, 425 NE 15th St., Bend, OR, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

 

April 16

OHSU Beaverton, 15700 SW Greystone Ct., Beaverton, OR, 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Reed College, 3203 SE Woodstock Blvd., Portland, OR, 11:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Lake Grove Presbyterian Church, 4040 Sunset Dr., Lake Oswego, OR, 1:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 3550 W 18th Ave., Eugene, OR, 1:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Eagle Point High School, 203 N. Platt St., Eagle Point, OR, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

 

April 17

LDS - Mtn View Ward, 1260 NE Thompson, Bend, OR, 1:00 PM - 6:00 PM

 

April 19

Pioneer Place, 700 SW 5th Ave., Portland, OR, 11:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Smile Station, 8210 SE 13th Ave., Portland, OR, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Reedwood Friends Church, 2901 SE Steele St., Portland, OR, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Blood Donation Center, 1174 Progress Drive Suite 102, Medford, OR, 7:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Ascension Lutheran Church, 675 Black Oak Dr., Medford, OR, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

 

April 22

Blood Donation Center, 815 SW Bond Street Suite 110, Bend, OR, 11:00 AM - 7:00 PM

 

April 23

Tektronix Fitness Center, 14053 SW Karl Braun Dr., Beaverton, OR, 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Willamette View, 12705 SE River Rd., Milwaukie, OR, 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM

VA Medical Center Portland, 3710 SW US Veterans Hospital Rd., Portland, OR, 8:30 AM - 2:00 PM

 

April 24

Cleveland High School, 3400 SE 26th Ave., Portland, OR, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Westside Community Church, 18390 SW Farmington Rd., Beaverton, OR, 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Keller Williams Realty, 9755 SW Barnes Rd., Portland, OR, 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM

 

April 25

Baja Fresh, 17805 SW 65th Ave., Lake Oswego, OR, 11:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Marquis Companies, 4560 SE International Way, Portland, OR, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Beaverton Library, 12375 SW 5th St., Beaverton, OR, 11:30 AM - 4:30 PM

 

April 28

Platelet Donation Center, 3131 N Vancouver Ave., Portland, OR, 6:30 AM - 1:15 PM

 

Visit RedCrossBlood.org and enter your zip code to find additional blood donation opportunities near you.

  

How to donate blood

Simply download the American Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit RedCrossBlood.org, call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or enable the Blood Donor Skill on any Alexa Echo device to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age in most states (16 with parental consent where allowed by state law), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

Blood and platelet donors can save time at their next donation by using RapidPass® to complete their pre-donation reading and health history questionnaire online, on the day of their donation, before arriving at the blood drive. To get started, follow the instructions at RedCrossBlood.org/RapidPass or use the Blood Donor App.

 

Amplify your impact − volunteer! 

Another way to support the lifesaving mission of the Red Cross is to become a volunteer blood donor ambassador at Red Cross blood drives. Blood donor ambassadors help greet, check in and thank blood donors to ensure they have a positive donation experience. 

Volunteers can also serve as transportation specialists, playing a vital role in ensuring lifesaving blood products are delivered to nearby hospitals. For more information and to apply for either position, visit redcross.org/volunteertoday

 

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation’s blood and is the primary blood supplier to 65 hospitals throughout Washington and Oregon; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members and their families. The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or follow us on social media.

 

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Oregon OSHA and partners to put spotlight on workplace safety and health in Pendleton, offering learning opportunities for workers and employers (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 04/09/24 11:36 AM
Blue Mountain conference image
Blue Mountain conference image
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Salem – A two-day event in Pendleton will offer employers and workers multiple learning opportunities that will help them make their job sites safer and healthier. Topics include everything from how to improve your safety culture and worker well-being to safety committees and how to address the most common chemical hazards in your workplace.

The 16th annual Blue Mountain Occupational Safety and Health Conference, which will be held June 3-4 at the Pendleton Convention Center, will also feature learning sessions in Spanish. Employers are encouraged to take advantage of those sessions by sending staff members who would prefer to gain important safety and health knowledge in Spanish.

The conference is a collaborative effort by Oregon Occupational Safety and Health (Oregon OSHA) – a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services – Oregon SHARP Alliance, and employers and employees in northeast Oregon.

On Tuesday, June 4, the keynote presentation, “Dominoes, Just Don’t Watch Them Fall,” features safety motivational speakers Brad and Delores Gardner of Helping Hand Presentations. More than a decade ago, Brad lost his right arm in a workplace accident. The accident did not have to happen. The couple will share their story to help people prevent such tragedies and to inspire them to see safety in a new light. 

The two-day event, which includes several pre-conference workshops, offers an extended slate of topics in Spanish. On Monday, June 3, workers who prefer to learn important safety and health information in Spanish will have many topics to choose from. Topics include hazard identification, slips, trips, and falls, fall protection, chemical safety, lockout/tagout, and machine guarding.   

Additional conference topics include:

  • Introduction to Occupational Medicine
  • I’m on the Safety Committee, Now What?
  • Critical Incident Stress Management
  • Oregon OSHA’s Heat and Wildfire Smoke Rules
  • Worker Well-Being in Five Easy Steps
  • What Is Your Safety Culture? How Do You Take It to the Next Level?
  • Situational Thinking
  • Safe Forklift Operations: Managing a Successful Program
  • Is It Luck or Is It PSM? The Elements of Process Safety Management

Registration for the pre-conference workshops on Monday, June 3, is $50. Registration for the conference on Tuesday, June 4, is $115, which includes lunch. To register, go to safetyseries.cventevents.com/blue24.

 

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.oregon.gov/dcbs/.




Attached Media Files: Blue Mountain conference image , DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo

2024 Oregon Heritage Tree Award Winners Announced
Oregon Travel Information Council - 04/09/24 10:00 AM

The Travel Information Council and its volunteer Oregon Heritage Tree Committee are pleased to announce the 2024 Oregon Heritage Tree Award winners. 

“The award recipients have done an exceptional job engaging communities about the importance of trees and raising awareness about Oregon’s history told through trees and forests,” said Oregon Heritage Tree Committee Chair Craig Leech. “The recipients range from volunteers to professionals who use their time and talents to better our communities.”

Maynard Drawson Memorial Award

The Maynard Drawson Memorial Award was created to honor a native of Oregon and a veteran of World War II who was best known as a tree advocate. Drawson led a campaign in the 1970s to preserve the Valley of the Giants, and in 1995 helped launch the Oregon Heritage Tree Program, the first state-sponsored heritage tree program in the country. This award recognizes exceptional, meritorious, and extraordinary work promoting the appreciation of trees over an extended period. 

2024 Winner

  1. Phyllis Reynolds of Portland for being a founding member of the Portland Heritage Tree Program, a published author, including two editions of Trees of Greater Portland and Hoyt Arboretum, It’s Story, a long-time urban Forestry Commissioner for the City of Portland, and close friend of Hoyt Arboretum. Phyllis has inspired generations of tree advocates through her books and volunteerism.

Heritage Tree Heroes of the Year Award

The Heritage Tree Heros of the Year Award recognizes individuals and groups who are engaging communities through education about the importance of trees and raising awareness about Oregon’s history told through trees and forests. 

2024 Winners:

  1. Giana Bernardini of Philomath for being the driving force behind the creation of the City of Philomath’s Heritage Tree Program.
  2. Nancy Broshot of Oregon City for leading the revision of municipal code to remove the arborist report requirement for Heritage Tree status and making the program more accessible to community members.
  3. Mike Oxendine of Talent for his tireless commitment to assisting heritage tree projects including Hiroshima Peace Tree plantings and assessing heritage tree health.

Award winners will be honored at local events in April during Arbor Month. 

The Oregon Heritage Tree Program is the first state-sponsored heritage tree program in the country. It was established in 1995 to increase public awareness of the important contribution of trees to Oregon’s history and the significant role they play in the quality of our daily life. The program is administered by the Oregon Travel Information Council and a committee of dedicated volunteers from across the state. For more information regarding the Heritage Tree program visit www.oregontic.com/oregon-heritage-trees


Scientific illustrator selected as Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument Artist-in-Residence (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 04/09/24 9:40 AM

Medford, Ore. — Bureau of Land Management leaders are thrilled to introduce Serena Richelle as the 2024 Artist-in-Residence at Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument. Richelle is a gifted scientific illustrator. She combines science and art to raise awareness about the relationships that exist between species, their importance, their endangerment, and what we can do to preserve them.


The prestigious Artist-in-Residence program invites talented creators to immerse themselves in the breathtaking natural beauty of the monument and create works that celebrate its unique landscapes, wildlife, and cultural heritage.
 

“I am so excited by the opportunity to be inspired by and make art about the Cascade Siskiyou National Monument’s unique ecology,” said Richelle. “This is a dream come true and I look forward to every part of this adventure.”
 

Richelle will spend two-weeks in the Monument this June. She’ll be surrounded by the lush forests, rugged mountains, and pristine waters that define this remarkable landscape. She will have the opportunity to explore the monument, sketch, paint, and create in an environment that inspires creativity. You can follow Richelle on Instagram @serena_richelle. 
 

As part of her residency, Richelle will host a public presentation. Additional information about the presentation will be available in the coming weeks. Samples of Richelle’s completed artwork will become part of CSNM’s collection, contributing to the ongoing dialogue about the intersection of art, conservation, and public lands.
 

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 western states, including Alaska, on behalf of the American people. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Our mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.




Attached Media Files: Courtesy of Serena Richelle , Courtesy of Serena Richelle

Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission to meet April 23-24 in Cannon Beach
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 04/09/24 8:20 AM

CANNON BEACH, Oregon — The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission will convene April 23 and 24 in Cannon Beach, Oregon. 

On April 23, commissioners will hold a work session on recreational grants and authorities of the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission 1 to 4 p.m.

On April 24, commissioners will convene an executive session at 8:30 a.m. at Tolovana Inn, 3400 S Hemlock Street, to discuss acquisition priorities and opportunities and potential litigation. Executive sessions are closed to the public. A business meeting will begin at 10 a.m. in the same location and will be open to the public.

Anyone may attend or listen to the business meeting; instructions on how to listen will be posted on the commission web page prior to the meeting. The business meeting includes time for informal public comment related to any items not on the agenda. Registration is required to speak at the meeting if attending online, and is available online at bit.ly/registerapr2024commission. The deadline to register to speak at the meeting virtually is 5 p.m. April 19. No advance registration is required to speak in person at the meeting. Time per speaker is limited to three minutes. Please submit written public comments by 5 p.m. April 19 to is.havel@oprd.oregon.gov">chris.havel@oprd.oregon.gov

The full agenda and supporting documents are posted on the commission web page. Notable requests: 

Anyone needing special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Denise Warburton, commission assistant, at least three days in advance: burton@oprd.oregon.gov">denise.warburton@oprd.oregon.gov or 503-779-9729. 

The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission promotes outdoor recreation and heritage by establishing policies, adopting rules and setting the budget for the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. The seven members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. They serve four-year terms and meet several times a year at locations across the state. 


Mon. 04/08/24
Oregon Lottery Announces Location Where $1.326 Billion Winning Powerball Ticket was Sold
Oregon Lottery - 04/08/24 4:50 PM

Salem, Ore. The lucky ticket matching all six Powerball numbers in Saturday’s $1.326 billion Powerball jackpot was sold at the Plaid Pantry at 6060 NE Columbia Boulevard in Portland. That store will receive a bonus of $100,000 for selling the jackpot winner. 

Additionally, Oregon Lottery is working with a ticket holder who came forward on Monday to claim the prize. The process involves security measures and vetting that will take time before a winner can be announced. 

“This is an unprecedented jackpot win for Oregon Lottery,” said Oregon Lottery Director Mike Wells. “We're taking every precaution to verify the winner before awarding the prize money, which will take time.” 

This was the fourth largest Powerball jackpot in history, and the eight largest among U.S. jackpot games. 

Plaid Pantry has sold other large Oregon Lottery jackpot prizes, including a $3.3 million Megabucks jackpot last summer. 

“Plaid Pantry is thrilled to learn that one of our 104 Oregon stores sold the $1.3 billion dollar Powerball ticket,” said Plaid Pantry President and CEO Jonathan Polonsky. “This store is one of our newest and most loved stores. Proceeds from the Oregon Lottery fund many programs that benefit everyone in the state, and we’ve been a proud partner with the Oregon Lottery since the very beginning. Congratulations to our lucky customer from our over 700 Plaid associates!”

Media are invited to a briefing Tuesday with representatives of Oregon Lottery and Plaid Pantry available to answer questions. 

WHEN: Tuesday, April 9, 12:30 p.m.  

WHERE: Parking lot of Plaid Pantry at 6060 NE Columbia Boulevard, Portland

WHAT: External Communications Program Manager Melanie Mesaros and Plaid Pantry President and CEO Jonathan Polonsky will be available to answer questions and media can obtain video/b-roll of retailer. 

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Douglas A. Olson Named Special Agent in Charge of the Portland Field Office (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 04/08/24 3:00 PM
SAC Douglas A. Olson
SAC Douglas A. Olson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-04/3585/171348/thumb_SAC_Olson.Douglas_portrait_2024-2515.jpg

FBI Director Christopher Wray has named Douglas A. Olson as the special agent in charge of the Portland Field Office in Oregon. Mr. Olson most recently served as a section chief in the Criminal Investigative Division at FBI Headquarters in Washington, D.C.

Mr. Olson joined the FBI as a special agent in 2003 and was assigned to the Greensboro Resident Agency of the Charlotte Field Office in North Carolina. He worked a variety of criminal and national security matters, including violent crime, white-collar crime, and counterterrorism investigations. In 2006, Mr. Olson transferred to the New York Field Office and investigated organized crime. He was recognized for his efforts investigating members of the Genovese Organized Crime family.

In 2009, Mr. Olson was promoted to supervisory special agent and reported to FBI Headquarters as the program manager of the Eurasian Organized Crime Unit of the Criminal Investigative Division. During this time, he helped establish five new assistant legal attaché positions focused on criminal matters. Mr. Olson was selected in 2013 to serve as the supervisory senior resident agent of the Salem Resident Agency of the Portland Field Office and was responsible for all FBI programs in Salem.

Mr. Olson was promoted to assistant legal attaché in 2016 and served in the Stockholm suboffice of the FBI’s legal attaché office in Copenhagen, Denmark. He received an Attorney General Award for his work to further the interests of U.S. national security.

In 2019, Mr. Olson was named an assistant special agent in charge of the Pittsburgh Field Office, where he was responsible for the cyber, counterintelligence, intelligence, and mission support programs. He was promoted in 2022 to chief of the Operational Support Section of the Criminal Investigative Division at Headquarters.

Mr. Olson earned a bachelor’s degree in business management from Virginia Polytechnic State University. Prior to joining the FBI, he served in the U.S. Marine Corps as a scout-sniper platoon commander and intelligence officer.

https://www.fbi.gov/news/press-releases/douglas-a-olson-named-special-agent-in-charge-of-the-portland-field-office




Attached Media Files: SAC Douglas A. Olson

Fatal Crash -- Interstate 5 -- Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 04/08/24 1:53 PM

DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. 8 April 2024 – On Saturday, April 6, 2024, at approximately 2 p.m., Oregon State Police responded to a single-vehicle crash on I-5 southbound near milepost 125 in Douglas County. 

The preliminary investigation indicated that a blue Chevrolet S-10 was traveling southbound when an object flew out of the back of the truck bed. The driver, Evan Nile Cookman (70) of Winston, pulled onto the right shoulder and exited the vehicle. While attempting to retrieve the object from the interstate, he fell into the left lane of traffic. A black Ford F-550 traveling in the left lane attempted to avoid the subject (Cookman); however, was unable to avoid a collision and struck Cookman. 

Cookman was pronounced deceased at the scene. 

OSP was assisted by the Roseburg Fire Department, Douglas County Medical Examiner’s Office, and the Oregon Department of Transportation. 

# # #

 

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Fatal Crash -- Hwy. 38 -- Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 04/08/24 1:50 PM

DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. 8 April 2024 – On Saturday, April 6, 2024, at approximately 5:26 p.m., Oregon State Police responded to a single-vehicle crash on Hwy. 38 near milepost 30.5 in Douglas County. 

The preliminary investigation indicated that a black Harley Davidson motorcycle was traveling eastbound when the operator lost control while negotiating a curve. The motorcycle struck the guardrail before coming to an uncontrolled rest in the westbound lane of travel. Multiple motorists stopped and rendered first aid prior to the arrival of emergency services. 

The motorcycle operator, Christopher Rein Schuerger (40) of Springfield, was pronounced deceased at the scene despite life-saving measures by a responding trooper and good Samaritans. 

Speed and wet roadway conditions contributed to the crash. 

OSP was assisted by the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Medical Examiner’s Office, North Douglas Ambulance, Elkton Fire Department, and the Oregon Department of Transportation. 

 

# # #

 

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Oregon Department of Early Learning and Care Celebrates the Week of the Young Child
Ore. Dept. of Early Learning and Care - 04/08/24 12:56 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 

 

April 8, 2024 

 

Contact: 

Kate Gonsalves, (503) 428-7292 

delc.media@delc.oregon.gov 

 

 

Oregon Department of Early Learning and Care Celebrates the  
Week of the Young Child 

 

SALEM, ORE. - The Oregon Department of Early Learning and Care (DELC) joins partners across the country in celebrating the Week of the Young Child. The annual event sponsored by the National Association for the Education of Young Children helps to build awareness about the needs of young children and their families. The week also helps focus attention on the early learning professionals and programs meeting those needs. In Oregon, Governor Tina Kotek issued a statewide proclamation officially designating the Week of the Young Child as April 6-12, 2024. 

 “We are grateful to Governor Tina Kotek for recognizing the Week of the Young Child and for elevating the importance of the earliest years for children and families,” said DELC Director Alyssa Chatterjee. “As we build a coordinated erly childhood system where all children, families, early care and education professionals are supported and empowered to thrive we are proud to recognize this week to celebrate young children and the transformational impact of early learning and care.” 

 Each day during the celebratory week, there will be multiple themes highlighting early learning, young children, their families, and early learning professionals. DELC is currently spotlighting these daily themes and information over social media. To share pictures and stories about your family use the hashtag #WOYC24 and tag DELC’s social media pages. 

For more information on Week of the Young Child®, visit naeyc. Learn more about the importance of early childhood education in Oregon: Oregon.gov/DELC. 

 

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About the Oregon Department of Early Learning and Care 

The Department of Early Learning and Care’s mission is to foster coordinated, culturally appropriate, and family-centered services that recognize and respect the strengths and needs of all children, families, and early learning and care professionals. More information about DELC is available at Oregon.gov/DELC. You can also connect with DELC on Facebook or sign up for news alerts and updates. 


OHCS awards more than $40 million to build and preserve over 400 affordable homes (Photo)
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 04/08/24 12:11 PM
Award-funded housing development, Colonia del Valle Próspero, in Albany, Oregon. Photo courtesy of SERA Design and Architecture
Award-funded housing development, Colonia del Valle Próspero, in Albany, Oregon. Photo courtesy of SERA Design and Architecture
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One housing development expected to create 30 homes in a Tribal community 

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) announces funding awards of more than $40 million in grants and tax credits to build and preserve 417 homes. The resources come from the federal 9% Low-Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC), HOME, General Housing Account Program (GHAP), and the Oregon Affordable Housing Tax Credits (OAHTC). These resources are used along with local, state, and private investments to make possible the development of affordable housing in communities across Oregon.

“This progress is about what really matters—putting resources towards investments that make life better for more Oregonians,” said OHCS Director Andrea Bell. “Over 400 families and individuals will have a safe and stable place to call home because of these investments and the leadership of our local partners who made this possible. This progress can invigorate neighborhoods, communities, and our economies. These investments in housing today will serve Oregonians for generations to come especially in our rural and Tribal communities.”

These investments also contribute to the five-year Statewide Housing Plan (July 2019-July 2024) goal of increasing the pipeline of affordable rental housing. OHCS surpassed the goal of adding 25,000 homes to the pipeline and has met this goal at around 107% of the target as of the end of 2023. The agency will release the outcomes of the Statewide Housing Plan this summer.

The latest investments for the creation affordable rental housing in Oregon were approved last week by the Oregon Housing Stability Council (HSC). Below is a list of the developments and further details can be found in the HSC meeting materials.

Development

Location

 

Homes (units)

Total Funding

 

Allen Creek Crossing Grants Pass

68

 

$4.5 million 
ALSO Apartments Gresham

39

 

$4.8 million
Burlwood ApartmentsPortland35

$947,442

 

Colonia del Valle Próspero Albany

54

 

$5 million
Klamath LIHTC #1Chiloquin

30

 

$4.6 million
Majestic Garden ApartmentsRedmond, Veneta, Harrisburg, Junction City (Scattered Sites)66$5.7 million
Nine PeaksBend45$10 million
Voyager’s VillageSalem

41

 

$2.6 million
Wickiup Station ApartmentsLa Pine39$4.1 million

comunicado de prensa en español

About Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS)

OHCS is Oregon's housing finance agency. The state agency provides financial and program support to create and preserve opportunities for quality, affordable housing for Oregonians of low and moderate income. OHCS administers programs that provide housing stabilization. OHCS delivers these programs primarily through grants, contracts, and loan agreements with local partners and community-based providers. For more information, please visit: oregon.gov/ohcs.




Attached Media Files: Award-funded housing development, Colonia del Valle Próspero, in Albany, Oregon. Photo courtesy of SERA Design and Architecture

DPSST Corrections Policy Committee Meeting 05-08-24 - Amended
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/08/24 10:41 AM

CORRECTIONS POLICY COMMITTEE

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Corrections Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting on May 8, 2024, at 10:00 a.m. in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Samantha Kossa at (971) 209-8235.

Effective Jan. 1, 2024, the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training will be live streaming all public meetings via YouTube. Meetings will no longer be streamed on Facebook. To view the Corrections Policy Committee's live-stream and other recorded videos, please visit DPSST’s official YouTube page at https://www.youtube.com/@DPSST.

Agenda Items:

1.   Introductions

2. Approve February 13, 2024 Meeting Minutes

3. Nicholas Alberts, DPSST No. 58569; Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office
    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

4. Mark Clark, DPSST No. 53303; DOC/Snake River Correctional Institution
    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

5. Joshua Gray, DPSST No. 60266; DOC/Columbia River Correctional Institution
    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

6. Brittany Kent, DPSST No. 58596; Washington County Community Corrections Center
    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

7. Brandon Martinez, DPSST No. 47202; DOC/Coffee Creek Correctional Facility
    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

8. Nicholas Mitchell, DPSST No. 58076; DOC/Santiam Correctional Institution
    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

9. Approval for Changes to the Basic Corrections Curriculum
    Presented by Julie Collinson

10. Proposed Rule Changes for Oregon Administrative Rule (OAR) 259-008-0085
      Codifying Board Approval of Changes to the Course Breakdown for the Basic Corrections Local Academy Curriculum
      Presented by Jennifer Howald

11. Agency Update

12. Next Corrections Policy Committee Meeting: August 13, 2024, at 10:00am

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Corrections Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


DPSST Applicant Review Committee Meeting 04-24-24
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/08/24 10:08 AM

APPLICANT REVIEW COMMITTEE

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Applicant Review Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 11:00 a.m. on April 24, 2024, at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. Please note the time for the Applicant Review Committee meetings has changed to 11:00am going forward. For further information, please contact Samantha Kossa at (971) 209-8235.

Effective Jan. 1, 2024, the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training will be live streaming all public meetings via YouTube. Meetings will no longer be streamed on Facebook. To view the Applicant Review Committee's live-stream and other recorded videos, please visit DPSST’s official YouTube page at https://www.youtube.com/@DPSST.

 

Agenda Items:

1. Introductions

2. Approve February 28, 2024 Meeting Minutes

3. Steven Atkins, DPSST No. 64789; DOC/Snake River Correctional Institution
    Presented by Cindy Park

4. Joshua Avila, DPSST No. 64730; Portland State University Campus Public Safety Office
    Presented by Cindy Park

5. Nicholas Fugate, DPSST No. 65029; Malheur County Sheriff’s Office
    Presented by Cindy Park

6. Inquiry Closure Memos – Information Only
    Presented by Cindy Park

7. Next Applicant Review Committee Meeting – May 22, 2024, at 11:00 a.m.

 

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Applicant Review Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Regional Forest Practice Committee for northwest Oregon meets April 15
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/08/24 9:16 AM

SALEM, Ore. – The Regional Forest Practice Committee for northwest Oregon will meet at 10 a.m. on Monday, April 15 in the Tillamook Room, Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Salem headquarters, 2600 State St., Salem, OR 97310. To join virtually, please use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda. To provide public comment, please email estresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov">forestresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov. 

The committee’s agenda includes:

  • ODF updates and member training requirements
  • Updates and informing post-disturbance harvest rulemaking
  • HCP update
  • FERNS update
  • Stream model update
  • Planning and priority for guidance development
  • Forest Practice Technical Guidance comment review

The public may attend in-person or online via Zoom. Public comments will be accepted. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 72 hours before the meeting by emailing estresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov">forestresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov.

Regional Forest Practices Committees are panels of citizens – mandated under Oregon law – that advise the Oregon Board of Forestry on current forestry issues and forest management approaches. In 1971, the legislature enacted Oregon’s Forest Practices Act which includes three Regional Forest Practices Committees, serving the Eastern, Northwest, and Southwest regions of the state. Under Oregon law, a majority of the committees’ members must be private forest landowners and logging or forest operations companies.

Oregon’s forests are among the state’s most valued resources, providing a balanced mix of environmental, economic, and social benefitsView more information on the RFPC webpage.


Sun. 04/07/24
Winning $1.326 Billion Powerball Jackpot Sold in Oregon (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 04/07/24 11:09 AM
A Powerball ticket worth $1.326 billion was sold in Portland.
A Powerball ticket worth $1.326 billion was sold in Portland.
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Salem, Ore. – A Powerball ticket worth $1.326 billion was sold in Portland and is the fourth largest Powerball jackpot in the game’s history. The ticket for Saturday’s drawing was purchased on April 6. 

“I want to congratulate the winner on this life changing moment. No one in Oregon has ever won a prize on this scale, and it’s very exciting for our staff and players,” said Oregon Lottery Director Mike Wells. “Even if you aren’t holding the winning ticket, all of our players support programs and services statewide that receive Lottery dollars.”

The winner has a year to come forward and claim their prize. Per state law, players in Oregon, with few exceptions, cannot remain anonymous. The largest Powerball prize previously won in Oregon was a $340 million jackpot in 2005. The last time a Powerball jackpot was won in the state was in 2018, when a Salem man won $150.4 million. 

Approximately a third of sales from the game will be returned to state beneficiaries to support economic development, education, veteran services, state parks and more. 

Retailers who sell lottery tickets also earn commissions from the boost in ticket sales and bonus payments for lower tier wins. For instance, an Oregon retailer who sells a $1 million ticket would earn a $10,000 bonus. 

Saturday’s jackpot was the eighth largest among U.S. lottery jackpot games. The jackpot was previously won on New Year’s Day in Michigan with a ticket that won a $842.4 million jackpot. Powerball is a multi-state jackpot operated by 44 states, plus the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. 

The Oregon Lottery recommends that you always sign the back of your ticket to ensure you can claim your prize. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. 

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $15.5 billion for economic development, public education, outdoor school, state parks, veteran services, and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org




Attached Media Files: A Powerball ticket worth $1.326 billion was sold in Portland.

Fri. 04/05/24
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Requesting Assistance Locating Missing Overdue Redmond Female (Photo)
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office - 04/05/24 8:16 PM
missing
missing
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UPDATE

Released by: Lieutenant Jayson Janes

Date: April 5, 2024

Kelly Estella O'Brien has been located and reunited with her family. 

End of Update

 

Released By: Sergeant Jason Wall

Release Date: April 5, 2024

Missing/Overdue Subject: Kelly Estella O’Brien, 58-year-old female, Redmond, Oregon

Vehicle: 2014 Toyota Rav 4, Oregon license plate 969 KXT

Narrative:

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is requesting assistance from the public regarding a missing/overdue female from the Redmond, Oregon area.

Kelly Estella O’Brien was last seen at the Super 8 Motel in Redmond on April 4th, 2024, at approximately 3:40 pm. O’Brien was last seen wearing a green jacket and tan ball cap. O’Brien is believed to driving her 2014 Toyota Rav 4 SUV, bearing Oregon license plate 969 KXT.

If anyone witnesses O’Brien or her vehicle, please contact Deschutes County 911 non-emergency at 541-693-6911, reference case number 24-18045.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full-service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 259 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 193 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County. 




Attached Media Files: missing , missing