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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Fri. Jul. 12 - 7:43 pm
Fri. 07/12/24
Redmond area pursuit ends in arrest and recovery of stolen vehicle.
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office - 07/12/24 7:33 PM

Release by:  Sergeant Aaron Harding

Release Date: 07/12/2024

Location:  Northeast of McGrath Rd and Stenkamp Rd Intersection

Arrested:  Hart, Joshua Lee, 35 year-old male, Redmond, OR

Vehicle: Black, 2001 Ford F350 (Stolen vehicle)

Charges:

1 Count of Fleeing or Attempting to Elude Police Officer

1 Count of Unauthorized Use of a Vehicle

1 Count of Criminal Driving while Suspended or Revoked (Misdemeanor)

1 Count – In-State Warrant

On July 12, 2024 at approximately 2:42 PM, a Deschutes County Sheriff’s Deputy attempted a traffic stop on a black, Ford F350 on Hwy 97 southbound near Veterans Way in Redmond, OR for a traffic violation.  The driver failed to yield in an attempt to elude the deputy who initiated a brief pursuit.  The pursuit was quickly discontinued after the deputy was able to safely deploy Star Chase. Star Chase is a pursuit management system that allows a trained deputy to remotely affix a GPS tracking device/tag to a vehicle at which point the vehicle’s location can be tracked by law enforcement.  The vehicle was monitored as it drove southeast off-road until it was abandoned on BLM land east of Chaparrel Dr. and McGrath Rd.  After a successful track by deputies and a Bend Police K-9, Joshua Hart was taken into custody without harm for the above-mentioned crimes.  During the incident, a Deschutes Alert notification was sent out to the nearby neighborhoods of Terry Dr., Chaparrel Dr., and Cimarron Dr. advising residents of police activity in the area.  The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the Bend Police Department, Oregon State Police, Redmond Police Department, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, and the US Forest Service for their assistance on the incident.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full-service agency that oversees the Deschutes County Adult Jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil-process, and search and rescue operations.  Special units include the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office SWAT Team, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with five K-9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 259 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 193 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

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Missing child alert -- Marianna Bahena is missing and believed to be at risk (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 07/12/24 4:38 PM
2024-07/973/173771/Gabrieal_Mendez.jpg
2024-07/973/173771/Gabrieal_Mendez.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/973/173771/thumb_Gabrieal_Mendez.jpg

(Salem) – Marianna Bahena, age 2, went missing with her mother Gabrieal Mendez from Portland on July 11. Marianna is known to the State of Washington and the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division. Marianna is believed to be in danger and has an injury that is in need of urgent medical care. ODHS is searching for Marianna to assess her safety.

ODHS asks the public to help in the effort to find Marianna. Anyone who suspects they have information about the location of Marianna or Gabrieal Mendez should call 911. 

They are believed to be in Portland, Oregon, Vancouver, Washington or Battle Ground, Washington. 

Name: Marianna Bahena
Pronouns: She/her
Date of birth: Aug. 25, 2021
Height: 40 inches
Weight: 29 pounds
Hair: Brown
Eye color: Brown
Other identifying information: Marianna is with her mother Gabrieal Mendez. It is likely that they are also with Gabrieal Mendez’s 6-year-old son. 

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Attached Media Files: 2024-07/973/173771/Gabrieal_Mendez.jpg , 2024-07/973/173771/Marianna_Bahena_2.jpg , 2024-07/973/173771/Marianna_Bahena.png

Bend man arrested for stalking and harassment
Bend Police Dept. - 07/12/24 4:02 PM

Date: July 12, 2024

Case #s: 2024-00002334, 2024-00015443, 2024-00038567, 2024-00037075

Incident: Bend man arrested for stalking and harassment

Arrested: Nathan Shaun Sprague, 37-year-old Bend resident

Offenses: Telephonic Harassment x5, Stalking II x2, Coercion x2, Initiating a False Report x2, Menacing, Disorderly Conduct I, out-of-county warrant

Bend Police this week arrested a Bend man suspected of harassing and stalking multiple women throughout Central Oregon and beyond. 

In January, 37-year-old Bend resident Nathan Sprague called police to report fraudulent use of his credit card to purchase a trash can and have it shipped to a home in Vancouver, Wash. Around the same time, a Vancouver woman called to report Sprague had offered to buy her the trash can, then threatened to report the purchase as fraud. He then sent a series of threatening messages to the woman and threatened to come to her home to do her harm. 

In March, Sprague called the county’s Stabilization Center and threatened to commit a shooting at a local grocery store. 

This month, a woman reported Sprague had called dozens of times and sent hundreds of unwanted text messages and messages on social media over the course of four days. Days later, another woman reported she met Sprague online and after learning of his previous stalking charges, blocked him on the app through which they’d been communicating. Sprague then used a payment app to repeatedly message the woman, threatening her harm. 

At approximately 4:55 p.m. on Tuesday, July 9, Bend Police took Sprague into custody in the parking lot of Safeway West, in the 300 block of SW Century Drive. He was lodged at the Deschutes County Jail on five counts of telephonic harassment, two counts of second-degree stalking, two counts of coercion, two counts of initiating a false report, menacing, first-degree disorderly conduct, and an out-of-county warrant. 

It is possible Sprague has additional victims. If you or someone you know has been the target of Sprague’s harassment, you are asked to contact nonemergency dispatch at 541-693-6911. 


Oklahoma Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Sexually Exploiting a Child
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/12/24 3:30 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—An Oklahoma City man was sentenced to federal prison Wednesday for sexually abusing a child and capturing the abuse on video.

Jeremy Lee Peterson, 44, was sentenced to the statutory maximum sentence of 360 months in federal prison and a life term of supervised release. 

According to court documents, on February 18, 2022, Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) agents received information from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) regarding a video depicting child sexual abuse. Agents reviewed the video’s file data and suspected it was created in a specific apartment in Eugene, Oregon. The agents identified distinctive physical characteristics of the abuser in the video, including a scorpion tattoo on the man’s chest.

On February 24, 2022, investigators searched the apartment and identified furniture and bed sheets consistent with those appearing in the abuse video. Investigators also found photos of Peterson on social media and obtained a booking photo from a previous arrest, both of which matched the likeness and physical attributes, including the scorpion tattoo, as depicted in the abuse video. During their investigation, agents learned the minor victim and the victim’s parent had recently moved to a residence in Oklahoma that matched Peterson’s most recent address. 

On February 28, 2022, agents in Oklahoma executed a search warrant on Peterson’s address and found the minor victim and parent living there. Peterson was arrested and the child was rescued. Soon after, agents learned that Peterson had recently helped the victim and the victim’s parent move to his residence in Oklahoma.

On March 15, 2022, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a one-count indictment charging Peterson with sexually exploiting a child and producing child pornography. 

Months after Peterson was charged, his minor victim contacted law enforcement to discuss the abuse in Oregon and disclose additional abuse in Oklahoma.

On March 27, 2024, Peterson pleaded guilty to sexually exploiting a child.

This case was investigated by HSI in the District of Oregon and the Western District of Oklahoma, with assistance from the Eugene Police Department. It was prosecuted by William M. McLaren, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

Anyone who has information about the physical or online exploitation of children are encouraged to contact HSI at (866) 347-2423 or submit a tip online at report.cybertip.org.

Federal law defines child pornography as any visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct involving a minor. It is important to remember child sexual abuse material depicts actual crimes being committed against children. Not only do these images and videos document the victims’ exploitation and abuse, but when shared across the internet, re-victimize and re-traumatize the child victims each time their abuse is viewed. To learn more, please visit the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at www.missingkids.org.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

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Attached Media Files: Sentencing_Peterson

Public hearings scheduled for wildfire prevention and certified burn manager proposed rules
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/12/24 1:09 PM

SALEM, Ore. — Public hearings are scheduled July 30 to gather feedback on administrative rules packages expanding and updating wildfire prevention restrictions, the Certified Burn Manager Program, and establishing the Prescribed Fire Liability Pilot Program.

Public hearings scheduled for wildfire prevention and certified burn manager proposed rules

SALEM, Ore. — Public hearings are scheduled July 30 to gather feedback on administrative rules packages expanding and updating wildfire prevention restrictions, the Certified Burn Manager Program, and establishing the Prescribed Fire Liability Pilot Program.

The Board of Forestry approved the public hearing process for the proposed rule packages during their June 5 meeting: 

  • 629-025-0040 to 629-025-0050
  • 629-042-1005 to 629-042-1065
  • 629-042-2000 to 629-042-2060
  • 629-043-0020 to 629-043-0030
  • 629-047-0010 to 629-047-0100

See the agency’s rules website to access notices of proposed rulemaking for draft rule language. The department consulted a Rulemaking Advisory Committee representing a wide variety of stakeholder interests while drafting the proposed rules. 

The prevention rules align fire prevention, equipment requirements for fire suppression and use of fireworks on public lands to increase wildfire prevention efforts. Certified Burn Manager proposed rules intend to advance the maturity of the Certified Burn Manager Program. Proposed rules also establish the Prescribed Fire Liability Pilot Program described in Senate Bill 80 (2023) and HB 4016 (2024).

Comment can be made at the virtual public meeting below:

Comments can also be sent to yan.miller@odf.oregon.gov">ryan.miller@odf.oregon.gov until 5 p.m. on Aug. 15. Please clarify which rule your comments pertain to in your email.


Training for the future law enforcement is in the hands of the ladies! (Photo)
Redmond Police Dept. - 07/12/24 10:44 AM
Mock trial
Mock trial
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/6157/173739/thumb_5.jpg

Redmond, OR - On July 10, 2024, the Central Oregon Women in Law Enforcement (COWIL) hosted their first ever Jr. Women’s Law Enforcement Academy designed for teens 13-18 years of age.  This one-day camp, the first of its kind in Central Oregon, was put on by all women in a variety of law enforcement roles from the Central Oregon area and across the state.  Activities included a physical agility test, a mock trial, traffic stops, dispatching, handcuffing, crime scene processing, Fish and Wildlife, drone operations, CERT/SWAT, K9, Parole and Probation, and more! 

“As a law enforcement professional, it is important to share the career opportunities within the field for young women as well as take the time to mentor future law enforcement generations,” state Redmond Police Department Lt. April Huey.  “These camps are an interactive way to start that process.”  

Thank you to the following agencies for their support and participation:  Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Redmond Police Department, Bend Police Department, Sunriver Police Department, Prineville Police Department, Oregon State Police, Crook County and Deschutes County Parole and Probation, Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office, Deschutes County 9-1-1, Central Oregon Chaplaincy, COLES, CERT, and Redmond Fire & Rescue.  Also, thank you to Highland Baptist Church for allowing the agencies to use their facility for this fun and educational community event. 

See attached camp images courtesy Redmond Police Department




Attached Media Files: Mock trial , CERT , ORPAT , Traffic Stops , Handcuffing , Intro to CERT , Camp photo

Public hearings scheduled for statewide wildfire hazard map rules
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/12/24 10:14 AM

SALEM, Ore. — Public hearings are scheduled July 31 and Aug. 1 to gather feedback on a rules package establishing the contested case appeals process, designating properties in wildfire hazard zones, and identifying the wildland-urban interface, as required by Senate Bill 762 (2021) and Senate Bill 80 (2023). 

The Board of Forestry approved the public hearing process for the proposed rule package, Oregon Administrative Rules 629-001-0001 to 0057 and 629-044-1000 to 1041, during their June 5 meeting. See the notice of proposed rulemaking for draft rule language. The department consulted a Rulemaking Advisory Committee representing a wide variety of stakeholder interests while drafting the proposed rules. 

The rules will be used by Oregon State University to address irrigated agriculture as a mitigating factor to assessing wildfire hazard in the statewide wildfire hazard map, which includes assigning one of three hazard zones to individual properties. The rules also establish the process to appeal assignment of a hazard zone or classification.

Comment can be made at any of the virtual public meetings below:

Comments can also be sent to ules@odf.oregon.gov">maprules@odf.oregon.gov until 5 p.m. on Aug. 15. Please clarify which rule your comments pertain to in your email.


Cow Valley Fire in Malheur County declared a conflagration, OSFM sending additional resources
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/12/24 10:12 AM

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon State Fire Marshal is mobilizing several task forces and its Red Incident Management Team to the Cow Valley Fire in Malheur County to protect people and property. Overnight Thursday, the agency sent two task forces from Umatilla and Multnomah counties through Immediate Response. These task forces will be joined by two others from Lane and Marion counties.  

“The weather conditions we are seeing across Oregon are extremely concerning. The forecast over the weekend for much of Eastern Oregon will not be doing us any favors,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “The state has seen numerous human-caused wildfires over the last few weeks, and I am asking everyone to be careful and aware of the extreme fire conditions, especially with lightning in the forecast.” 

According to the Vale Bureau of Land Management District, the fire is being pushed by gusty winds, triple-digit temperatures, and low humidity, causing substantial fire growth in the last 12 hours. An infrared flight is happening this morning to get an accurate size of the fire. That information will be shared once it is available. Weather for this fire is expected to be challenging over the next few days with a Fire Weather Watch in place by the National Weather Service for abundant lightning and wind this weekend.  

The OSFM’s Red Incident Management Team will be in unified command with Northwest Team 6, a federal complex incident management team.  

Malheur County Emergency Management and the Red Cross have a shelter in Girvin Hall at the Malheur County Fairgrounds. Those who have questions about the shelter should call 208-519-6675. 

Evacuation notices will be issued by the Malheur County Sheriff’s Office. A Facebook page is set up to share fire information. 

On Friday morning, Oregon Governor Tina Kotek invoked the Emergency Conflagration Act for the fire which allows the state fire marshal to mobilize state resources to protect life and property. 

Following ORS 476.510-476.610, Governor Kotek determined that threats to life, safety, and property exist because of the fire, and the threats exceed the capabilities of local firefighting personnel and equipment.  


INSIGHT SCHOOL OF OREGON - PAINTED HILLS | REGULAR BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING | August 15, 2024 @11:30am
Insight School of Ore. - Painted Hills - 07/12/24 8:45 AM

The ISOR-PH regular board meeting is scheduled for August 15, 2024 @11:30am.

Insight School of Oregon Painted Hills Board Members are hereby notified that the regular Meeting of the Board will be held August 15, 2024 @11:30am. 

 

The next regular scheduled meeting will take place on August 15 @11:30am

Insight School of Oregon Painted Hills Board Members are hereby notified that the Meeting of the Board will be held at:

1.Via Teleconference - using any of the following US phone numbers

+1 253 215 8782

+1 346 248 7799

+1 669 900 9128

+1 301 715 8592

+1 312 626 6799

+1 646 558 8656

Meeting ID is: 936 9648 8538

And

2. Via Zoom Meeting Link:

https://zoom.us/s/93696488538

The Public has been invited to the Board Meeting with notices posted at the following locations:

A. FlashNet Newswire

http://flashalertbend.net/press-releases.html

B. Insight School of Oregon Painted Hills Office

603 NW 3rd Street

Prineville, OR 97754


Thu. 07/11/24
Oregon State Fire Marshal sends two task forces to Cow Valley Fire (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/11/24 9:20 PM
Courtesy: Oregon Dept. of Transportation
Courtesy: Oregon Dept. of Transportation
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1062/173744/thumb_ODOT_COW_VALLEY.jpg

SALEM, Ore. – A fast-moving wildfire Thursday evening in Malheur County prompted the Oregon State Fire Marshal to mobilize two structural task forces to the Cow Valley Fire burning near the town of Brogan. The task forces from Umatilla and Multnomah counties are being sent through Immediate Response, a tool the state fire marshal uses to mobilize task forces outside of a conflagration. 

“The east side of the state has faced challenging fire conditions over the last week. The Cow Valley Fire is being pushed by gusty winds and low humidity,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “We are using an essential tool and the power of the Oregon Fire Mutual Aid System to provide added resources to the Cow Valley Fire. Firefighters funded through the 2024 Wildfire Season Staffing Grant allowed a quicker response for the local agencies.”

The fire is rapidly changing and estimated to be about 16,000 acres according to the Vale Bureau of Land Management District and threatening 30 to 50 homes. 

According to the Malheur County Sheriff’s Office, the Cow Valley Fire changed direction early Thursday evening and headed east toward the town quickly. The sheriff’s office is advising those in Brogan and the surrounding areas to be prepared to leave their home if an evacuation order is made. Follow the Malheur County Sheriff’s Office for information about evacuations. 

The Oregon Department of Transportation closed a stretch of Highway 26 in the area of the fire. The agency says the highway is expected to remain closed through the night. 

The Umatilla County task force is made up of local fire agencies from Umatilla, Baker, Gilliam, Morrow, and Union counties. 

The task force from Multnomah County was previously assigned to the Larch Creek Fire. The Oregon State Fire Marshal will continue to monitor the fire and is ready to provide more support if needed.

About Immediate Response
Immediate Response is made possible through the OSFM’s Response Ready Oregon program created through Oregon’s wildfire omnibus bill, Senate Bill 762, signed into law in 2021.




Attached Media Files: Courtesy: Oregon Dept. of Transportation

Missing child alert -- Anna Gabriella Villarreal is missing and is believed to be in danger (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 07/11/24 3:24 PM
2024-07/973/173729/Anna_Gabriella_Villarreal.jpg
2024-07/973/173729/Anna_Gabriella_Villarreal.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/973/173729/thumb_Anna_Gabriella_Villarreal.jpg

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find Anna Gabriella Villarreal, age 15, a child in foster care who went missing from Ontario on June 30. Anna is believed to be in danger.

ODHS asks the public for help in the effort to find Anna and to contact 911 or local law enforcement if they believe they see her.

Anna is suspected to be in Ontario or San Diego, California. 

Name: Anna Gabriella Villarreal
Pronouns: She/her
Date of birth: Nov. 19, 2008
Height: 5-foot-5
Weight: 126 pounds
Hair: Brown with a reddish tint
Eye color: Brown eyes
Other identifying information: Anna has a pierced left eyebrow and nose. She has small tattoos on her hands and ankles. 
Ontario Police Department Case #24P05094
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #2025440

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Attached Media Files: 2024-07/973/173729/Anna_Gabriella_Villarreal.jpg , 2024-07/973/173729/Anna_Gabriella_Villarreal_2.png

Cow Valley fire moving toward U.S. 26 between Ironside and Brogan (Photo)
ODOT: East. Ore. - 07/11/24 2:08 PM
Fire near U.S. 26 on July 11, 2024.
Fire near U.S. 26 on July 11, 2024.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1204/173723/thumb_Fire_near_U.S._26-2_071124.jpg

The Cow Valley Fire is currently moving south toward U.S. 26 and is expected to affect the highway between milepost 239 and milepost 247 within the next few hours. If necessary, we will close U.S. 26 between Ironside (milepost 231) and Brogan (milepost 254). Please drive with caution and check TripCheck for the latest road status updates.




Attached Media Files: Fire near U.S. 26 on July 11, 2024.

Student loan ombuds focusing on helping borrowers navigate shifting rules, changes in repayment laws (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 07/11/24 12:38 PM
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Salem – Student loan borrowers faced significant confusion and frustration this past year in navigating the shifting landscape of loan repayment and forgiveness programs, according to a new report issued by Oregon’s student loan ombuds. Part of the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation, the student loan ombuds is tasked with helping guide borrowers through their options and navigate the confusing road that has become the world of student loans.

As part of the position, the legislature requires an annual report that highlights the work of the student loan ombuds. Lane Thompson, who has been in the position for more than two years, recently posted the second annual report.

Thompson said the past year has been challenging.

“After federal student loan payments were paused during the pandemic, the return to repayment last September was really messy,” she said. “There has been a lot of confusion, because the courts struck down some of the (Biden) administration’s attempts at a loan forgiveness program, complicating federal agencies ability to produce consistent messaging leading up to repayment.”

She said because the rules continue to change, it leads to frustration and confusion for both borrowers and servicers. 

“The good news is that student loan cancellation is more available than ever and people are getting resolution through the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program and the one-time account adjustment,” Thompson said. “This is especially true for those who have been making payments for a long time.”

Going into year three, Thompson said she is excited that her work will be able to help more people get clarity on their options and eligibility for student loan repayment programs.

“I think that’s the biggest impact I’m having on a day-to-day basis is that people can get help or answers from me,” she said. “We have more resources available and I am out doing more presentations to different organizations.”

The other area Thompson said where her office is having an impact is in helping student loan borrowers avoid scams.

“We are doing more outreach to help Oregonians protect themselves,” she said. “Fewer people are getting scammed and I think that’s because we have the licensing requirements, examinations taking place, and our advocates helping people navigate through difficult situations.”

Thompson said during this past year, she has sent information to borrowers in a much clearer way whether through more experience, online resources, brochures, and relationship building.

“They see me and know that there is a real person here to help them and that really helps,” she said.

Thompson said more relief could be coming.

“I was on a federal rulemaking committee  that worked on specific debt forgiveness rules under the higher education act, and there is some debt relief coming out for people who really need it in the near future,” she said. “There will continue to be changes to the rules and I feel confident that our office will continue to be a good resource as circumstances continue to shift.”

If you have questions about your student loans or issues with your loan providers, contact Thompson at 888-877-4894 (toll-free) or .bankingproducthelp@dcbs.oregon.gov">Dfr.bankingproducthelp@dcbs.oregon.gov

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About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation protects consumers and regulates insurance, depository institutions, trust companies, securities, and consumer financial products and services. The division is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest consumer protection and business regulatory agency. Visit dfr.oregon.gov and dcbs.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/1073/173719/DFR-logo-blue.jpg

Annual Ombudsman report urges greater priority on providing culturally responsive health services and eliminating closed behavioral health networks 
Oregon Health Authority - 07/11/24 12:32 PM

July 11, 2024  

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459, timothy.heider@oha.oregon.gov 

Annual Ombudsman report urges greater priority on providing culturally responsive health services and eliminating closed behavioral health networks  

SALEM, Ore. –Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has realized gains in providing access to culturally responsive health services, according to a 2023 year-end report issued by OHA’s Ombuds program.  

But the report also urges OHA to take more steps to further broaden access to these programs and to expand the Ombuds program’s capacity to more effectively respond “to the complexity of current multi-system casework that reflect statewide gaps in mental health and substance abuse care” for Oregon Health Plan (OHP) members.  

“OHA must work collaboratively with coordinated care organizations (CCOs) while also acting on equity-centered Oregon Health Plan member policy solutions for our statewide behavioral health crisis,” said Sarah Dobra, OHA Ombuds program manager. 

"OHA must ensure in the next CCO’s procurement that CCOs contract with all willing and licensed behavioral health providers,” she added.   

The report is based on Ombuds Program data, member stories and experiences, along with other statewide data.   

The 2023 report “presents no new concerns” but continues to elevate concerns from previous years. (Annual reports since 2020 can be found on the OHA website.)

The report called for more efforts in two categories:

  • Providing language access and culturally responsive services, and

Eliminating closed behavior health networks.  

Language access and culturally responsive services

While the report lists successes over the past four years to increase accessibility to culturally responsive care, it also raised numerous concerns about existing challenges.  

OHP members who prefer a language other than English, or seek culturally responsive care, still experience service gaps, and are often overwhelmed by the complexities of the system, which sometimes results in poorer quality of care.  

The report recommends adding enhanced payments to physical and dental services providers who provide culturally responsive services. This is already done within behavioral health.  

Eliminate closed behavioral health networks

The complexities of the system take a toll on Ombuds program resources. Over the four years, the program’s casework, and advocacy for OHP participants experiencing substance use disorders or mental health concerns increased by 87 percent.  

This requires improved coordination and a need for shared solutions between OHA’s Medicaid and Behavioral Health Divisions, according to the report.  

Other concerns include:

  • Insufficient statewide capacity for residential substance use disorder services, resulting in OHP members struggling to find those services in their CCO networks.
  • Member access is further limited by CCO provider networks that either lack availability by specialty or may not work with all inpatient facilities willing to accept OHP members.
  • Lack of real-time updates to OHP provider directories, resulting in “ghost networks” that presume there is provider availability, when there is not.
  • Inadequate access to substance use provider networks. On average, CCOs, contract with only nine of Oregon’s 47 licensed facilities, meaning that a CCO member’s ability to gain timely access to treatment is dependent on which CCO they are in.
  • Limited CCO mental health networks for mental health clinicians which leads to OHP members being unable to access mental health providers contracted with their CCO.

The Ombuds program supports Oregon’s efforts to advance better health, lower costs, and better care for everyone in Oregon.   

OHP members encountering barriers or challenges to accessible care are encouraged to work directly with their CCO to resolve their concerns. All members have the right to ask for a care coordinator.   

CCOs and Care Coordinators are often best equipped to support and resolve OHP member access to care and quality of care concerns in a timely manner.    

OHP members who have not received the support they need from OHA or from a CCO can contact the Ombuds program for support udsOffice@odhsoha.oregon.gov">by email or by phone (1-877-642-0450).   

Contact information and a phone message line are available in 14 languages and can be found on the OHA Ombuds program website.  

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McCaffery Road Fire (Photo)
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office - 07/11/24 12:02 PM
2024-07/5227/173555/Media_Release_Image.jpg
2024-07/5227/173555/Media_Release_Image.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/5227/173555/thumb_Media_Release_Image.jpg

MCCAFFERY FIRE UPDATE

Release By: Sergeant Jason Wall

Release Date: July 11, 2024

Update July 11, 2024 12:00 PM

After consultation with fire managers the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office and Crook County Sheriff’s Office are lifting all evacuation notices around the McCaffery Fire effective at 5:00pm today.

Updated maps and information can be found at deschutes.org/emergency

Please continue to be engaged and vigilant of what is happening in your surrounding areas.

Please refer to the Prineville District of the Bureau of Land Management for information regarding road and area closures.

END OF UPDATE

 

Released by: Sergeant Nathan Garibay

Date: July 9, 2024

Location: McCaffery Fire

UPDATE July 9, 2024 08:30 AM

Due to continued progress on the McCaffery Fire, both Deschutes County Sheriff's Office and Crook County Sheriff's Office are reducing evacuation levels from Level 2: Be Set to Level 1: Be Ready for the following areas:

Level 2: Bet Set has been reduced to Level 1: Be Ready for the areas on Sunny Sage Rd. off of McCaffery Rd. in Deschutes County 

Level 2: Bet Set has been reduced to Level 1: Be Ready for the area of west Powell Butte Estates and the area to the south to Powell Butte Hwy. in Crook County.

Level 1: Be Ready means you should be ready to evacuate if conditions worsen. Stay informed and monitor local media, official news and social media sites, and prepare your vehicle and family for evacuation.

Current evacuation maps can be found at www.deschutes.org/emergency.

Residents and landowners on Sunny Sage and SE McCaffery Rd in Deschutes County will only be able to access their property via Sherman Rd from Hwy 126 (just past the Redmond Airport). Residents and landowners please only travel on Sherman Rd to McCaffery to Sunny Sage. 

Please do not travel on any roads other than Sherman Rd, McCaffery, and Sunny Sage. McCaffery Rd is closed east of Sunny Sage.

 

Released by: Sergeant Nathan Garibay

Date: July 6, 2024

Location: McCaffery Fire

UPDATE July 7, 2024 6:00 PM

The Level 3: Go Now evacuation notices for SE McCaffery Rd and SE Sunny Sage Way in Deschutes County will be lowered to Level 2: Be Set effective 6 PM tonight.

Current evacuation notices are:

Level 2: Be Set

West Powell Butte Estates and the area south towards Powell Butte Hwy in Crook County.

The private land off of SE Sunny Sage Way and SE McCaffery Rd in Deschutes County.

Level 2: Means “BE SET” to evacuate. You must prepare to leave at a moment’s notice. This level indicates there is significant danger to your area, and residents should either voluntary relocate to a shelter or with family and friends outside of the affected area, or if choosing to remain, to be ready to evacuate at a moment’s notice. Residents MAY have time to gather necessary items, but doing so is at their own risk. This may be the only notice you receive. Emergency services cannot guarantee that they will be able to notify you if conditions rapidly deteriorate. Area media services will be asked to broadcast periodic updates.

Road Closures:

Calvary Way between Hwy 126 and McCafferty Rd in Crook County.

Sherman Rd and SE McCaffery Rd in Deschutes County.

Access for returning residents:

Residents and landowners on Sunny Sage Way and SE McCaffery Rd in Deschutes County will only be able to access their property via Sherman Rd from Hwy 126 (just past the Redmond Airport).  Security will be on site to ensure only residents and landowners will be allowed into the area as surrounding lands managed by the Prineville District of the Bureau of Land Management are closed. Residents and landowners please only travel on Sherman Rd to McCaffery to Sunny Sage Way. 

For information on evacuation maps and road closures, go to www.deschutes.org/emergency.

 

UPDATE July 6, 2024 10:00 PM

Level 3: Go Now will remain in efect for the areas on Sunny Sage Rd. off of McCaffery Rd. in Deschutes County 

Level 3 has been reduced to Level 2: Be Set for the area of west Powell Butte Estates and the area to the south to Powell Butte Hwy. in Crook County.

Level 2 means Be Set: 

Be ready to evacuate at a moment’s notice. Find resources at www.deschutes.org/emergency. Monitor local social media, TV, radio, and telephone devices. Act early if there is any reason you might need extra time. Leave right away if you feel you are in immediate danger. 

If conditions change quickly, this may be the only alert you receive. 

 

Released by: Rachelle Brookins, Emergency Services Coordinator

Date: July 6, 2024 at 5:07pm

Due to fire activity in the area of McCaffery and Sherman Rd. the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office and Crook County Sheriff's Office has issued the following evacuation notices.

Level 3 (Go Now!) Evacuation notice is issued for the following areas: 

All residences on Sunny Sage Rd. off of McCaffery Rd. in Deschutes County.

West Powell Butte Estates and the area to the south to Powell Butte Hwy. 

Level 3: means “GO” evacuate now. Leave immediately! Danger to your area is current or imminent, and you should evacuate immediately. If you choose to ignore this advisement, you must understand that emergency services may not be available to assist you further. DO NOT delay leaving to gather any belongings or make efforts to protect your home. This will be the last notice you receive.

A Temporary Evacuation Point is being established at the Powell Butte Church. 

Large animals can be sheltered at the Crook County Fairgrounds.

Current maps including evacuation areas can be found at:

https://deschutes.org/emergency

For fire information, you can visit the Central Oregon Fire information site at:

www.centraloregonfire.org

Make sure you are registered for Deschutes Alerts to receive evacuation and emergency alert and warnings in your area by going to:

www.deschutesalerts.org

 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full-service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with five K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 259 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 193 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/5227/173555/Media_Release_Image.jpg

Western Oregon University receives grant from Spirit Mountain Community Fund to support community needs
Western Oregon University - 07/11/24 11:41 AM

MONMOUTH, Ore. –Western Oregon University’s Center for Equity and Gender Justice–called Abby’s House–received a $50,000 grant from Spirit Mountain Community Fund to help support individuals experiencing food insecurity, survivors of domestic abuse, and sexual assault.

As the only resource center of its kind in Monmouth, Abby’s House services are paramount to making a positive impact on the lives of those who experience food insecurity and domestic violence. Director of Abby’s House Kristen Perry shares, "Since September 2022, Abby’s House has provided 51,321 pounds of food and 5,780 clothing items and demand for their services has grown exponentially. This grant will ensure that individuals requiring basic needs and survivorship resources continue to receive robust wraparound support and care.”

“The strength of our local partnerships is something we take pride in,” said Spirit Mountain Community Fund Executive Director Angie Sears. “We’re thankful for the opportunity to collaborate with Western Oregon University Foundation and Abby’s House to provide support for wraparound services available to the WOU campus & local community populations in the form of basic needs, survivor support, and prevention & education.”  

The mission of Abby’s House is to provide the campus and greater community with educational opportunities, resources, and referral services designed to promote equity and non-violence. Basic needs support for the Western campus and the broader Monmouth-area community is also a primary focus of Abby’s House, which houses the Stitch Closet and Monmouth's only food pantry. Abby’s House embraces a feminist model that empowers all people to actively stand against all forms of violence and oppression while providing safety, support, and space for healing to individuals who experience disruptions to their well-being.

 

https://wou.edu/2024/07/11/western-oregon-university-receives-grant-from-spirit-mountain-community-fund-to-support-community-needs/

###

 

About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, established in Monmouth in 1856, proudly stands as Oregon’s oldest public university. Hosting around 4,000 students, Western embodies a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution, with approximately 80% of its students hailing from within the state. Notably, its diverse student body comprises individuals from underrepresented backgrounds, veterans, and non-traditional learners. Western stands as the preferred campus in Oregon for those pursuing an enriching education within a nurturing, student-focused environment, characterized by faculty-led instruction. Where You Belong.


 


Public Safety Memorial Fund Board Meeting
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/11/24 11:12 AM

PUBLIC SAFETY MEMORIAL FUND BOARD

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Public Safety Memorial Fund Board will hold a regular meeting on July 25, 2024, directly following the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training meeting that begins at 9:00 am. at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE Salem. For further information, please contact Juan Lopez at (503) 551-3167.

 

Agenda Items

1. Introductions

2. Approve June 10, 2024, and June 17, 2024, Meeting Minutes

3. Budget Update

   Presented by Shelby Wright

4. John Christopher Kilcullen (DPSST #35147); Eugene Police Department; Supplemental Application for Discretionary PSMF Benefits

    Presented by Shelby Wright

5. Public Safety Memorial Fund Board Oregon Administrative Rule (OAR) Change Update 

    Presented by Jennifer Howald

6. Next meeting – October 24, 2024, directly following the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training meeting at 9:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded.


Better weather helps progress on Larch Creek Fire, ODF Incident Management Team 2 will transition into unified command with OSFM Green Team
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/11/24 10:48 AM

Dufur, Ore. – Throughout the evening winds subsided and the Larch Creek Fire growth slowed. Dozers working through the night made good progress putting in control line and engines patrolled near homes in the fire area.  

Today structure task forces will continue to mop up and secure around homes in the fire area. Firefighters will be putting in hose lays and working with engines and water tenders to strengthen control lines. Dozers and crews will work on establishing line around the fire footprint on the east side of Highway 197. Air resources continue to be available and will engage as needed throughout the day.  

The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Incident Management Team 2 will shadow the Central Oregon IMT today. This evening at 6 p.m. ODF Team 2 and OSFM Green Team will officially transition into unified command. A huge Thank You to the Central Oregon Type 3 Interagency IMT for their coordination and efforts on this quickly emerging incident. 

The weather will moderate today with temperatures in the low 90’s with afternoon winds that should moderate into the evening. The next few days should see temperatures continuing to decrease and less substantial winds in the fire area, a very welcome forecast for firefighters. Yesterday there was one firefighter with heat related injuries who was transported to a local hospital. 

Stay informed on updated evacuation alerts here: 

https://www.facebook.com/WascoCountySheriff?ref=embed_page

A Red Cross shelter is open at Maupin High School for all community members effected by the current evacuations.

 Sherman County Fairgrounds is open for evacuation of livestock and pets. Hood River Fairgrounds is also open to displaced animals. Hwy 197 is being closely monitored and may be closed or have traffic control, check Trip Check for updates. Road & Weather Conditions Map | TripCheck - Oregon Traveler Information

Be aware of the extreme fire danger we are currently experiencing! Know Before You Go and check for Fire Restrictions in your area. 


Redmond Officers Force Entry to Burning Home, Alerting Residents to Imminent Danger.
Redmond Police Dept. - 07/11/24 10:36 AM

 

Redmond, OR - On Friday, July 5, at approximately 1:22 a.m., Redmond Police along with Redmond Fire and Rescue responded to a reported structure fire at 2175 NW Redwood Avenue. Officers tried to alert the occupants and after no response forced entry to the home as large flames were engulfing the front of the home. Five people inside the residence were sleeping and officers were able to wake them and evacuate them safely. 

The Redmond Fire Department was able to extinguish the fire and determined the cause of the fire to be from improperly disposed of fireworks. 

Chief Devin Lewis publicly recognized Officers Jeremy Rutledge, Riley Powell, and Sergeant Jered Kirk for their courageous actions during the July 9 City Council meeting.  

Attached is a recording of Officer Powell’s body worn camera footage during the incident.


Local Government Grant Advisory Committee to review grant applications July 22-25
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/11/24 10:26 AM

SALEM, Oregon— The Local Government Grant Program Advisory Committee will hold public meetings to review grant applications from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. July 22-25 via Zoom. 

Applicants to the Local Government Grant Program (LGGP) will present their proposed projects for acquiring, planning, developing and rehabilitating outdoor recreation facilities. The committee will evaluate and score all applications and create a priority ranking list of projects to be funded. The list will be forwarded to the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission for final review and approval. 

A schedule listing applicants and their specific presentation times is posted on the Local Government Grant Program web page at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRA/pages/GRA-lggp.aspx#2 . A link to register for the Zoom meeting is also posted at the site: https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_SdcrlnlBSSmLGtLPLvuTlw

The LGGP Advisory Committee consists of eleven members who represent cities, counties, park and recreation districts, port districts, people with disabilities and the general public. They also represent various geographic areas of the state. 

The LGGP was established in 1999 to direct a portion of state lottery revenue to award grants to eligible applicants for outdoor park and recreation projects. The program is administered by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). 

For more information about the LGGP, visit oprdgrants.org


Press Release: Oregon's Labor Force: What Slower Population Growth and Increasing Retirements Mean for the Workforce
Oregon Employment Department - 07/11/24 10:00 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 
July 11, 2024

CONTACT INFORMATION:
umenauer@oregon.gov">Gail Krumenauer, State Employment Economist
(971) 301-3771
Podcast available at 10:00 a.m. 

Oregon’s Labor Force: What Slower Population Growth 
and Increasing Retirements Mean for the Workforce

The youngest members of the large Baby Boom Generation, born between 1946 and 1964, turn 60 years old in 2024. Workers in this age group have been, and are expected to continue, shifting into retirement and taking their skills and experience with them. 

  • In 1990, one out of 10 Oregon job holders was age 55 or older. By 2022, that share grew to 24%.
  • In 2023, the number of Oregonians not in the labor force due to retirement reached 786,000, an all-time high. Over the past decade, the number of Oregonians not in the labor force due to retirement grew by 160,000 or 26%.

The workforce is aging nationally as well, but Oregon has been at a workforce advantage in boosting its labor force. Decades of population growth – driven primarily by net in-migration – has helped fuel labor force growth, even as the workforce has aged and overall labor force participation rates have generally declined. 

  • Oregon's population grew by 40% between 1993 and 2023, compared with 30% for the U.S.
  • Oregon’s natural increase in population turned negative in 2021 and 2022, with fewer births than deaths, as the COVID-19 pandemic met the long-term trends of an aging population and lower birth rates.
  • In 2021, for the first time in almost four decades, population estimates showed negative net migration, and an overall decline in Oregon’s population.

The declines in natural increase, net migration, and population have contributed to slower labor force growth. Slower gains may be somewhat offset by greater labor force participation among the existing population. 

  • Oregon’s labor force participation rate was 62.4% in 2023, the highest in a decade. That’s still well below the peak of 68.9% in 1998.

During periods like the past couple of years, where low unemployment and relatively large numbers of job openings are paired with slow labor force growth, that creates a tighter labor market for Oregon employers. That makes it harder for employers to find enough workers to fill all their job openings. 

These dynamics may have also contributed to Oregon’s slower job growth in recent years compared to the U.S. Nationally, total nonfarm payroll employment expanded by 3.4% between 2019 and 2023, while Oregon's expanded jobs by 1.2%. This is a change; typically Oregon’s job (and labor force) growth exceeds the nation’s over business cycles. If recent labor force and unemployment trends continue, they might further limit Oregon’s growth potential relative to historic norms and the nation. More details are available in the full report at QualityInfo.org

###




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/930/173675/07.09.24_Aging_Workforce_Slower_Labor_Force_Growth_in_Oregon_News_Release[68].pdf

U.S. 30 between Huntington and I-84 is now open (Photo)
ODOT: East. Ore. - 07/11/24 9:55 AM
Fire near Huntington night of July 10, 2024.
Fire near Huntington night of July 10, 2024.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1204/173704/thumb_Fire_near_Huntington_071024.jpg

U.S. 30 between Huntington and I-84 at the Port of Entry, Exit 354 is now open. The I-84 westbound Exit 354 off-ramp is also open. The highway and off-ramp were closed last night due to a wildfire.




Attached Media Files: Fire near Huntington night of July 10, 2024.

Public comment sought on program serving older adults and people with disabilities
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 07/11/24 9:51 AM

Salem, OR – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), along with the Oregon Health Authority, will hold a forum to receive feedback from the public on implementation of Oregon Project Independence - Medicaid (OPI-M).

OPI-M is being launched by the ODHS Office of Aging and People with Disabilities this year as a result of an 1115 Demonstration Waiver. This forum for public input is referred to as a Post-Award Public Forum by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and is required by federal regulations. It will provide information on the implementation of OPI-M since the waiver was approved by CMS on Feb. 13, 2024, in addition to providing an opportunity for the public to provide feedback. OPI-M operates under the authority of section 1115(a) of the Social Security Act. The waiver is in effect from Feb. 13, 2024, to Jan. 31, 2029.

The forum will be held as a video conference on Zoom on Aug. 5, 2024, from 3 to 4:30 ​p.m. Pacific Time​. American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation and Real-Time Captioning (CART) will also be provided. To request other accommodations, please contact Max Brown by email at rown@odhs.oregon.gov">Max.Brown@odhs.oregon.gov or by phone at 971-707-1019 no later than 48 hours prior to the forum.

Meeting: OPI-M Post-Award Public Forum

When: Aug. 5, 2024, 3 to 4:30 p.m. Pacific Time

Where: Video conference meeting on Zoom

  • To join by video conference: Join Zoom Meeting​
  • To join by phone: dial 669-254-5252; meeting ID: 161 701 1754; passcode: 664575

Additional resources and information about OPI-M:


Fatal Crash - HWY 101- Coos County
Oregon State Police - 07/11/24 8:26 AM

Coos County, Ore. 9 July 24- On Tuesday, July 9, 2024, at 12:27 p.m., Oregon State Police responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy-101, near milepost 243, in Coos County.

The preliminary investigation indicated southbound Honda HRV, operated by Richard Swartling (85) of Coos Bay, attempted to turn left onto Coos-Sumner Lane when it was struck by a northbound Range Rover Evoque, operated by Icel Marie Bair (45) of Nampa (ID), in a side impact collision.

The operator of the Honda (Swartling) was transported to an area hospital where they were later declared deceased.

The operator of the Range Rover (Bair) was seriously injured and transported to an area hospital.

The highway was impacted for approximately five hours during the on-scene investigation. The suspected cause of the crash is speed and impairment.

OSP was assisted by ODOT.

 

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Redmond Fire & Rescue Bans Recreational Fires
Redmond Fire & Rescue - 07/11/24 7:26 AM

Final Update- With the Red Flag Warning expiring and temperatures dropping below 100, the ban on recreational fires has been lifted. If you plan to have a recreational fire keep water nearby in either a bucket or a garden hose, use only approved containers and dispose of ashes properly. Please continue to exercise caution and report any escaped fires immediately. Recreational fires are limited in size to 3ft x 2ft.

 

Update: The Red Flag Warning has been extended into Wednesday July 10. The ban on recreational fires will remain in place.

July 8, 2024-REDMOND, OR- The National Weather Service in Pendleton has issued a Red Flag Warning for dry and unstable conditions, which is in effect until 11 PM PDT Tuesday.

Due to this Red Flag warning, all recreational fires are banned until the Red Flag Warning expires.

AFFECTED AREA...Fire Weather Zones 610 East Slopes of Central
Oregon Cascades, 611 Deschutes National Forest, 639 East Slopes
of the Northern Oregon Cascades, 640 Central Mountains of
Oregon, 694 Yakama Alpine District and 695 East Washington South
Central Cascade Mountains.

TIMING...Today through Tuesday night.

WINDS...North 5 to 15 mph.

RELATIVE HUMIDITY...As low as 8 percent.

TEMPERATURES...Up to 105.

IMPACTS...Any new and existing fires have a strong potential for
extreme fire behavior.

HAINES...As high as 6.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Red Flag Warning means that critical fire weather conditions
are either occurring now, or will shortly. A combination of
strong winds, low relative humidity, and warm temperatures can
contribute to extreme fire behavior.


Larch Creek Fire evacuation levels increase with substantial fire growth to the east
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/11/24 6:41 AM

Dufur, Ore. – With a Red Flag warning across the fire area yesterday the high winds, high temperatures and low relative humidity moved the Larch Creek Fire across Highway 197 and continued its fast-moving growth to the east Wednesday evening. The Wasco County Sheriffs Office and the Incident Commanders of the Unified Command, Central Oregon Type 3 Interagency Incident Management Team and Oregon State Fire Marshal (OSFM) Green Team worked together to quickly elevate the evacuation levels. 

The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Team 2 has been ordered and will be arriving this morning. They will be in unified command with OSFM Green Team starting tomorrow evening.

Air resources, structure task forces, dozers, engines and handcrews worked tirelessly throughout the day.  Resources will remain engaged throughout the night, protecting structures and building fireline. 

Stay informed on updated evacuation alerts here: 

https://www.facebook.com/WascoCountySheriff?ref=embed_page

A Red Cross shelter is open at Maupin High School for all community members effected by the current evacuations.

 Sherman County Fairgrounds is open for evacuation of livestock and pets. Hood River Fairgrounds is also open to displaced animals. Hwy 197 is being closely monitored and may be closed or have traffic control, check Trip Check for updates. Road & Weather Conditions Map | TripCheck - Oregon Traveler Information

Local fire danger levels are “extreme”, everyone is strongly encouraged to realize the current danger of how quickly a fire can start; it only takes one spark. Please do your part, do not park or drive on dry grass, know the current fire restrictions and prepare yourself with a shovel, water and fire extinguisher when outdoors.


Wed. 07/10/24
More people and resources fighting Larch Creek Fire now at 7,100 acres (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/10/24 8:51 PM
Larch Creek Fire photo
Larch Creek Fire photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1072/173682/thumb_IMG_1109.jpg

This update is just for photos from today's fire--all copy/text remains the same

 

Dufur, Ore. – Initial attack crews worked through the night putting in dozer line and burnouts along the east and west flanks from the north down to the unsecured south. The Central Oregon Type 3 Interagency Fire Management Team as well as the Green Incident Management Team from the Oregon State Fire Marshal are in place at the Dufur High School. 

Today, resources from state, local, and federal agencies will work on transitioning night shift crews to day shift while slowing progression towards Highway 197 and nearby Shadybrook community to the south. Some spot fires have been identified in the southern Oak Creek area. Air attack remains a primary resource for day operations. The fire is burning mostly in open grass fuel types. 

The Emergency Conflagration Act was invoked Tuesday night around 8 p.m. which allows the State Fire Marshal to mobilize structural fire resources to protect life and property. Many arrived this morning to assist with structure protection. Three task forces from Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties arrived at 7 a.m. and three additional task forces are arriving later this afternoon. 

Unified Incident Commanders Cason McCain and Lance Lighty, among other officials gave gratitude to the crews on initial attack, as well as local landowners who worked in extreme conditions to set the day shift crews up for success. Red flag warnings remain in place throughout Wednesday from 2-11 p.m. 

Local fire danger levels are now set to “extreme” with expected wind. Stay informed on updated evacuation alerts here: 

https://www.facebook.com/WascoCountySheriff?ref=embed_page

A Red Cross shelter is open at Maupin High School for anyone evacuated. 

More information is on the official Larch Creek Fire Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=61562163967129

The Larch Creek Fire is located 5 miles southwest of Dufur, OR and was first reported July 9, just after 2 p.m. The cause was human activity and is under investigation.

 

FIRE AT A GLANCE 

Estimated Size: 7,100 acres 

Containment: 0% 

Cause: Under investigation, human caused 

Evacuations: 

Level 3 GO NOW – Remains in place for residences from Friend Rd, East to Elliott Rd and Hwy 197, South to Badger Creek Rd, West to Mc Corkle Grade Rd. 

Level 2 GET SET - Remains from Fairgrounds Rd, East to Hwy 197, North to Shadybrook Rd, South to Fairgrounds Rd. Areas east of Hwy 197, east to the Deschutes River, north to Hulse Rd and south to Hwy 216 

Level 1 GET READY - Remains from Badger Creek Rd/Fairgrounds Rd, South to Rock Creek Dam Rd/Wamic Market Rd, West to Threemile Rd, East to Hwy 197. NEW AREA Elliott Rd, East to Kingsley Rd./Dufur Gap Rd., North to Friend Rd. and South to Level 3 border.




Attached Media Files: Larch Creek Fire photo , Larch Creek Fire photo , Larch Creek Fire photo , Larch Creek Fire photo

Missing child alert -- Nevaeh Rohrbach is missing and is believed to be in danger (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 07/10/24 4:18 PM
Nevaeh Rohrbach
Nevaeh Rohrbach
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/973/173681/thumb_Nevaeh_Rohrbach_hires.jpg

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find Nevaeh “Rihanna” Rohrbach, age 15, a child in foster care who went missing from Clackamas on June 21. Nevaeh is believed to be in danger.

ODHS asks the public for help in the effort to find Nevaeh and to contact 911, local law enforcement or the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233) if they believe they see her.

Nevaeh is suspected to be in the SE Portland area.                        

Name: Nevaeh “Rihanna” Rohrbach
Pronouns: She/her
Date of birth: Sept. 6, 2008
Height: 5-foot-7 
Weight: 125 pounds
Hair: Light brown or blonde. Nevaeh frequently dyes her hair. 
Eye color: Bluish-green
Other identifying information: Nevaeh has a tattoo of a cross on her left finger, a tattoo of a half-moon on her left hand, and a sad face tattoo on her right ankle. She also goes by Rihanna sometimes times. 
Clackamas County Sheriff Office case #24-12779
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #2025507

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

###




Attached Media Files: Nevaeh Rohrbach

Oregon Heritage Commission to meet July 21-22 in Coos Bay and online
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/10/24 3:14 PM

SALEM, Oregon – The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet July21-22 in Coos Bay and online. The agenda includes a report from the University of Oregon Institute for Policy Research and Engagement project team on the 2024 Oregon Heritage Vitality Study, a summary and discussion of a report on addressing harmful content in collections, an application for the Heritage Tradition designation, and recommendations for the Commission’s FY25 Oregon Cultural Trust Partner Funds Grant. 

This meeting is open to the public and there is an opportunity at the beginning of the meeting for public comment in person and online. For online attendance, registration is required. To view the full agenda and/or to register for the virtual meeting option visit here

Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986‐0690 or y.Newcomb@oprd.oregon.gov">Mary.Newcomb@oprd.oregon.gov at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

There are three governor appointed positions currently vacant on the Oregon Heritage Commission. The Heritage Commission is especially seeking members with knowledge and experience related to community institutions, heritage tourism, or education/higher education and who have experience working with diverse cultural groups. The Commission seeks applications from those that live in the Southern, Willamette Valley, and Central Oregon area. 

The Heritage Commission’s nine members represent a diversity of cultural, geographic, and institutional interests. The Commission is the primary agency for coordination of heritage activities in the state. This includes carrying out the Oregon Heritage Plan, increasing efficiency and avoiding duplication among interest groups, developing plans for coordination among agencies and organizations, encouraging tourism related to heritage resources, and coordinating statewide anniversary celebrations.

The group meets four-six times per year in changing locations around the state and will offer virtual options to attend meetings. Commissioners are also asked to occasionally participate in meetings or events in their regions and work on other projects outside of meeting time. Appointed Commissioners are reimbursed for their travel and related expenses while conducting official commission business.

More information about the Oregon Heritage Commission is available online at www.oregonheritage.org and from Commission Coordinator Katie Henry at 503-877-8834 or katie.henry@oprd.oregon.gov

To request appointment, go to Governor Kotek’s Boards and Commissions webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/gov/Pages/board-list.aspx


Portland Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Role in Fraud Scheme
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/10/24 1:51 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Portland man was sentenced to federal prison today for his role in a scheme to steal large quantities of mail and use victims’ personal and financial documents and information to fraudulently obtain apartment leases, open bank accounts without authorization, and acquire other goods and services.

Cody Joel Stewart, 43, was sentenced to 51 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release. Stewart was also ordered to pay $211,831 in restitution to his victims.

According to court documents, between April 2020 and April 2023, Stewart worked with multiple accomplices, including Portland residents Felicia Lynn Hawkins and Patrick Dorin Balan, both 35, to carry out a fraud scheme whereby the group would steal large quantities of mail to obtain victims’ personal and financial information.

Throughout the conspiracy, Stewart and Hawkins used and distributed stolen personally identifiable information and counterfeit identity documents and checks. In December 2022, during a search of their shared residence, investigators located and seized various counterfeit identification and financial documents, stolen financial documents and mail, paper used to make counterfeit checks, U.S. Treasury checks, counterfeit U.S. currency, and drugs.

Stewart was arrested in May 2023 after leading police on a high-speed chase reaching speeds of more than 100 mph. After safely ending the pursuit, officers located additional stolen identification and financial documents in Stewart’s possession.

On April 11, 2023, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a 12-count indictment charging Stewart, Hawkins, and Balan with conspiracy to commit bank fraud; bank fraud; using or trafficking an unauthorized access device; producing, using, or trafficking a counterfeit access device; aggravated identity theft; and possession of stolen mail.

On March 27, 2024, Stewart pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit bank fraud and aggravated identity theft.

On January 29, 2024, Hawkins also pleaded guilty to conspiring to commit bank fraud. She was later sentenced to time served in federal prison and five years’ supervised release. Balan is on pre-trial release pending a four-day jury trial scheduled to begin on August 6, 2024.

This case was investigated by Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) with assistance from the U.S. Postal Inspection Service (USPIS), U.S. Small Business Administration – Office of Inspector General (SBA-OIG), and U.S. Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA). It was prosecuted by Rachel K. Sowray, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: 2024-07/6325/173666/SENTENCING-Stewart-Final.pdf

Applicant Review Committee Meeting
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/10/24 12:55 PM

APPLICANT REVIEW COMMITTEE

MEETING SCHEDULED

                           

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Applicant Review Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, July 24, 2024, at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Juan Lopez (503) 551-3167.

Effective Jan. 1, 2024, the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training will be live streaming all public meetings via YouTube. Meetings will no longer be streamed on Facebook. To view the Applicant Review Committee's live-stream and other recorded videos, please visit DPSST’s official YouTube page at https://www.youtube.com/@DPSST.

Agenda Items:

1. Introductions

2. Approve June 26, 2024, Meeting Minutes

3. Dalton Cable, DPSST No. 65167; Oregon State Police
    Presented by Cindy Park

4. Inquiry Closure Memos – Information Only
    Presented by Cindy Park

5. Next Applicant Review Committee Meeting – August 28, 2024, at 11:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Applicant Review Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

Stay Connected with the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training:

Nine Cultural Attractions Offer Free Admission and Special Events to Oregon and Washington Educators July 28--August 10
Oregon Historical Society - 07/10/24 11:39 AM

Portland, OR — From July 28–August 10, Oregon and Washington educators are invited to visit Aurora Colony Museum and Historical Society, Five Oaks Museum, Japanese American Museum of Oregon, Lan Su Chinese Garden, Maryhill Museum of Art, Oregon Historical Society, Pittock Mansion, Portland Art Museum, and Portland Chinatown Museum for free as well as take part in educator-focused events and tours. 

Educators can let staff at each institution’s admissions desk know that they are an educator to access free admission (no school identification required).

Local cultural attractions are powerful resources for educators, offering resources and programs to support educators’ work in classrooms. From professional development workshops to state standards-aligned curriculum and lesson plans to digital resources, educators can access a wide range of tools to enhance their teaching at no cost. Educators are encouraged to take advantage of these free admission weeks to learn about the unique resources available at each institution as well as participate in special events and tours created specifically for teachers.

Participating Institutions & Program Schedule:

Please note that while some institutions request reservations to attend these programs, any educator who would like to attend will be welcomed. 

Aurora Colony Museum and Historical Society
15018 2nd Street NE
Aurora, OR 97002
Hours: Monday–Saturday, 10am5pm; Sunday, 12pm5pm

Aurora Colony Museum Stauffer-Will Farm Educator Tour and Overview
Wednesday, July 31, 1pm3pm
Please RSVP to han@auroracolony.org">siobhan@auroracolony.org if you plan to attend.

Five Oaks Museum
Portland Community College Rock Creek Campus
17677 NW Springville Road
Portland, OR 97229
Hours: Thursday–Saturday, 12pm–4pm

Five Oaks Museum Educator Tour and Resource Share
Saturday, August 10, 10:30am–12pm
Please register here if you plan to attend.

Japanese American Museum of Oregon
411 NW Flanders Street
Portland, OR 97209
Note: Use the entrance around the corner on 4th
Hours: Wednesday–Saturday, 10am–4pm; Sunday, 11am–4pm

Japanese American Museum of Oregon Educator Tours and Resource Sharing
Tuesday, July 30, 1pm–2:30pm
Tuesday, August 6, 1pm–2:30pm
Please RSVP to info@jamo.org if you plan to attend one of the tours.

Lan Su Chinese Garden
239 NW Everett Street
Portland, OR 97209
Hours: MondaySunday, 10am6pm 

Lan Su Chinese Garden Educator Tour 
followed by resource sharing and tea 
Friday, August 2, 1pm2:30pm
Please register here if you plan to attend.

Maryhill Museum of Art
35 Maryhill Museum Drive
Goldendale, WA 98620
Hours: Monday–Sunday, 10am–5pm (from March 15–November 15)

Maryhill Museum of Art Educator Tour and Refreshments
followed by resource discussion
Saturday, August 10, 1pm
Please register here if you plan to attend.

Oregon Historical Society
1200 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205
Hours: Monday–Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 12pm–5pm

Oregon Historical Society Educator Tours and Overview of Educator Resources 
Tuesday, July 30, 10am–12pm 
Tuesday, August 6, 10am–12pm
Please register here if you plan to attend one of the tours.

Pittock Mansion
3229 NW Pittock Drive
Portland, OR 97210
Hours: Tuesday 12pm–5pm, Wednesday–Monday 10am–5pm

Pittock Mansion Educator Tour and Resources
Wednesday, August 7, 10:30am–12pm 
Please RSVP to kwilliams@pittockmansion.org if you plan to attend.

Portland Art Museum
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205
Hours: Thursday and Friday 10am–8pm, Saturday and Sunday 10am–6pm

Portland Art Museum Educator Welcome and Tour
Thursday, August 8 at 1pm–2:30pm
Please register here if you plan to attend.

Portland Chinatown Museum
127 NW Third Avenue, Portland
Hours: Thursday–Sunday 11am–3pm

Portland Chinatown Museum Educator Tour
Friday, August 2, 11am–12:30pm
Please RSVP to info@portlandchinatown.org with your first and last name if you plan to attend.


Central Oregon District enters higher fire danger, issues restrictions to help prevent wildfires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/10/24 11:35 AM

PRINEVILLE, Ore. – All lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry’s (ODF) Central Oregon District are now in Industrial Fire Precaution Level (IFPL) 3 in MH-1 (portions of Hood River and Wasco counties).

With continued high temperatures, winds and drying fuels, the district is issuing public restrictions and regulated use closures in recognition of the increasing fire danger in order to reduce the risk of human-caused fires.

The Central Oregon District restricts the following activities:

  • Use of fireworks and blasting is prohibited.
  • No debris burning, including piles and debris burned in burn barrels.
  • Open fires are prohibited, including campfires, charcoal fires, cooking fires and warming fires, except in designated areas. Propane fire pits and camp stoves are allowed but require one shovel and one gallon of water or one 2 ½ pound fire extinguisher on site.
  • Chainsaw use and mowing of dried grass is prohibited, between the hours of 1 p.m. and 8 p.m. One hour fire watch required.
  • No smoking while traveling through or working in any operation area.

 Restricted Shutdown: The following activities are not permitted at any time, except as noted: 

  • Cable yarding systems, except that gravity operated logging systems using non-motorized carriages or approved motorized carriages may operate between 8 p.m. and 1 p.m., when all blocks and moving lines are suspended at least 10 feet above the ground (except the line between the carriage and the chokers). An approved motorized carriage is defined as a cable yarding system employing a motorized carriage with two fire extinguishers, each with at least a 2A:10 BC rating, mounted securely on opposite sides of the carriage, an emergency motor cutoff, and an approved exhaust system. 

In addition to the fire prevention requirements Under IFPL III (three), the following activities are not permitted between the hours of 1 p.m. and 8 p.m., except as noted:

  • Power saws may operate at loading sites;
  • Feller-bunchers with rotary head saws;
  • Cable yarding
  • Blasting
  • Welding, cutting, or grinding of metal

Additional fire restrictions or regulations may apply depending on the various fire risks. Check the full list of restrictions at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/fire/pages/restrictions.aspx.

For more information on the Central Oregon District and fire season regulations, visit https://odfcentraloregon.com/.

The less human-caused fires we have, the less the district’s resources are strained. For tips on wildfire prevention, visit www.keeporegongreen.org.


Media Advisory: 142nd Wing to host F-15EX Eagle II Unveiling Ceremony
Oregon Military Department - 07/10/24 11:19 AM

for planning purposes only – not for print or air

The 142nd Wing out of the Portland Air National Guard Base, Portland, Oregon will host a ceremony unveiling the F-15EX Eagle II fighter jet at its first operational unit in the U.S. Air Force this Friday, 12 July 2024. Attending this ceremony will be the Governor of the State of Oregon and Commander in Chief of the Oregon National Guard, Honorable Tina Kotek and U.S. Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon.

Media is asked to RSVP by Thursday, 11 July. Interviews with distinguished visitors to include Maj. Gen. Duke Pirak, Acting Director of the Air National Guard and former Oregon Air National Guardsman, will be available between 8:30 and 9:00 a.m. Please arrive at the base main gate, 6801 NE Cornfoot Rd, Portland, Ore. 97218, no later than 8:00 a.m. if you would like to conduct interviews. 

The F-15EX is a replacement for the F-15C/D fleet that complements Combat Air Forces with affordability, speed, range, payload and rapid technology paths. The USAF currently operates six F-15EX aircraft at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida for testing, and the Air National Guard has received their first two at Portland Air National Guard Base, Portland, Oregon. The 142nd Wing is the first unit in the USAF to operate the F-15EX for real-world missions. 

-30-

Footage of the arrival of the first F-15EX at Portland can be downloaded at the following link: DVIDS - Video - First Aircraft Arrival F-15EX at the Portland Air National Guard Base (dvidshub.net)

About the 142nd Wing:

The Portland Air National Guard Base employs 1,500 Airmen who provide an economic impact of nearly $500 million to the region. The 142nd Wing defends our homeland with F-15 Eagle fighter jets, guarding the Pacific Northwest skies from northern California to the Canadian border through their Aerospace Control Alert mission as part of Air Combat Command and the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Their mission is to provide unequalled, mission-ready units to sustain combat aerospace superiority and peacetime tasking any time, any place in service to our nation, state and community.


LUBGWMA well users encouraged to retest water for nitrates, OHA to continue offering free well testing
Oregon Health Authority - 07/10/24 10:48 AM

July 10, 2024 

Media Contact: Larry Bingham, 971-239-6499, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov 

LUBGWMA well users encouraged to retest water for nitrates, OHA to continue offering free well testing   

Latest effort is the next step following summer 2023 campaign that offered free testing, treatment 

PORTLAND, Ore. — People in the Lower Umatilla Basin Groundwater Management Area (LUBGWMA) who had their well water tested for nitrates in 2023 are encouraged to take advantage of free retesting to make sure their water remains safe.  

The LUBGWMA is an area spanning northern Morrow County and northwestern Umatilla County designated by the state due to high nitrate levels in groundwater that supplies domestic wells. 

Oregon Health Authority (OHA), in partnership with Morrow and Umatilla counties and a coalition of community-based organizations, mailed a letter in English and Spanish on May 15 to about 1,600 households that completed initial well water tests in 2023. The mailing included a brochure in English and Spanish that encourages people to take advantage of free retesting of their well water.  

On June 12, the same households received letters with individual results of their past tests and a brochure to help them understand the results, as well as instructions, time frame and frequency for retesting their well based on their previous results. 

Retesting of households with well water close to the health action level of 10 milligrams nitrate per liter (mg/L) of water is especially important because nitrate levels can fluctuate during different seasons of the year. Nitrate in well water is a potential health hazard, and levels above 10 mg/L are considered dangerous for human consumption. Pregnant people and babies face the greatest risk.  

Anyone who lives in the LUBGWMA can get a free laboratory analysis of their well water by visiting the website testmywell.oregon.gov or emailing Domestic.Wells@odhsoha.oregon.gov. They can also call the OHA Domestic Well Safety Program at 541-952-9254. 

Households with a laboratory nitrate test result above 10 mg/L can receive free water delivery. For households whose well water tests higher than 10 mg/L but under 25 mg/L, the state will pay for installation and maintenance of one in-home reverse-osmosis system that is certified to reduce nitrate levels to safe for drinking (treatment systems are not certified to remove nitrate at levels above 25 mg/L). Households with a laboratory nitrate test result higher than 25 can receive free water delivery. 

OHA is coordinating the re-testing outreach effort in close partnership with Morrow County Public Health Department, Umatilla County Public Health Department, Oregon Department of Human Services, and many community organizations: Doulas Latinas, Eastern Oregon Center for Independent Living, Euvalcree, National Center for Alternatives to Pesticides, Oregon Rural Action and Water for Eastern Oregon (H2OEO). These organizations can help connect domestic well users to the safe water services offered by the state through OHA. 

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State CIO named Chair of the Board of Directors for Link Oregon (Photo)
State of Oregon - 07/10/24 10:27 AM
2024-07/838/173652/Terrence_Woods.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/838/173652/thumb_Terrence_Woods.jpg

Salem, OR – On June 24, 2024, Oregon’s State Chief Information Officer Terrence Woods assumed the role of Chair of the Board of Directors for Link Oregon, the middle-mile broadband service provider for Oregon’s non-profit and public sectors. Woods, who leads Oregon’s Enterprise Information Services, will serve as chair for the fiscal year 2025, which began July 1, following his service as vice chair for the fiscal year 2024.

Woods resumes the role, which he previously held for fiscal year 2023, from Andrea Ballinger, Vice Provost for University Information and Technology and Chief Information Officer for Oregon State University. Ballinger was the chair for the fiscal year 2024. Abhijit Pandit, Vice President and Chief Information Officer for University of Oregon assumed the role of vice chair and chair-elect.

The change in roles was announced at Link Oregon’s annual member meeting, also on June 24, which brought together a diverse community of members and partners in the broadband ecosystem from Oregon and across the country highlighting insights about broadband and digital equity efforts. Panelists included local, statewide, and regional leaders from Oregon K-12, public libraries, and local government, as well as broadband leaders from Nevada and Utah. The full recording of the Annual Member Meeting is available here.

Woods has provided support since the formation of Link Oregon, which is a consortium led by five founding entities: Oregon Health & Sciences University, Oregon State University, Portland State University, the University of Oregon, and Oregon’s Enterprise Information Services

“As we move into our new fiscal year, I am proud of the work we have accomplished and am excited to continue with our mission and meeting the needs of Oregon’s public sector and non-profit organizations across the state.” Woods said.

Established to consolidate and enhance efforts to develop a high-speed, middle-mile network serving the unique needs of public service, research, and education entities, Link Oregon’s services are available for state offices, higher education, K-12 schools and education service districts (ESDs), libraries, public healthcare facilities, Oregon Tribes, and other public and non-profit organizations across the state. The non-profit organization is also involved in a number of research computing and digital equity efforts across the state.




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/838/173652/Terrence_Woods.jpg

Smoke Management Advisory Committee meets on July 17
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/10/24 9:57 AM

SALEM, Ore. — The Smoke Management Advisory Committee will meet Wednesday, July 17, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the ODF Headquarters, Building C, Tillamook Room, 2600 State Street, Salem. To join virtually, please use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda

The committee’s agenda includes:

  • Welcome and roll call
  • Committee business
  • Committee & agency reports
  • Smoke Management Unit FY24 budget
  • Rulemaking process - Update/planning/recommendations
  • Spring burning overview

The meeting is open to the public to attend either in person or virtually. There will be a period for public comment in the morning. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting y.berry@odf.oregon.gov">Shelby Berry at 503-949-5181.

View more information on the SMAC webpage.

Created by the Legislature in 1989, the five-member committee assists and advises the Oregon Department of Forestry in carrying out its Smoke Management Program. Members are appointed by the State Forester to serve a two-year term, which is renewable.


Diverse cannabis entrepreneurs receive a $110,000 boost from Oregon-based Nimble Distro (Photo)
Berg & Associates - 07/10/24 9:00 AM
Christine Walsh (left), Marissa Rodriguez (middle left), Jeanette Ward (middle right) and Joy Hudson (right) attend a NuProject networking event
Christine Walsh (left), Marissa Rodriguez (middle left), Jeanette Ward (middle right) and Joy Hudson (right) attend a NuProject networking event
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/6329/173643/thumb_Nimble_NuProject_Majik_Networking.jpg

Oregon wholesale cannabis distribution company has directed 50 cents of every pack of KITES pre-rolls sold to local nonprofit NuProject since September 2021

Milwaukie, Ore., July 10, 2024—A $35,000 low-interest loan that allowed a Black woman-owned cannabis company to grow into a booming business. A networking event that opened doors for an Indigenous woman to grow her company’s market share. 

More opportunities like these will be available in Oregon and beyond through a partnership between cannabis wholesaler Nimble Distro and NuProject, an Oregon-founded nonprofit that supports diverse cannabis entrepreneurs with funding, mentorship and network connections.

Nimble Distro has donated $110,000 to NuProject since September 2021. And the need is great. Black women, for example, received less than 1% of the $288 billion that venture capital firms funded in 2022, according to the Fearless Fund, a venture capital fund that awards Black women entrepreneurs.

“Intention is plenty; action that drives change is rare,” said Jeannette Ward, president and chief executive officer of NuProject. “Nimble is an example all companies should follow. Their regular, unrestricted funds have become the lifeblood of our organization. In turn, we have enabled the growth of a more diverse cannabis industry across the U.S.”

Nimble Distro donates to NuProject 50 cents for every sold pack of KITES, a 10-pack of pre-rolls sourced from producers who share the company’s values.

“We have built reparations into our cost of goods to help create generational wealth for communities disproportionately harmed by the War on Drugs,” said Joy Hudson, chief executive officer and co-founder of Nimble. “Our business and giving model allow us to make tangible and ongoing impacts on critical issues.”

Nimble’s contribution a game-changer for diverse founders

NuProject has funded more than $3.7 million to historically excluded founders primarily via low-interest loans and grants. NuProject has also delivered more than 2,500 hours of entrepreneur coaching to a network of more than 200 founders.

Nimble’s funding stream allows NuProject to fund diverse-owned businesses at a rate that eclipses traditional lenders. For instance, NuProject recently granted a $35,000 low-interest loan to Calyxeum, a Detroit-based cannabis grower, wholesaler, and retailer owned by Rebecca Colett and LaToyia Rucker, two Black women with degrees in science, health and technology.

NuProject’s loan covered Calyxeum’s start-up costs, allowing the business to boom in its first five years. Calyxeum now operates two cannabis growing facilities and one processing facility. It opened its first retail dispensary in April 2024 in Detroit. Beyond growing a booming business, Colett and Rucker have also created a business incubator for Black women in cannabis and a nonprofit that leads neighborhood improvement projects.

Growing an ecosystem for a better world

Nimble and NuProject have also supported Majik Edibles, an Oregon-based, Indigenous woman-owned producer of fine THC-infused baked goods. Majik co-founder and owner Christine Walsh came close to closing Majik’s doors in the fall of 2021 when shifts in the cannabis market made it nearly impossible to be competitive.

Walsh received an economic justice grant from NuProject, which she credits with saving her company. NuProject also introduced Walsh to Nimble co-founders Joy Hudson and Marissa Rodriguez at a networking event, and their connection was instantaneous. Nimble began distributing Majik’s products in October 2022.

“Our partnership with Nimble and NuProject is based on a shared purpose of forging the cannabis industry forward in a way that lifts up historically excluded founders and creates the space we deserve/need and the world we envision,” Walsh said.

Hudson refers to their partnership with Majik and NuProject as an ecosystem building a better, more equitable world. “Partnering with Majik is this really perfect completion for us of our global vision for Nimble of doing well and doing good,” said Hudson.

Support for additional nonprofits

Nimble supports other local nonprofits through sales of other in-house products, including Northwest Abortion Access and Pride Northwest. To date, Nimble has donated:

  •  Nearly $6,100 to the Northwest Abortion Access Fund through sales of Broomsticks, a high-end green witch-inspired 1-gram pre-roll.
  • $5,530 during Pride Month 2023 to Pride Northwest through sales of Orchid Essentials, Nimble’s revolutionary vape cartridges and batteries designed and formulated to deliver the best user experience and ultimate satisfaction. 

Learn more about Nimble by visiting www.nimbledistro.com.

About Nimble Distro

Nimble Distro is a leading wholesale distribution company in the cannabis industry. Powered by a proficient logistics and manufacturing engine, Nimble Distro drives profitability and positive social impact by forging collaborative partnerships with premier cannabis cultivators and processors. With a focus on product excellence and community engagement, Nimble Distro is committed to reshaping the future of the cannabis industry.




Attached Media Files: Christine Walsh (left), Marissa Rodriguez (middle left), Jeanette Ward (middle right) and Joy Hudson (right) attend a NuProject networking event

Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled (08/07/2024)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/10/24 8:15 AM

TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICY COMMITTEE

MEETING SCHEDULED

                                   

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Telecommunications Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting on August 7, 2024, at 9:00 a.m. in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Juan Lopez at (503) 551-3167.

Effective Jan. 1, 2024, the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training will be live streaming all public meetings via YouTube. Meetings will no longer be streamed on Facebook. To view the Telecommunications Policy Committee's live-stream and other recorded videos, please visit DPSST’s official YouTube page at https://www.youtube.com/@DPSST.

Agenda Items

1. Introductions

2. Approve May 1, 2024, Meeting Minutes

3. Administrative Closures Consent Agenda (The following items to be ratified by one vote)

     Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

     a. Tabetha Daugherty; DPSST No. 53558

     Basic Emergency Medical Dispatcher and Basic and Intermediate Telecommunicator Certifications

     b. Cassandra Griffith; DPSST No. 43266

     Basic Emergency Medical Dispatcher and Basic, Intermediate, Advanced and Supervisory Telecommunicator Certifications

4. Matthew Olson; DPSST No. 58203; Willamette Valley Communications Center

     Presented by Jennifer Levario

5. Agency Updates

6. Next Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting: November 6, 2024, at 9:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Telecommunications Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

 


Tue. 07/09/24
Firefighters and local resources respond to Larch Creek Fire in Wasco County
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/09/24 9:50 PM

The Dalles, Ore. – Firefighters from the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Central Oregon District, U.S. Forest Service, local fire districts and landowners have quickly responded to a wildfire near Friend, OR. Firefighters are under initial attack and will continue operations into the night. The fire is currently burning with moderate-to-high spread, estimated at 3,500 acres in grass and timber fuel types. Containment is at 0%. 

The Larch Creek Fire is located 5 miles southwest of Dufur, OR near Friend, OR. It is burning southeast of Winslow Road in Township 2S Range 13E, which is west of Highway 97.

Last reported resources: 8 engines, 20-person hand crew from USFS Mt Hood, 4 dozers, local landowner resources, and multiple air resources. A Type 3 Central Oregon Fire Management Service team has been ordered and is in route. 

With high temperatures, low humidity, and difficult terrain, suppression efforts are requiring diverse methods of attack, prioritizing safety while protecting life and structures. Increased winds are playing a significant factor in fire behavior. No structures have been reported lost.

Evacuations: Level 3 - GO NOW - Evacuate from Clark Miller Road east to Hix Rd, North to Kingley-Friend Market Rd., South to Badger Creek Rd.

Level 2 - BE SET to evacuate from the following areas: Mc Corkle Rd south to Happy Ridge Rd, East to J Hix Rd, West to FS Rd 2700.

Level 1 - BE READY in Tygh Valley, Pine Hollow, and Wamic.

The Wasco County Fairgrounds is a temporarily designated evacuation point for livestock. A Red Cross Evacuation Shelter is opening at Maupin High School.

https://www.facebook.com/WascoCountySheriff or the Wasco County Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/wascocounty/ 

The fire started sometime around 2 p.m. on Tuesday, July 9, 2024. The cause is under investigation. 


OSFM mobilizes resources to Larch Creek Fire in Wasco County
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/09/24 9:23 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon State Fire Marshal is mobilizing four structural task forces and its green incident management team to the Larch Creek Fire burning in Wasco County, 16 miles south of The Dalles.

The fire sparked between Dufur and Tygh Valley around 3 p.m. Tuesday and has quickly grown. The fire is estimated at 2,500 acres. The Wasco County Sheriff’s Office has levels 1, 2, and 3 evacuations in place. 

The area remains under a Red Flag Warning for critical fire weather. On Tuesday, temperatures reached 107 degrees. Gusty winds are expected to continue into Wednesday.

Three structural task forces will be briefed at 6:00 a.m. Wednesday morning with another task force joining later in the afternoon. 

“The heat wave that has gripped Oregon significantly increased the fire danger across the state. The continued hot, dry conditions, and gusty winds are a dangerous combination,” Chief Deputy State Fire Marshal Travis Medema said. “I am asking everyone to do what they can to prevent sparking a wildfire.” 

Tuesday night, Oregon Governor Tina Kotek invoked the Emergency Conflagration Act for the fire which allows the state fire marshal to mobilize state resources to protect life and property.

Following ORS 476.510-476.610, Governor Kotek determined that threats to life, safety, and property exist because of the fire, and the threats exceed the capabilities of local firefighting personnel and equipment. 

For the latest on evacuations, follow the Wasco County Sheriff’s Office.


Sunriver Police Department requesting public assistance in animal abuse case (Photo)
Sunriver Police Dept. - 07/09/24 7:04 PM
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Release Date: July 9, 2024

Location: Sunriver Utilities Company - 18305 Cottonwood Road

On July 9th, at approximately 7:50 am, the Sunriver Police Department was notified by an employee of the Sunriver Utilities Company that they had found a cardboard box containing several deceased puppies near the gate at the Cottonwood Road entry. A patrol sergeant responded and located the box with four to six very young, deceased puppies of an unknown breed. Due to decomposition, it was difficult to discern the actual number of puppies. The deceased puppies were then transported to the Central Oregon Humane Society for proper disposal. 

This case is currently under investigation. There are no security cameras in the area and no known suspects at this time. 

The Sunriver Police Department would like to encourage anyone with information to please contact us. You can remain anonymous or leave your name, but any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

 

Investigating Officer: Sergeant J. Beck

541-693-6911

SRPD Case # 24-3715




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Survey of Oregonians: Artificial Intelligence
Oregon Values and Beliefs Center - 07/09/24 3:09 PM

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

OREGONIANS BY THE NUMBERS AND IN THEIR OWN WORDS

KEY FINDINGS

AND COMMENTARY BY PROFESSOR REBEKAH HANEY, UNIVERSITY OF OREGON SCHOOL OF LAW

SUMMATION QUOTES

Amaury Vogel, Executive Director:

  • “While some Oregonians note potential benefits of AI, many of us feel like we’re not quite up to speed on how to really tap into its potential.”
  • “Oregonians are hopeful about AI’s potential to advance research and medicine, but they’re worried about negative impacts on education, jobs, politics, and art. They’re concerned enough about the impact on jobs, they want to make sure people who lose their jobs due to advances in AI receive unemployment benefits.”
  • When discussing necessary measures in response to AI development, seven out of ten Oregonians support incentivizing technology that gives low- and middle-income residents more affordable access to necessities, like food, housing, and utilities. Oregonians also generally support international cooperation with allies to try to prevent AI being used for weaponry and cyberwarfare.” 
  • “When it comes to making decisions about artificial intelligence, the scientific community is seen as the most trustworthy, but even ordinary people are seen as more trustworthy than the government.” 

FULL RESEARCH SUMMARY CAN BE FOUND ON OVBC WEBSITE, INCLUDING GRAPHS AND WORD CLOUDS, AND ALL DATA FILES: Artificial Intelligence - Oregon Values and Beliefs Center (oregonvbc.org)

COMMENTARY BY PROFESSOR REBEKAH HANEY

Comment on OVBC AI Survey Findings and Generative AI

Rebekah Hanley

 

Generative artificial intelligence (“AI”) is older than many realize; indeed, OpenAI introduced its first GPT (short for “Generative Pre-trained Transformer”) in 2018.  Still, the November 2022 public launch of ChatGPT 3.5 brought widespread access to the tool.  That access shined a bright light on the power, possibilities, and perils of large language models (“LLMs”), AI tools capable of quickly generating polished prose that seems like it was carefully crafted by humans.  As a legal writing professor at the University of Oregon, I have been contemplating the profound implications of LLMs’ fluency, range, and speed since the first time I saw one “write.”  And, like other educators (and students and parents); private-sector leaders and workers; and government officials, I am laboring to stay current in a rapidly shifting landscape, to adjust longstanding policies and practices, and to plan for the future of writing in an AI-enhanced world.

The launch of ChatGPT 3.5, with its accompanying media coverage of related technology, impacted Oregonians’ views about all AI.  Oregon Values and Beliefs Center’s August and December 2023 statewide studies captured the AI-related hopes, fears, and concerns of Oregonians; those findings may help the Oregon legislature consider how AI affects the state’s economy and social well-being.  The surveys show that Oregonians’ greatest concerns about AI center on control, safety, security, and malicious use, with almost three of every four respondents worrying about unintended, unmanageable consequences and exploitation for destructive purposes.  In the short term, Oregonians view the social, political, and economic effects of AI as materially more threatening to humanity than climate change, though in the long term they regard those two types of threats as about equal.  On balance, over a quarter of those surveyed think that AI’s benefits do not outweigh its risks in the short and long term; an additional eleven percent of respondents believe that even AI’s short-term benefits do not outweigh its risks.

But Oregonians’ opinions on these matters are to some extent uninformed.  As of August 2023, only thirty percent of respondents reported having personally experienced ChatGPT, which had been freely available to the public for over eight months.  Almost as many respondents did not know that ChatGPT was an example of AI; many respondents did not realize that AI has long been integrated into numerous commonly used digital platforms and tools.

The survey results reflect a sense of urgency around responding—in some way—to the shifting landscape.  In August 2023, almost sixty percent of respondents wanted both the federal and state governments to issue regulations ensuring that AI research and development serves the public interest, though fewer than twenty percent of respondents trusted government entities to make AI-related decisions.  Perhaps surprisingly, respondents trusted AI creators and marketers to self-regulate more than they trusted governments to regulate AI.  Four months later, that had shifted: The suggestion that corporations developing AI products should self-regulate enjoyed half as much strong support as the call for government regulation.  And while two-thirds of Oregonians believed that state officials lack the necessary expertise to regulate AI, over a third thought the state should move forward with regulation regardless of its expertise deficiency.

Oregonians expressed mixed opinions about how the state should respond to generative AI’s utility and risks.  Some Oregonians see opportunity and hope that the state will capitalize on it, becoming a leader in the sector by recruiting AI companies and research organizations.  At the same time, one in five Oregonians suggests that the state ban the use of new AI models by government employees.  With its diverse positions, Oregon mirrors the nation: the Pew Research Center has recently documented divergent views and uncertainty among teachers (about AI tools’ benefits and harms to K-12 education) and among the general public (about whether AI tools should cite source materials).

 

Overall, Oregonians recognize that AI is here to stay. Almost two-thirds of those surveyed agreed that K-12 AI literacy programs are necessary, likely in part to prepare students for the jobs of the future.  This vision of the future triggers financial concern: Almost three-fourths of those surveyed agreed that unemployment benefits should be available for workers whose jobs become obsolete due to AI.  These are logical reactions to the pace of generative AI improvement: Corporations are investing aggressively in this technology, and new products are being tailored for specific contexts and to minimize known risks and weaknesses. While simply ignoring the technology is not a viable strategy, specifically how educators and others should react to generative AI’s growth raises open—and challenging—questions; finding answers will require creativity and cautious, but bold, experimentation.

 

Professor Rebekah Hanley has been a faculty member at the University of Oregon School of Law since 2004.  She teaches foundational lawyering skills to first-year law students; she also teaches professional responsibility and advanced legal writing courses.  As Oregon Law’s current Galen Scholar in Legal Writing, Professor Hanley is studying generative AI and its implications for law school teaching and the practice of law.

 




Attached Media Files: Dec-Jan Verbatims , Dec-Jan Annotated Questionnaire , Dec-Jan Crosstabs , July-Aug Verbatims , July-Aug Annotated Questionnaire , July-Aug Crosstabs , Research Summary - AI , Prof. Haney Commentary - AI

Oregon among 27 states with illnesses linked to mushroom-derived candies
Oregon Health Authority - 07/09/24 3:06 PM

July 9, 2024

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Oregon among 27 states with illnesses linked to mushroom-derived candies

Prophet Premium Blends in California recalling Diamond Shruumz products

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon is one of 27 states with cases of a severe acute illness associated with a brand of candies that contain a potentially harmful chemical found in mushrooms, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notified epidemiologists at the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Public Health Division July 5 that Oregon is now part of a nationwide FDA outbreak investigation involving products manufactured by Prophet Premium Blends of Santa Ana, Calif.

The company has issued a recall of chocolate bars, cones and gummies sold under the brand Diamond Shruumz, including “Micro- and Mega/Extreme-Dose” versions of the products. According to the FDA, the products contain muscimol, a chemical found in mushrooms of the genus Amanita, and which could cause symptoms consistent with those observed in persons who became ill after eating Diamond Shruumz products. These products are not regulated for consumer safety.

Reported symptoms that may be related to the recalled products have included those linked to seizures, agitation, involuntary muscle contractions, loss of consciousness, confusion, sleepiness, nausea and vomiting, abnormal heart rates, and hyper/hypotension.

Oregon has one case. The individual has recovered from the illness. CDC reports there now are 58 cases across the country, with 30 hospitalizations. One death also is being investigated.

The FDA says Diamond Shruumz-brand products should no longer be available for sale. The products were previously available online and in person at a variety of retail locations nationwide, including smoke/vape shops. They also were available at retailers that sell hemp-derived products such as cannabidiol (CBD) or delta-8 tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-8 THC).

OHA and FDA are making the following recommendations:

  • Consumers should not eat, sell or serve any flavor of Diamond Shruumz-brand chocolate bars, cones or gummies.
  • Consumers should check their homes and discard these products, or return them to the company for a refund.
  • These products may appeal to children and teenagers. Parents and caregivers should consider discussing the information in this advisory with their children and take extra care to prevent children from eating them.
  • Retailers should not sell or distribute any flavor of Diamond Shruumz-brand chocolate bars, cones, or gummies, and should hold the product in a secure location and contact Diamond Shruumz to initiate the return and refund.
  • Those who become ill after consuming these products should contact their health care provider and/or call the Oregon Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222. Let Poison Center staff know you have recently consumed the Diamond Shruumz-brand chocolate bars, cones, and/or gummies.
  • Health care providers should report these illnesses to the Oregon Poison Center.

For more information:

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Learn more about Solid Waste Management and Sustainable Materials in and around Benton County (Photo)
Benton Co. Government - 07/09/24 2:35 PM
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Two related efforts regarding solid waste management and sustainable materials are underway in Benton County and the region. One is an expected Conditional Use Permit (CUP) application from Republic Services to expand Coffin Butte. Related to the anticipated request is general solid waste management at the Coffin Butte landfill. 

Benton County has developed a frequently asked questions document to address common questions about solid waste management in the region. Residents can learn more about solid waste management and the CUP process by visiting the following resources:

The second major initiative is Benton County’s broader effort to develop a regional Sustainable Materials Management Plan (SMMP). The aim of the SMMP is to identify opportunities and minimize negative impacts across the lifecycle of materials. The SMMP development process will involve problem identification, information gathering, solution making, and securing consensus from neighboring communities and the State. Benton County is collaborating with consultants and partners to create a regional, action-oriented plan that promotes long-term sustainability.

Visit our home page and sign up to stay informed with news updates from Benton County




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Oregon State Fire Marshal announces first deliveries of type 6 fire engines to Jefferson and Lebanon fire districts (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/09/24 2:14 PM
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SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon State Fire Marshal is thrilled to announce the delivery of the first type 6 fire engines to the Jefferson Fire District and Lebanon Fire District. These deliveries are a milestone in the OSFM Engine Program, enhancing firefighting capabilities across Oregon.

The OSFM Engine Program purchased 76 new apparatus, including 26 Type 3 engines, 20 Type 6 engines, and 30 water tenders. So far, eight Type 3 engines and eight water tenders have been delivered to local agencies throughout the state. Ongoing deliveries of these apparatus will continue as the agency receives them. 

"We are excited to see the first type 6 engines arrive at Jefferson and Lebanon fire districts,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “This program represents a significant investment in the safety of our communities and the effectiveness of our firefighting efforts.”

The OSFM Engine Program, funded through Senate Bill 762, signed into law in 2021, is modernizing the equipment available to Oregon's structural fire service. This program ensures that local fire agencies have the necessary tools to effectively combat wildfires and protect lives and property.

For more information about the OSFM Engine Program and the ongoing efforts to improve wildfire response, please visit the OSFM Engine Program webpage.




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Marine Board Meeting in Salem July 24
Oregon State Marine Board - 07/09/24 2:00 PM

The Oregon State Marine Board will convene its quarterly meeting in Salem on July 24, 2024. The meeting will be held at the Marine Board office, 435 Commercial St., NE. in Salem, beginning at 8:30 am. 

The Board agenda includes the following items:

  • Director’s Report
  • Public Outreach Discussion
  • Outfitter Guide Legislative Concept Discussion, for Board Approval
  • 2025-2027 Agency Budget, for Board Approval
  • Oregon’s Kitchen Table, Upper Rogue River Process Update

Public comments for this meeting will be accepted in writing or by attending the public comment portion at the beginning of the hybrid meeting. To provide written or oral testimony, register with Jennifer Cooper no later than 5 pm on July 21, 2024. Register to speak or send written comments to .cooper@boat.oregon.gov">jennifer.cooper@boat.oregon.gov or by U.S. Mail to Oregon State Marine Board, Attn: Jennifer Cooper, 435 Commercial St NE Ste 400 Salem, OR 97301. 

To view the agenda and board materials and for a link to the meeting live stream, visit the agency’s Public Meetings page. Meetings are conducted using Microsoft Teams and viewing may require the installation of a free Teams app for mobile devices.

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Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution hosting graudation for successful completion of Roots of Success program
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/09/24 1:59 PM
What:

Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution (EOCI) is hosting a graduation for successful completion of Roots of Success. A peer led program helping adults in custody make positive choices, on their path to rehabilitation. 

For information about the Roots of Success program visit Home - Roots of Success.

When:  

July 15, 2024

Check in at 12:00 PM

Event 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Where:

Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution

2500 Westgate 

Pendleton, OR 97801 

RSVP:

RSVP to Chris Scarr, via email no later than 3:00 PM on Thursday, July 11, 2024. A background check is required for access into the facility. A list of equipment, tripods, batteries, microphone, cameras, etc. will be required.

 

EOCI is a multi-custody prison located in Pendleton that houses over 1,550 adults in custody. The institution is known for its Oregon Corrections Enterprises industries, including a garment factory that produces Prison Blues©, whose products are sold in and outside the United States. Other industries are its embroidery and laundry facilities. EOCI provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, drug and alcohol treatment, mental health treatment, religious services, and work crews. The buildings that make up EOCI were constructed in 1912 and 1913 and were originally used as a state mental hospital. After two years of renovation, EOCI received its first occupants in June 1985.

The Oregon Department of Corrections is responsible for the care and custody of approximately 12,000 men and women who are incarcerated in 12 institutions across the state. 


Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/09/24 11:51 AM
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An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Corey Allen Sanders, died July 9, 2024. Sanders was incarcerated at Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) in Ontario and passed away at the institution. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the State Medical Examiner will determine cause of death.

Sanders entered DOC custody on September 19, 2022, from Yamhill County with an earliest release date of November 8, 2033. Sanders was 49 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of approximately 12,000 individuals who are incarcerated in 12 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 adults in custody. SRCI has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. SRCI specializes in incentive housing, specialized housing, individuals with mental health/medical vulnerabilities, education and trades programs, cognitive and parenting programs, and institution work programs. SRCI opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.

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Los hogares del condado de Deschutes que reciben SNAP y perdieron alimentos debido a los incendios forestales tienen hasta el 25 de julio para solicitar beneficios de reemplazo
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 07/09/24 10:59 AM

(Salem) – Las personas que viven en el condado de Deschutes y perdieron alimentos comprados con beneficios del Programa de Asistencia Nutricional Suplementaria (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, SNAP por sus siglas en inglés) debido a los recientes incendios forestales tienen hasta el jueves 25 de julio de 2024 para solicitar los beneficios de reemplazo al Departamento de Servicios humanos de Oregon (Oregon Department of Human Services, ODHS por sus siglas en español).

El ODHS recibió la aprobación federal para extender el plazo normal de 10 días para solicitar beneficios de reemplazo con el fin de apoyar a los hogares del condado de Deschutes afectados por los incendios actuales. Los hogares fuera del condado de Deschutes deben seguir el proceso habitual y solicitar los beneficios de reemplazo dentro de los 10 días siguientes a la pérdida.

Cualquier persona que haya desechado alimentos comprados con beneficios de SNAP que fueron destruidos debido a un desastre puede solicitar beneficios de reemplazo por el costo de los alimentos perdidos. La cantidad máxima del reemplazo es igual al beneficio mensual normal de SNAP del hogar.

Los solicitantes deben estar preparados para proporcionar una lista de los alimentos perdidos, el costo de reemplazarlos, y puede que tengan que proporcionar pruebas del evento que destruyó los alimentos.

Puede solicitar sus beneficios de reemplazo de SNAP de las siguientes formas:

Una vez que hayan sido aprobados, los beneficios de reemplazo se agregarán a la tarjeta Oregon Trail/de transferencia electrónica de beneficios (Electronic Benefits Transfer, EBT por sus siglas en inglés) existente del hogar.

Solicitudes de reemplazo para los beneficios de EBT de Verano 

Las familias que participan en el nuevo programa de EBT de Verano para niños en edad escolar también pueden solicitar beneficios de reemplazo. No hay fecha límite para solicitar beneficios de reemplazo para el EBT de verano. 

Para solicitar beneficios de reemplazo de EBT de Verano, llame al Centro de Llamadas de EBT de Verano al 1-833-673-7328. El centro de llamadas está abierto de lunes a viernes de 8:00 a.m. a 5:00 p.m., hora del Pacífico. Si su hogar recibe tanto beneficios de SNAP como beneficios de EBT de Verano, el centro de llamadas puede ayudarle a solicitar beneficios de reemplazo para ambos al mismo tiempo.

Recursos para ayudarle a satisfacer sus necesidades básicas

  • Encuentre una despensa de alimentos: Visite oregonfoodbank.org/es
  • Obtenga más información acerca de los programas del gobierno y los recursos de la comunidad para adultos mayores y personas con discapacidades: Llame al 1-855-673-2372 o visite adrcoforegon.org.
  • Encuentre más recursos cerca de usted: Marque 211, envíe un mensaje de texto con su código postal al 898-211, o visite 211info.org

Administrado por el ODHS, el SNAP es un programa federal que brinda asistencia de alimentos a aproximadamente 1 millón de familias y personas elegibles de bajos recursos en Oregon, incluyendo a muchos adultos mayores y personas con discapacidades. Cualquier persona de Oregon que lo necesite puede solicitar beneficios, incluyendo SNAP, cuidado de niños, asistencia en efectivo y Medicaid. Obtenga más información en beneficios.oregon.gov.

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Deschutes County households who receive SNAP and lost food due to wildfires have until July 25 to request replacement benefits
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 07/09/24 10:54 AM

(Salem) – People who live in Deschutes County and lost food purchased with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits due to recent wildfires have until Thursday, July 25, 2024 to request replacement benefits from the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS).

ODHS received federal approval to waive the usual 10-day replacement benefit request deadline to help support Deschutes County households impacted by ongoing fires. Households who live outside Deschutes County must follow the usual process and request replacement benefits within 10 days of the loss.

Anyone who disposed of food bought with SNAP benefits that was destroyed due to a disaster can request replacement benefits for the cost of the lost food. The maximum replacement amount is equal to the household's normal monthly SNAP benefit.

Requestors should be prepared to provide a list of the lost food, the cost to replace it, and may have to provide proof of the event that destroyed the food.

Replacement SNAP benefits may be requested by:

Once approved, replacement benefits are added to the households’ existing Oregon Trail / Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card.

Summer EBT replacement benefit requests 

Families participating in the new Summer EBT program for school-aged children can also request replacement benefits. There is no deadline for requesting replacement Summer EBT benefits. 

To request replacement Summer EBT benefits, call the Summer EBT Call Center at 1-833-673-7328. The Call Center is open weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Pacific Time. If your household receives both SNAP and Summer EBT food benefits, the Call Center can help you with replacement requests for both at the same time.

Resources to help meet basic needs

  • Find a food pantry: Visit oregonfoodbank.org
  • Learn about government programs and community resources for older adults and people with disabilities: Call 1-855-673-2372 or visit adrcoforegon.org.
  • Find more resources near you: Dial 211, text your zip code to 898-211, or visit 211info.org

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at benefits.oregon.gov.

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Oregon youth suicide data shows action needed to close equity gaps
Oregon Health Authority - 07/09/24 10:11 AM

July 9, 2024 

Media contact: Dean Carson, 503-348-9233, son2@oha.oregon.gov">dean.carson2@oha.oregon.gov 

Oregon youth suicide data shows action needed to close equity gaps 

Despite culturally responsive suicide prevention efforts, racial inequities remain 

Editor’s Note: If you or someone you know is struggling or in crisis, help is available 24/7. Call or text 988 or chat online at 988Lifeline.org. Specialized support is also available through the Veterans Crisis Line (press 1 or text 838255), in Spanish (press 2 or text “AYUDA” to 988) and for LGBTQIA2S+ youth and young adults (press 3 or text “PRIDE” to 988). 988 is also available for individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing through American Sign Language videophone services.  

Salem, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority’s (OHA) Youth Suicide Intervention and Prevention Plan (YSIPP) annual report, which contains new analysis of 2022 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) death by suicide data, shows the risk of youth suicide continues to be a concern in Oregon, particularly for youth of color. 

In 2022, the most recent year of finalized data from the CDC, 109 Oregon youth ages 24 and younger died by suicide, Oregon’s first year-to-year increase since 2018. Despite the 2022 increase (up from 95 deaths in 2021), there were 16% fewer youth deaths in 2022 compared with a peak of 129 deaths in 2018. Moreover, preliminary data, which will not be finalized until spring 2025, suggest that 2023 will not see a further year-to-year increase in youth suicide rates. 

The 2022 data show that Oregon had the 12th highest youth suicide rate in the U.S. Suicide remains the second-leading cause of death in Oregon among this age group.  

The YSIPP annual report also highlights Oregon’s investments in this area, including support for statewide programming in youth suicide prevention, intervention and postvention services. The report details important advances in youth suicide prevention in Oregon, such as the addition of 343 suicide prevention trainers in the state, including 67 who speak languages other than English.     

In a letter to Oregonians accompanying the report, OHA Behavioral Health Director Ebony Clarke notes, “We have made some progress to create a system of suicide prevention that is better connected and better resourced. Yet, the tragedy of youth suicide remains. We need to do more, particularly for young people of color.”  

Data highlighted in the report show that stark racial disparities remain, both in Oregon and nationwide. Oregon deaths by suicide for youth identified as white have decreased overall since the overall peak in 2018, but the number of suicides for youth of other races and ethnicities either remained similar to 2018 or have increased.  

OHA’s suicide prevention team, along with the hundreds of suicide prevention trainers, advocates, community members and champions around the state, including the Oregon Alliance to Prevent Suicide, are working to implement key initiatives for youth suicide prevention discussed in the YSIPP. This includes programming that supports young people to find hope, help and strength, training programs to teach youth-serving adults how to recognize warning signs of suicide, and advanced skills training for providers to be equipped to help clients heal from thoughts of suicide.   

OHA and its partners are also working hard to launch culturally specific initiatives to increase protective factors that support youth in Oregon. In 2023-24, these efforts have included: 

  • Tribal prevention programs amplifying “culture as prevention” and hosting train-the-trainers for OHA’s “Big River” youth suicide prevention programming, which is available across the state at low or no cost. 
  • Black, African and African American youth-serving adults creating and sustaining the Black Youth Suicide Prevention Coalition, which is helping to bring healing to Black communities and creating spaces for young people to gather and feel a sense of belonging. Oregon also was one of eight states invited to participate in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Black Youth Suicide Prevention Initiative Policy Academy, which was highlighted as a key “Health Equity in Suicide Prevention” strategy in the federal government’s recently released 10-year 2024 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention
  • OHA infused an additional $500,000 of funding to increase the availability of suicide prevention training and trainers who are Latino/a/x, Spanish-speaking or both. 
  • Oregon’s suicide prevention leaders are also working with Joyce Chu and Chris Weaver of the Culture & Suicide Prevention Institute, to infuse their cultural theory and model for suicide prevention into existing trainings, policies and programming. This work, which will increase attention to culturally specific risk and protective factors in Oregon’s suicide prevention efforts, is also an equity initiative highlighted in the 2024 National Strategy. 

Alfonso Ramirez, interim director of OHA’s Equity & Inclusion Division, reflected on the power of suicide prevention that centers connections to culture and belonging. Ramirez said, “Thanks to our community partners and leaders, we’ve recognized how important it is to also focus on the cultural strengths and wisdom that have been passed on for generations across communities. As we do work in this way, we experience a bit of healing ourselves.”  

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Grants awarded to historic property and archaeology projects across the state
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/09/24 7:25 AM

Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, awarded 18 grants totaling $299,999 for historic properties and archaeology projects. Six of the grants were awarded in the Diamonds in the Rough category. This grant funds façade enhancements that restore the historic character of the property. The other 12 grants were in the Preserving Oregon category for properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places and for archaeology projects.

Funded projects:

  • Façade restoration grants in Baker City, Independence, Lebanon, The Dalles, Union, and Malheur County.
  • One archaeology project:
    • Southern Oregon University Lab for study of the Maxville site in Wallowa County. 
  • Preservation of 11 historic properties:
    • Elks Lodge building, Medford
    • Butler Perozzi Fountain, Ashland
    • Giesy Store, Aurora
    • Masonic Lodge building, Baker City
    • Antelope School building, Antelope
    • Eltrym Theater, baker City
    • Santiam Pass Ski Lodge, Linn County
    • Gordon House, Silverton
    • Rock Creek Cemetery, Clackamas County
    • Hanley Farm, Jackson County
    • Old Post Office building, Weston

These grants are approved by the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation, a nine-member group that reviews nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. The members are professionally recognized in the fields of history, architecture, archaeology and other related disciplines.

For more information about the grant program, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.gill@oprd.oregon.gov">Kuri.gill@oprd.oregon.gov or 503-986-0685. 




Attached Media Files: 2024 Preserving Oregon Grant award list , 2024 Diamonds in the Rough award list

Mon. 07/08/24
Darlene Way Fire
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office - 07/08/24 5:00 PM

Released by: Lieutenant Jayson Janes

Date: June 25, 2024

Location: Darlene Way and Finley Butte, La Pine

Update July 8, 2024 5:00 PM

After consultation with fire managers, the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office is lifting all evacuation notices around the Darlene 3 Fire effective today.

Updated maps and information can be found at www.deschutes.org/emergency.

Numerous road closures remain in effect around the fire. The public is asked to respect these road closures as well as closures put in place by the Deschutes National Forest and Prineville District of the Bureau of Land Management. These closures are in place to protect the public and firefighters working in the area.

UPDATE July 1, 2024 5:00 PM

After consultation with fire managers, the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office is lowering some evacuation levels effective 6 PM on July 1, 2024. These levels may change again as conditions change.  Residents should remain vigilant and stay informed about changing conditions.

Current evacuation notices:

Level 2: Be Set - All areas immediately surrounding the Darlene 3 Fire including areas east of the BNSF railroad tracks, north of the Deschutes/Klamath County line, and public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management and United States Forest Service.

Level 1: Be Ready - Newberry Estates subdivision off of Rosland Road and the commercial areas east of Hwy 97 near Wickiup Junction including areas off of Drafter Rd and Rosland Rd. Additionally all areas bound east of Hwy 97, north of Hwy 31 and west of the BNSF rail road tracks.

All other areas under various evacuation notices have remained unchanged.

Updated maps and information can be found at www.deschutes.org/emergency.

Numerous road closures remain in effect around the fire. The public is asked to respect these road closures as well as closures put in place by the Deschutes National Forest and Prineville District of the Bureau of Land Management. These closures are in place to protect the public and firefighters working in the area.

UPDATE June 28, 2024 12:00 PM

After consultation with fire managers, the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office is lowering some evacuation levels. These levels may change again as conditions change.  Residents should remain vigilant and stay informed about changing conditions.

The Newberry Estates subdivision has been reduced from Level 3: Go Now to Level 2: Be Set.  Residents should understand there is still risk and they should be prepared to evacuate at a moment's notice.

The residential area immediately north of Burgess Rd and east of the Little Deschutes River has been reduced from Level 1: Be Ready to no evacuation notice.

All other areas under various evacuation notices have remained unchanged.

Updated maps and information can be found at www.deschutes.org/emergency.

Numerous road closures remain in effect around the fire. The public is asked to respect these road closures as well as closures put in place by the Deschutes National Forest and Prineville District of the Bureau of Land Management. These closures are in place to protect the public and firefighters working in the area.

UPDATE June 27, 2024 11:30 AM

After consultation with fire managers, the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office is adjusting evacuation levels. These levels may change again as conditions change.  

Level 3: Go Now evacuation levels include:

All areas east of the the BNSF railroad tracks to FS Road 9736 and FS 22 (Finley Butte Rd) and north of the Deschutes/Klamath Line north to just north of Newberry Estates subdivision.

Level 2: Be Set evacuation levels include:

Areas immediately east of Hwy 97 north of the line even with the Hwy 97/Burgess Rd north to include Drafter Rd area. (reduced from Level 3)

Industrial area on Russel Rd from Reed Rd south to the end of Russel Rd (reduced from level 3).

Areas north of Hwy 31 between Hwy 97 east to the BNSF Railroad tracks.

Areas north of FS Rd 21 (Paulina-East Lake Rd) to Paulina Creek west of FS 9736.

Level 1: Be Ready evacuation levels include:

Residential area immediately west of Hwy 97, north of Burgess Rd and east of the Little Deschutes River.

Updated maps and information can be found at www.deschutes.org/emergency.

UPDATE June 26, 2024 11:33 AM

Level 1 BE READY evacuation level has been issued for the area west of Hwy 97 north of Burgess Rd. east of the Little Deschutes River and south of Riverview Dr. 

 

UPDATE 6:57 PM

Evacuation level reduced to Level 2 BE SET. The area east of Hwy 97 south of Bassett Dr between the train tracks has been reduced from Level 3 to Level 2. 

UPDATE 6:09 PM

Level 3 GO NOW Evacuations for the areas east of Hwy 97 south of Drafter Rd. South of Bassett Dr. to Hwy 31.

Level 2 BE SET Evacuations for the area east of Hwy 97 to the train tracks from Reed Rd. south to Bassett Dr. 

Please continue to deschutes.org/emergency for the most up to date evacuation levels

UPDATE 5:38 PM

A livestock and small animal shelter has been established at the La Pine Rodeo Grounds with support from the Pet Evacuation Team. 

 

UPDATE 3:48 PM

Level 3 GO NOW Evacuations have been issued for the area east of Hwy 97 north of Reed Rd including areas off Rosland Rd. and Newberry Estates. 

 

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office is assisting with a fire in the area of Darlene Way and Finley Butte Rd. in La Pine. 

Level 3 GO NOW Evacuations have been issued for the area east of the railroad tracks near Darlene Way and Ice Cave Rd.

Level 2 BE SET Evacuations have been issued for the areas east of Hwy 97 and south of Rosland Pit.

Level 1 BE READY Evacuations have been issued for the area east of Hwy 97 along Rosland Rd including Newberry Estates. 

A temporary evacuation point has been established at La Pine High School for evacuees needing support. 

Please avoid the area as there is a large amount of fire equipment working on this fire. 

For the most updated information please go to deschutes.org/emergency 

 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full-service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with five K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 259 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 193 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.


Universal Health Plan Governance Board announces public committee volunteer opportunities (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 07/08/24 11:34 AM
Universal Health Plan Governance Board logo
Universal Health Plan Governance Board logo
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July 8, 2024

Salem – The Universal Health Plan Governance Board (UHPGB) is recruiting members of the public to volunteer to join its work.

The Oregon Legislature created the Universal Health Plan Governance Board with Senate Bill 1089 in 2023. The board is charged with developing a comprehensive plan to finance and administer a universal health plan for all Oregon residents. The board is seeking committee members to help create the plan, which is due to be presented to Gov. Tina Kotek and the Legislature by September 2026.

The board will select members of the public to serve on four committees:

  • Community Engagement and Communications
  • Finance and Revenue
  • Plan Design and Expenditures
  • Operations and Transition

“The work of these committees will be the basis of our recommendations for a new universal, simplified, high-quality health care system in Oregon,” said Dr. Helen Bellanca, UHPGB chairperson. “It is both challenging and exciting. We need to tap into the broad knowledge, expertise, and lived experiences of people from all around our state to be successful.”

Each committee will have board members serve as a chairperson and a board liaison; the committees will also have additional community members, experts, or interested parties. The board is recruiting people with expertise, as well as those with lived experience to serve on one of the four committees. The following is a summary of the deliverables for each committee and some of the skills and perspectives needed.

Committees:

Community Engagement and Communications – Develop recommendations on community engagement and communications materials that will reach businesses, health care providers, and the public. This includes focused engagement with interested parties as called out in the legislation that created the board. Committee members may have lived experience or knowledge of specific industries and communities affected by a universal health plan.

Finance and Revenue – Develop recommendations to the board on a unified financing strategy for the universal health plan. Committee members may have knowledge of finance and revenue, business administration of health care benefits, and Oregon’s taxation system.

Plan Design and Expenditures – Make recommendations to the board on the elements of the universal health plan, including eligibility, benefit design, quality improvement, provider reimbursements, cost containment strategies, and workforce needs. Committee members will need to have experience and knowledge of the health care industry as a consumer, provider, or academic.

Operations – Make recommendations to the board on the future operations of a new public corporation dedicated to providing health care for all people who live in Oregon. This committee also will be responsible for a transition plan from the status quo to a universal health plan. Committee members will need to be interested in, and have knowledge of, health plan operations.

To ensure equitable representation, the board is seeking diverse representatives from all identities and areas of the state.

To apply, complete the UHPGB committee application online at oregon.gov/uhpgb. Applications are due by 11:59 p.m. Sunday, July 28. For questions or help, contact the Universal Health Plan Governance Board at .info@dcbs.oregon.gov">uhpgb.info@dcbs.oregon.gov.

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About UHPGB: The Oregon Legislature created the Universal Health Plan Governance Board with Senate Bill 1089 in 2023. The board is charged with developing a comprehensive plan to finance and administer a universal health plan, which is due to the Legislature no later than Sept. 15, 2026. For more information, visit oregon.gov/uhpgb.




Attached Media Files: Universal Health Plan Governance Board logo

[Redmond Address Correction] Shepherd's House Ministries: Urgent Appeal for Water Donations (Photo)
Shepherd's House Ministries - 07/08/24 11:10 AM
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

July 8, 2024

With temperatures soaring above 100 degrees in the coming days and expected to stay in the mid-90s through the weekend in Central Oregon, many men, women, and children living on the streets face severe dehydration and other dangerous health risks. To address this critical need, Shepherd’s House Ministries urgently requests donations of bottled water (cases or pallets of individual-sized bottles) to alleviate the current shortage. Monetary contributions are also greatly appreciated.

How to Donate:
Drop off water donations at our Division Street location:
- Hours: Monday - Saturday, 8 am to 4 pm
- Address: 1854 NE Division Street, Bend

Additionally, donations can be delivered to:
- Address: 1350 S Hwy 97, Redmond

The community's generosity can make a significant difference in the lives of those in need during this challenging time. 

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Attached Media Files: 2024-07/3949/173579/SHM_Logo_Primary_Color_copy.png

Fatal Crash - HWY 130 - Tillamook County
Oregon State Police - 07/08/24 10:16 AM

Tillamook County, Ore. 7 July 24- On Sunday, July 7, 2024, at 2:00 p.m., Oregon State Police responded to a single-vehicle crash on Hwy-130, near milepost 3, in Tillamook County.

The preliminary investigation indicated westbound GMC Sierra, operated by Tyler Jacob Bell (32) of Dallas, left the roadway, rolled down an embankment, and came to rest on the driver's side of the vehicle in the river below.

The operator of the GMC (Bell), who is not believed to have been wearing a seatbelt, was declared deceased at the scene.

The highway was impacted for approximately 4.5 hours during the on-scene investigation. Speed is considered the primary cause of the crash.

OSP was assisted by Nestucca Rural Fire, Tillamook County Sheriffs' Office, and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Fatal Crash - HWY 211 - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 07/08/24 9:59 AM

Clackamas County, Ore. 6 July 24- On Saturday, July 6, 2024, at 11:30 a.m., Oregon State Police responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy-211, near milepost 18, in Clackamas County.

The preliminary investigation indicated a southbound Nissan Pathfinder, operated by William Ballew (46) of McMinnville, left it's lane of travel for unknown reasons and struck a northbound Ford F350, operated by Tony Luttrell (40) of Molalla, head-on.

The operator of the Nissan (Ballew) was transported by life-flight to an area hospital where they were declared deceased.

The operator of the Ford (T. Luttrell) was transported by life-flight to an area hospital in critical condition. Two passengers in the Ford, Sabrina Luttrell (48) and a female juvenile (13), were transported to an area hospital with minor injuries. A third passenger in the Ford, Laura Hein (27), was reportedly uninjured.

The highway was impacted for approximately 5 hours during the on-scene investigation. 

OSP was assisted by Molalla Fire, Colton Fire, Molalla Police Department, and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


The Writing Ranch and High Desert Museum Host Unique Nature Writing Intensive at Oregon's Summer Lake Lodge - Nurture your creative side at the 4th annual Lost in Place Nature Writing Intensive (Photo)
High Desert Museum - 07/08/24 9:55 AM
Dennis Jenkins
Dennis Jenkins
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Monday, July 8, 2024

BEND, OR — Calling all writers and nature enthusiasts! The Writing Ranch in collaboration with the High Desert Museum is again hosting the Lost in Place Nature Writing Intensive at the scenic Summer Lake Lodge in Summer Lake, Oregon. Scheduled from August 8 to 11, this will be a weekend of exploration and creativity inspired by the breathtaking landscapes of the High Desert.

Participants will gain a deeper understanding of High Desert flora and fauna as well as the region's rich archaeological heritage thanks to morning field trips led by Jon Nelson, naturalist and Curator of Wildlife at the High Desert Museum, and Dennis Jenkins, noted archaeologist field school director for the Museum of Natural and Cultural History at the University of Oregon. 

Daily generative writing workshops will be led by High Desert author and poet, Ellen Waterston. Waterston serves on the faculty of OSU-Cascades MFA, is the founder of the Writing Ranch, and in 2024 was recognized with Soapstone’s Bread and Roses and Literary Arts’ Stuart H. Holbrook literary awards. 

"The Lost in Place Nature Writing Intensive is an opportunity for writers to explore the role of nature in their poetry and prose,” says Waterston. “You’d be hard pressed to find a more beautiful location for this exploration to take place.”

Space for the Lost in Place Nature Writing Intensive is limited. Interested participants are encouraged to RSVP early to secure their spots. To register or learn more about this enriching experience, visit highdesertmuseum.org/lost-in-place or email info@writingranch.com with questions.

ABOUT THE WRITING RANCH: 

Ellen Waterston is the founder and president of the Writing Ranch which, since 2000, has been dedicated to supporting the craft and careers of established and emerging writers through multi-day generative workshops and retreats. Guest faculty’s expertise heightens participants’ experience of the unique landscapes and cultures where Writing Ranch workshops are held. www.writingranch.com 

 

ABOUT THE MUSEUM:

The HIGH DESERT MUSEUM opened in Bend, Oregon in 1982. It brings together wildlife, cultures, art, history and the natural world to convey the wonder of North America’s High Desert. The Museum is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, is a Smithsonian Affiliate, was the 2019 recipient of the Western Museums Association’s Charles Redd Award for Exhibition Excellence and was a 2021 recipient of the National Medal for Museum and Library Service. To learn more, visit highdesertmuseum.org and follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

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Attached Media Files: Dennis Jenkins , Jon Nelson , The Lodge at Summer Lake , Ellen Waterston

Fatal Crash - HWY 101 - Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 07/08/24 9:48 AM

Douglas County, Ore. 6 July 24- On Saturday, July 6, 2024, at 1:32 p.m., Oregon State Police responded to a motorcycle crash on Hwy-101, near milepost 207, in Douglas County.

The preliminary investigation indicated a northbound Harley Davidson motorcycle, operated by Johnny Ray Boles (43) of Notus (ID), attempted to pass in between two northbound vehicles that were occupying both the A and B lanes of travel. The Harley Davidson lost control, left the roadway, and ejected the operator into a guardrail.

The operator of the Harley Davidson (Boles) was declared deceased at the scene.

The highway was not impacted during the on-scene investigation. The cause of the crash is believed to be unsafe passing.

OSP was assisted by Gardner Fire, Douglas County Sheriffs' Office, and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Fatal Crash - HWY 26 - Jefferson County
Oregon State Police - 07/08/24 9:39 AM

Jefferson County, Ore. 6 July 24- On Saturday, July 6, 2024, at 9:11 a.m., Oregon State Police responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy-26, at the intersection with Northwest Columbia Dr., in Jefferson County.

The preliminary investigation indicated a Ford Escape, operated by Robert Carroll Towler (88) of Madras, was facing south on Northwest Columbia Dr at the stop sign. The Ford made a right hand turn onto westbound Hwy-26 and entered the path of a westbound GMC Sierra, operated by Donald Michael Stucky (59) of West Linn. The GMC struck the drivers side door of the Ford as it entered the lane of travel.

The operator of the Ford (Towler) was declared deceased at the scene.

The operator of the GMC (D. Stucky) was not injured during the collision. Two Passengers in the GMC, Nesja Geneva Stucky (57) and Maia Cathlyne Stucky (22), were transported for reportedly minor injuries. A third passenger in the GMC, Gavin Lee Pilant (21) of Beaverton, was not injured.

The highway was impacted for approximately 3.5 hours during the on-scene investigation. The cause of the crash is believed to be failing to yield the right of way when entering the highway.

OSP was assisted by the Jefferson County Sheriffs' Office, Madras Fire, and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Western Oregon University hosts regional gaming competition (Photo)
Western Oregon University - 07/08/24 8:15 AM
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 MONMOUTH, Ore. – Western Oregon University hosted the 17th season of the Oregon Game Project Challenge, a video game development competition for middle and high school students. 

Each fall, OGPC announces a theme for the year’s competition, which is typically held in May. Teams then work together to design a video game based on that theme to present at the main event. Students interact with judges, event attendees, and tech industry professionals during the competition.

This past May, 60 teams (285 students) participated, representing over 30 schools from Oregon and southern Washington. Each team has between 2-7 members and an adult coach. See this year’s winners.

Western has hosted the competition since 2017 and will host it again next year. The date for next year’s event will be announced this fall. “OGPC seeks to inspire students to develop various skills based on their passion for making video games,” shares Andrew Scholer, director of OGPC. “Students write code, create art and music, craft a story, and design gameplay. They learn project management and teamwork as they collaborate over multiple months to deliver a project. And they practice their soft skills as they present their project to judges and other students.”

OGPC was started by a non-profit arm of the Software Association of Oregon (now the Technology Association of Oregon). In 2015 it was spun off as an independent 501(c)(3) non-profit also called Oregon Game Project Challenge. Learn more.

 

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About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, established in Monmouth in 1856, proudly stands as Oregon’s oldest public university. Hosting around 4,000 students, Western embodies a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution, with approximately 80% of its students hailing from within the state. Notably, its diverse student body comprises individuals from underrepresented backgrounds, veterans, and non-traditional learners. Western stands as the preferred campus in Oregon for those pursuing an enriching education within a nurturing, student-focused environment, characterized by faculty-led instruction. Where YOU belong.


 




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/1107/173570/Gaming_PR_Photo.jpg

Sun. 07/07/24
La Pine Male arrested on Weapon's Offense
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office - 07/07/24 5:03 AM

Release by:  Sergeant Kyle Kalmbach

Release Date: 07/07/2024

Location:  15000 Block of Old Mill Road, La Pine

Arrested:  Bounds, Richard Allen, 33 year-old male, La Pine, OR

Charges:

1 Count of Unlawful Use of a Weapon

1 Count of Felon in Possession of a Firearm

1 Count of Reckless Endangering another Person

1 Count – In-State Warrant

 

On July 06, 2024 at approximately 11:00 PM, deputies were dispatched to a dispute at the 15000 block of Old Mill Road in La Pine, OR.  Initial reports included a dispute involving gunfire.  Deputies responded to the scene and heard additional gunshots. At that point, due to the nature of the call, the Deschutes County SWAT Team was activated.  After a period of time, a Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office K-9 was deployed to prevent the subject from obtaining additional weapons.  At approximately 11:58 PM Richard Bounds was taken into custody in the front yard of the residence after being identified as the subject firing the weapon.  Bounds was later transported to St. Charles Hospital for the ingestion of a harmful substance and minor injuries from a K9 bite. At this time, Bounds is currently being treated at St. Charles Hospital and will later be lodge into the Deschutes County Adult Jail when medically released.  No other people on scene were injured.  The firearm used in the commission of the crime was determined to be a shotgun which was later recovered.  The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the Bend Police Department, Oregon State Police, Sunriver Police Department, and the La Pine Fire Department for their assistance.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with five K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 259 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 193 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

 

## End of Release ##


Sat. 07/06/24
Apparent strong gust of wind pushes small plane onto its nose while landing at Sunriver Airport; no injuries. (Photo)
Sunriver Police Dept. - 07/06/24 5:37 PM
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On July 6th, at approximately 1:36 pm, the Sunriver Police Department responded to a reported airplane crash at the Sunriver Airport. A 1957 Piper PA-22-150 single engine aircraft crashed as it was landing on the #18 runway at the airport. The aircraft had landed on the runway and was traveling with all three wheels on the ground, when an apparent strong gust of wind pushed the aircraft’s left wing at an angle which caused it to make contact with the runway. The plane’s nose and propeller then also made contact with the runway. The sole occupant, the pilot, was able to exit the aircraft and is reportedly uninjured.   

Sunriver Police notified the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The plane was removed from the runway at 2:30 pm and the runway was re-opened to air traffic. 

The Sunriver Police Department would like to thank the Sunriver Airport and its employees for their assistance. 




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